empire vs imperium what difference

what is difference between empire and imperium

English

Etymology

From Middle English empire, from Old French empire, empere, from Latin imperium, inperium (command, control, dominion, sovereignty, a dominion, empire), from imperare, inperare (to command, order), from in (in, on) + parare (to make ready, order). Doublet of empery and imperium.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ĕmʹpīə, ĕmʹpī-ə, IPA(key): /ˈɛmpaɪə/, /ˈɛmpaɪ.ə/
  • (General American) enPR: ĕmʹpīr’, ĕmʹpī’ər, IPA(key): /ˈɛmˌpaɪɹ/, /ˈɛmˌpaɪɚ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: em‧pire

Noun

empire (plural empires)

  1. A political unit, typically having an extensive territory or comprising a number of territories or nations (especially one comprising one or more kingdoms) and ruled by a single supreme authority.
  2. A political unit ruled by an emperor or empress.
  3. A group of states or other territories that owe allegiance to a foreign power.
  4. An expansive and powerful enterprise under the control of one person or group.
    • 2002, Evelyn L. Damore, The Rattle and Hiss of the Tin Gods, iUniverse (→ISBN), page 111:
      “Revenues for Jackson’s non-profit empire sky-rocketed from $4 million in 1997, to more than $14 million just two years later.”
    • 2009, Martin Short, The Rise of the Mafia, Kings Road Publishing (→ISBN)
      The Mafia never forgave Castro but Lansky had already laid the foundations of a mob gambling empire all over the Caribbean []
  5. (Absolute) control, dominion, sway.
    • 1881, François Guizot, The History of Civilization from the Fall of the Roman Empire to the French Revolution…, page 122:
      The brutality, the unthinking, the unreflecting character of the barbarians were so great, that the new faith, the new feelings with which they had been inspired, exercised but a very slight empire over them.
    • 2010, Stefania Tutino, Empire of Souls: Robert Bellarmine and the Christian Commonwealth, Oxford University Press (→ISBN), page 270:
      [] could gain some political strength for the pope, but in so doing the pope would lose the uniqueness and supremacy of his empire over souls: []

Derived terms

Related terms

  • emperor
  • empress
  • imperator
  • imperatrix
  • imperial
  • imperially
  • imperium
  • imperate
  • imperation


Translations

Further reading

  • empire in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • empire in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • empire at OneLook Dictionary Search

Adjective

empire (not comparable)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Empire.

Anagrams

  • E-Prime, epimer, permie, premie

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈempire/, [ˈe̞mpire̞]
  • Rhymes: -empire
  • Syllabification: em‧pi‧re

Noun

empire

  1. (architecture) Empire style

Declension


French

Etymology 1

From Old French, from Latin imperium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.piʁ/

Noun

empire m (plural empires)

  1. empire
  2. influence, authority, dominion

Derived terms

  • Céleste Empire
  • Empire byzantin
  • Empire des Fleurs
  • Empire du Milieu
  • Empire ottoman
  • Empire romain
  • Saint-Empire romain germanique
Related terms
  • empereur
  • impératrice
  • imperial
Descendants
  • Russian: ампи́р (ampír)

Etymology 2

Verb

empire

  1. first-person singular present indicative of empirer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of empirer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of empirer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of empirer
  5. second-person singular imperative of empirer

Further reading

  • “empire” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • périmé, primée

Italian

Alternative forms

  • empiere

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *implīre, present active infinitive of *impliō, from Latin impleō.

Verb

empìre (first-person singular present émpio, first-person singular past historic empìi or (less common) empiéi, past participle empìto or (less common) empiùto, auxiliary avere) (transitive)

  1. (uncommon, literally) to fill [+ di (object) = with]
  2. (figuratively) to fill, to stuff [+ di (object) = with]
  3. (archaic or literary) to satisfy, to satiate

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • riempire

Related terms

  • pieno

Anagrams

  • permei, premei

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • empyre, enpyre, empyere, empere, empeyr, empir, enpir, ampyre

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French empire, empere, from Latin imperium, inperium (command, control, dominion, sovereignty, a dominion, empire), from imperare, inperare (to command, order), from in (in, on) + parare (to make ready, order). Doublet of emperie.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛmˈpiːr(ə)/, /ɛmˈpɛːr(ə)/, /ˈɛmpiːr(ə)/, /am-/

Noun

empire

  1. Emperorship; the office, power or title of emperor.
  2. An empire; the domain of an emperor or empress.
  3. (rare) Total power or influence, especially when wielded by gods.
  4. (rare) A region of control; a field or zone.
  5. (rare, Christianity) God’s kingdom in the heavens.

Descendants

  • English: empire
  • Scots: empire

References

  • “empīre, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-03-24.

Old French

Etymology

From Latin imperium, inperium (command, control, dominion, sovereignty, a dominion, empire), from imperare, inperare (to command, order), from in (in, on) + parare (to make ready, order).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /emˈpi.rə/, (late) /amˈpi.rə/

Noun

empire m (oblique plural empires, nominative singular empires, nominative plural empire)

  1. empire

Descendants

  • Middle English: empire
    • English: empire
  • French: empire


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin imperium (power, command), from imperō (command, order), from im- (form of in) + parō (prepare, arrange; intend). Doublet of empery and empire.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɪəɹi.əm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɪɹi.əm/

Noun

imperium (countable and uncountable, plural imperia or imperiums)

  1. Supreme power; dominion.
  2. The right to command the force of the state; sovereignty.

Translations


Danish

Alternative forms

  • imperie

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin imperium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /emˈpeˀɐ̯iɔm/

Noun

imperium n (singular definite imperiet, plural indefinite imperier)

  1. empire

References

  • “imperium” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin imperium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɪmˈpeː.ri.ʏm/
  • Hyphenation: im‧pe‧ri‧um

Noun

imperium n (plural imperia, diminutive imperiumpje n)

  1. empire
    Synonyms: keizerrijk, rijk
  2. business empire

Related terms

  • imperiaal

Latin

Alternative forms

  • inperium

Etymology

From imperō (command, order), from im- (form of in) + parō (prepare, arrange; intend).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /imˈpe.ri.um/, [ɪmˈpɛɾiʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /imˈpe.ri.um/, [imˈpɛːrium]

Noun

imperium n (genitive imperiī or imperī); second declension

  1. The empire, state, imperial government, realm, dominion.
  2. The right or power to command or be in control; dominion.
  3. Absolute command over the empire (or other polity); sovereignty; sway.
    Synonym: diciō
  4. (military) Military authority, the command (of an army).
  5. The exercise of authority, rule, law, control, sovereignty.
    Synonyms: diciō, praescrīptum, rēgula
  6. A command, order, direction, bidding.
    Synonyms: ēdictiō, ēdictum, praeceptum

Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter).

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • imperium in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • imperium in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • imperium in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • imperium in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • imperium in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • imperium in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin imperium.

Noun

imperium n (definite singular imperiet, indefinite plural imperier, definite plural imperia or imperiene)

  1. an empire

References

  • “imperium” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin imperium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /imˈpeːriʉm/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

imperium n (definite singular imperiet, indefinite plural imperium, definite plural imperia)

  1. empire

References

  • “imperium” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From Latin imperium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /imˈpɛ.rʲjum/

Noun

imperium n

  1. (monarchy) empire (political unit, having numerous or extensive territories)

Declension

Related terms

  • (adjective) imperialny

Further reading

  • imperium in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • imperium in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin imperium, used in Swedish since 1845.

Noun

imperium n

  1. an empire (a state ruled by an emperor or czar)
    Synonyms: kejsardöme, kejsarrike, rike, stormaktsvälde
  2. an empire (a huge state or similar sphere of power)

Declension

Related terms

References

  • imperium in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • imperium in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

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