embouchure vs mouthpiece what difference

what is difference between embouchure and mouthpiece

English

Etymology

From French embouchure, from emboucher (to put in one’s mouth), from en- (in) + bouche (mouth), from Latin bucca (cheek).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌɒm.bʊˈʃʊə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɑm.bə.ʃɚ/, /ˌɑm.bəˈʃʊɹ/

Noun

embouchure (countable and uncountable, plural embouchures)

  1. (music) The use of the lips, facial muscles, tongue, and teeth when playing a wind instrument.
    • 1963, Thomas Pynchon, V.:
      you could see the twin lines running down from either side of his lower lip, etched in by the force of his embouchure, looking like extensions of his mustache.
  2. (archaic) The mouth of a river or valley.

Translations


French

Etymology

From emboucher +‎ -ure

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.bu.ʃyʁ/

Noun

embouchure f (plural embouchures)

  1. mouthpiece (of a musical instrument)
  2. embouchure (of a wind instrument player)
  3. mouth (of a river)
    Antonym: source
    Hyponyms: delta, estuaire
  4. bit (horse controlling mechanism)

Further reading

  • “embouchure” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

mouth +‎ piece

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaʊθˌpiːs/

Noun

mouthpiece (plural mouthpieces)

  1. A part of any device that functions in or near the mouth, especially:
    1. The part of a telephone that is held close to the mouth.
    2. The part of a wind instrument that is held in or against the mouth.
  2. A spokesman; one who speaks on behalf of someone else.
    The novel’s protagonist serves as a mouthpiece for the author’s political views.
  3. (slang) A lawyer for the defense.

Translations


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