emetic vs vomit what difference

what is difference between emetic and vomit

English

Alternative forms

  • emetick (obsolete)

Etymology

From French émétique, from Vulgar Latin *emeticus, from Ancient Greek ἐμετικός (emetikós), from ἔμετος (émetos, vomit)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /əˈmɛt.ɪk/
    Rhymes: -ɛtɪk

Adjective

emetic (comparative more emetic, superlative most emetic)

  1. (pharmacology) causing nausea and vomiting
Translations

Noun

emetic (plural emetics)

  1. (pharmacology) an agent that induces vomiting
    Synonyms: vomitive, vomitory

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • emetic on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Romanian

Etymology

From French émétique, from Latin emeticus.

Noun

emetic n (uncountable)

  1. emetic

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English vomiten, from Latin vomitāre, present active infinitive of vomitō (vomit repeatedly), frequentative form of vomō (be sick, vomit), from Proto-Indo-European *wemh₁- (to spew, vomit). Cognate with Old Norse váma (nausea, malaise), Old English wemman (to defile). More at wem.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: vŏm’it, IPA(key): /ˈvɒmɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒmɪt
  • (US) enPR: vŏm’it, IPA(key): /ˈvɑmɪt/

Verb

vomit (third-person singular simple present vomits, present participle vomiting, simple past and past participle vomited)

  1. (intransitive) To regurgitate or eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth; puke.
    • The fish [] vomited out Jonah upon the dry land.
  2. (transitive) To regurgitate and discharge (something swallowed); to spew.
    • 1988, Angela Carter, ‘Peter Carey: Oscar and Lucinda’, in Shaking a Leg, Vintage 2013, p. 713:
      It is the illicit Christmas pudding an incorrigible servant cooks for the little boy one Christmas Day that sparks Oscar’s first crisis of belief, for his father, opposed to Christmas pudding on theological grounds, makes the child vomit his helping.
  3. To eject from any hollow place; to belch forth; to emit.
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, III [Uniform ed., p. 45-46]:
      “Hullo!” said the athlete, and vomited with this greeting a cloud of tobacco-smoke. It must have been imprisoned in his mouth some time, for no pipe was visible.
    • After about a minute, the creek bed vomited the debris into a gently sloped meadow. Saugstad felt the snow slow and tried to keep her hands in front of her.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:regurgitate
  • Derived terms

    • vomitable

    Translations

    Noun

    vomit (usually uncountable, plural vomits)

    1. The regurgitated former contents of a stomach; vomitus.
    2. The act of regurgitating.
      • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
        He removes his hat without misgiving, he unbuttons his coat and sits down, proffered all pure and open to the long joys of being himself, like a basin to a vomit.
    3. (obsolete) That which causes vomiting; an emetic.

    Synonyms

    • See also Thesaurus:vomit.

    Translations

    Derived terms

    • vomit comet

    See also

    • emetic

    French

    Verb

    vomit

    1. third-person singular present indicative of vomir
    2. third-person singular past historic of vomir

    Latin

    Verb

    vomit

    1. third-person singular present active indicative of vomō

    Romanian

    Pronunciation

    • IPA(key): [voˈmit]

    Verb

    vomit

    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive of vomita

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