emphasis vs vehemence what difference

what is difference between emphasis and vehemence

English

Etymology

From Latin emphasis, from Ancient Greek ἔμφασις (émphasis, significance), from ἐμφαίνω (emphaínō, I present, I indicate), from ἐν- (en-, in) + φαίνω (phaínō, I show).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛmfəsɪs/
  • IPA(key): [ˈɛɱfəsɪs], [ˈeɱfəsɪs], [ˈɛɱfəsəs], [ˈeɱfəsəs]

Noun

emphasis (countable and uncountable, plural emphases)

  1. Special weight or forcefulness given to something considered important.
    He paused for emphasis before saying who had won.
  2. Special attention or prominence given to something.
    Anglia TV’s emphasis is on Norwich and district.
  3. Prominence given to a syllable or words, by raising the voice or printing in italic or underlined type.
    He used a yellow highlighter to indicate where to give emphasis in his speech.
  4. (phonology) The phonetic or phonological feature that distinguishes emphatic consonants from other consonants.
  5. (typography) The use of boldface, italics, or other such formatting to highlight text. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Related terms

  • emphasise, emphasize
  • emphatic

Translations

Anagrams

  • misshape

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἔμφασις (émphasis, significance).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈem.pʰa.sis/, [ˈɛmpʰäs̠ɪs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈem.fa.sis/, [ˈɛmfɑs̬is]

Noun

emphasis f (genitive emphasis); third declension

  1. emphasis

Declension

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

References

  • emphasis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • emphasis in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Etymology

From Middle French vehemence, from Latin vehementia (eagerness, strength), from vehemens (eager).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈviːəmən(t)s/, /ˈviːhəmən(t)s/

Noun

vehemence (usually uncountable, plural vehemences)

  1. An intense concentration, force or power.
    The bear attacked with vengeance and vehemence.
  2. A wild or turbulent ferocity or fury.
    His response was bursting with hatred and vehemence.
    • 2016 February 6, “Israel’s prickliness blocks the long quest for peace,” The National (retrieved 8 February 2016):
      This worrisome tendency was on display in recent weeks as Israelis reacted with striking vehemence to remarks by UN secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, and US ambassador to Israel, Daniel Shapiro.
  3. Eagerness, fervor, excessive strong feeling.
    • 1826, Mary Shelley, The Last Man, volume 3, chapter 1:
      I could not wonder at the vehemence of her care, her very soul was tenderness []

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:obstinacy

Related terms

  • vehemency
  • vehement

Translations

Further reading

  • vehemence in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • vehemence in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • vehemence at OneLook Dictionary Search

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