embrace vs hug what difference

what is difference between embrace and hug

English

Etymology

The verb is derived from Middle English embracen (to clasp in one’s arms, embrace; to reach out eagerly for, welcome; to enfold, entwine; to ensnare, entangle; to twist, wrap around; to gird, put on; to lace; to be in or put into bonds; to put a shield on the arm; to grasp (a shield or spear); to acquire, take hold of; to receive; to undertake; to affect, influence; to incite; to unlawfully influence a jury; to surround; to conceal, cover; to shelter; to protect; to comfort; to comprehend, understand) [and other forms], from Old French embracer, embracier (to kiss) (modern French embrasser (to kiss; (dated) to embrace, hug)), from Late Latin *imbracchiāre, from in- (prefix meaning ‘in, inside, within’)) + bracchium (arm). The English word is analysable as em- +‎ brace.

The noun is derived from the verb.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛmˈbɹeɪs/, /ɪmˈbɹeɪs/
  • Rhymes: -eɪs
  • Hyphenation: em‧brace

Verb

embrace (third-person singular simple present embraces, present participle embracing, simple past and past participle embraced)

  1. (transitive) To clasp (someone or each other) in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug.
    Synonyms: fall on someone’s neck; see also Thesaurus:embrace
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To seize (something) eagerly or with alacrity; to accept or take up with cordiality; to welcome.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To submit to; to undergo.
    Synonym: accept
  4. (transitive, also figuratively) To encircle; to enclose, to encompass.
    Synonyms: entwine, surround
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To enfold, to include (ideas, principles, etc.); to encompass.
  6. (transitive, obsolete, rare) To fasten on, as armour.
  7. (transitive, figuratively, obsolete) To accept (someone) as a friend; to accept (someone’s) help gladly.
  8. (transitive, law, figuratively, obsolete) To attempt to influence (a court, jury, etc.) corruptly; to practise embracery.

Conjugation

Alternative forms

  • imbrace (obsolete)

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

embrace (plural embraces)

  1. An act of putting arms around someone and bringing the person close to the chest; a hug.
  2. (figuratively) An enclosure partially or fully surrounding someone or something.
  3. (figuratively) Full acceptance (of something).
  4. (figuratively) An act of enfolding or including.

Derived terms

  • deadly embrace
  • half-embrace
  • marital embrace

Translations

Notes

References

Further reading

  • embrace (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Spanish

Verb

embrace

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of embrazar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of embrazar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of embrazar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of embrazar.


English

Etymology

From earlier hugge (to embrace, clasp with the arms) (1560), probably representing a conflation of huck (to crouch, huddle down) and Old Norse hugga (to comfort, console), from hugr (mind, heart, thought), from Proto-Germanic *hugiz (mind, thought, sense), cognate with Icelandic hugga (to comfort), Old English hyġe (thought, mind, heart, disposition, intention, courage, pride) (whence high (Etymology 2)).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: hŭg, IPA(key): /hʌɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡ

Noun

hug (plural hugs)

  1. A close embrace, especially when charged with such an emotion as represented by: affection, joy, relief, lust, anger, aggression, compassion, and the like, as opposed to being characterized by formality, equivocation or ambivalence (a half-embrace or “little hug”).
  2. A particular grip in wrestling.

Translations

Verb

hug (third-person singular simple present hugs, present participle hugging, simple past and past participle hugged)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To crouch; huddle as with cold.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Palsgrave to this entry?)
  2. (intransitive) To cling closely together.
  3. (transitive) To embrace by holding closely, especially in the arms.
  4. (transitive) To stay close to (the shore etc.)
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To hold fast; to cling to; to cherish.
    • 1665, Joseph Glanvill, Scepsis Scientifica
      We hug intellectual deformities, if they bear our names

Synonyms

  • (crouch): hunker, squat, stoop
  • (cling closely): cleave, stick; see also Thesaurus:adhere
  • (embrace): accoll (obsolete), coll, embrace; see also Thesaurus:embrace
  • (stay close to):
  • (hold fast): treasure

Translations

Derived terms

  • body-hugging
  • figure-hugging
  • hug oneself
  • huggable
  • huggle
  • huggy

See also

  • cuddle
  • huggle
  • kiss
  • snuggle
  • squeeze

Anagrams

  • Ghu, ghu, ugh

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoɡ/, [ˈhɔɡ̊]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hǫgg, verbal noun to hǫggva (to hew) (Danish hugge).

Noun

hug n (singular definite hugget, plural indefinite hug)

  1. stroke
  2. slash
  3. cut
Inflection

References

  • “hug,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /huɡ/, [ˈhuɡ̊]

Noun

hug (uninflected)

  1. squat

References

  • “hug,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hoɡ/, [ˈhɔɡ̊]

Verb

hug

  1. imperative of hugge

Faroese

Noun

hug m

  1. indefinite accusative singular of hugur

Manx

Preposition

hug

  1. to

Inflection

Verb

hug

  1. past tense of toyr

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • hau

Etymology

From Old Norse hugr (thought), from Proto-Germanic *hugiz. Cognates include Norwegian Bokmål hu.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /hʉːɡ/, /hʉː/ (examples of pronunciation)

Noun

hug m (definite singular hugen, indefinite plural hugar, definite plural hugane)

  1. (chiefly uncountable) mind
  2. (chiefly uncountable, collective) one’s thoughts
  3. (chiefly uncountable) wish, desire
    • 1971, Olav H. Hauge, “T’ao Ch’ien”:
      Meir enn fyrr har han hug å draga seg attende til ein slik hageflekk.

      More than before, he has a desire to retreat to such a small garden.
  4. (uncountable, folklore) an itch in the nose which comes when someone is thinking of one, or as a warning that someone is about to arrive

Derived terms

Related terms

Adjective

hug

  1. (predicative) keen, eager

References

  • “hug” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

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