embrangle vs snarl what difference

what is difference between embrangle and snarl

English

Etymology

em- +‎ brangle

Verb

embrangle (third-person singular simple present embrangles, present participle embrangling, simple past and past participle embrangled)

  1. (transitive) To embroil.
    • 2003, Robert S. Leiken, Why Nicaragua Vanished: A Story of Reporters and Revolutionaries
      When it came to governments as hostile to Washington as the Sandinista, such an observation embrangles Sigal’s larger claim about “official dominance of national and foreign news.”
    • 1857, Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown’s School Days
      Then there was poor Jacob Dodson, the half-witted boy, who ambled about cheerfully, undertaking messages and little helpful odds and ends for every one, which, however, poor Jacob managed always hopelessly to embrangle.

Derived terms

  • embranglement


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsnɑː(ɹ)l/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(r)l

Etymology 1

From Middle English snarlen, frequentative of snaren (to trap, tangle). Equivalent to snare +‎ -le.

Verb

snarl (third-person singular simple present snarls, present participle snarling, simple past and past participle snarled)

  1. (transitive) To entangle; to complicate; to involve in knots.
    to snarl a skein of thread
  2. (intransitive) To become entangled.
  3. (transitive) To place in an embarrassing situation; to ensnare; to make overly complicated.
    • November 9, 1550, Hugh Latimer, Sermon Preached at Stanford
      [the] question that they would have snarled him with
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To be congested in traffic, or to make traffic congested.
  5. To form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface.

Derived terms

  • ensnarl
  • unsnarl

Translations

Noun

snarl (plural snarls)

  1. A knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle.
    Synonym: entanglement
  2. An intricate complication; a problematic difficulty; a knotty or tangled situation.
  3. A slow-moving traffic jam.

Synonyms

  • (entangled situation): imbroglio

Translations

Etymology 2

Frequentative of earlier snar (to growl), perhaps from Middle Low German snorren (to drone), of probably imitative origin. Equivalent to snar +‎ -le. Related to German schnarren (to rattle) and schnurren (to hum, buzz).

Verb

snarl (third-person singular simple present snarls, present participle snarling, simple past and past participle snarled)

  1. (intransitive) To growl angrily by gnashing or baring the teeth; to gnarl; to utter grumbling sounds.
  2. (transitive) To complain angrily; to utter growlingly.
  3. (intransitive) To speak crossly; to talk in rude, surly terms.
    • It is malicious and unmanly to snarl at the little lapses of a pen, from which Virgil himself stands not exempted.

Derived terms

  • snarling
  • snarlingly

Translations

Noun

snarl (plural snarls)

  1. The act of snarling; a growl; a surly or peevish expression; an angry contention.
  2. A growl, for example that of an angry or surly dog, or similar; grumbling sounds.
  3. A squabble.

Derived terms

  • snarl word

Translations

Further reading

  • snarl in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • snarl in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • snarl at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “snarl”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • “snarl”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • larns

Icelandic

Etymology

Back-formation from snarla.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /s(t)nartl/
  • Rhymes: -artl

Noun

snarl n (genitive singular snarls, no plural)

  1. snack (light meal)

Declension

See also

  • snakk

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • snarle

Etymology

Either from snare +‎ -el or a back-formation from snarlen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /snarl/

Noun

snarl (plural snarles) (rare)

  1. A trap for catching animals.
  2. A noose or snare (rope loop)
  3. (figuratively) A temptation or peril.

Descendants

  • English: snarl
  • Scots: snarl

References

  • “snarl(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

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