empyrean vs firmament what difference

what is difference between empyrean and firmament

English

Etymology

From Latin empȳreus, from Ancient Greek ἐμπύριος (empúrios), from ἐν (en, in) + πῦρ (pûr, fire) (whence English pyre).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛmˌpaɪˈɹiːn̩/, /ɛmˈpɪɹi.ən/

Noun

empyrean (plural empyreans)

  1. (historical) The region of pure light and fire; the highest heaven, where the pure element of fire was supposed by the ancients to exist: the same as the ether, the ninth heaven according to ancient astronomy.

Related terms

  • pyre

Adjective

empyrean (not comparable)

  1. Of the sky or the heavens; celestially refined.
    • 1700, Matthew Prior, Carmen Saeculare
      Yet upward she [the goddess] incessant flies;
      Resolv’d to reach the high empyrean Sphere.

Synonyms

  • empyreal

Translations

References

  • empyrean in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • William Dwight Whitney and Benjamin E[li] Smith, editors (1914), “empyrean”, in The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, volume II (D–Hoon), revised edition, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., OCLC 1078064371.

Further reading

  • empyrean on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Etymology

From Middle English firmament, furmament (heaven; sky), from Old French firmament (firmament), or from its etymon Latin firmāmentum (something that strengthens or supports; sky), from
firmāre (to strengthen) + -mentum (suffix indicating an instrument or medium, or the result of something). Firmāre is the present active infinitive of firmō (to make firm, strengthen), from firmus (firm, strong, stable), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰer- (to hold; to support).

The Latin word was used in the Vulgate version of the Bible to translate the
Ancient Greek στερέωμα (steréōma, foundation, framework; firmament) in the Septuagint (Greek Old Testament), which in turn was used to translate the Hebrew רָקִיעַ(rāqī́aʿ, celestial dome, vault of heaven), from the root ר־ק־ע(r-q-`); in Classical Syriac the similar root ܪ-ܩ-ܥ(r-q-ʿ) (“relating to compacting”) gave rise to ܪܩܝܥܐ(rəqīʿā, compact; firm; firmament, heavens, sky; celestial sphere).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfɜːməm(ə)nt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfɝməmənt/
  • Hyphenation: fir‧ma‧ment

Noun

firmament (countable and uncountable, plural firmaments)

  1. (usually uncountable, literary, poetic, also figuratively) The vault of the heavens, where the clouds, sun, moon, and stars can be seen; the heavens, the sky.
    Synonyms: (Britain, dialectal) lift, (poetic, archaic) welkin
  2. (countable) The field or sphere of an activity or interest.
  3. (uncountable, astronomy, historical) In the geocentric Ptolemaic system, the eighth celestial sphere which carried the fixed stars; (countable, by extension) any celestial sphere.
  4. (uncountable, obsolete except biblical) The abode of God and the angels; heaven.
  5. (countable, obsolete) A piece of jewellery worn in a headdress with numerous gems resembling stars in the sky.
  6. (countable, obsolete, also figuratively) A basis or foundation; a thing which lends strength or support.
  7. (countable, obsolete) The act or process of making firm or strengthening.

Derived terms

  • firmamental
  • firmamentary
  • unfirmamented

Translations

Notes

References

Further reading

  • firmament on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Firmament in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin firmāmentum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /fiɾ.məˈment/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /fir.məˈmen/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /fiɾ.maˈment/

Noun

firmament m (plural firmaments)

  1. firmament, heavens

Further reading

  • “firmament” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “firmament” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “firmament” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “firmament” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch firmament, from Latin firmāmentum, coined by Jerome in the Vulgate to render Ancient Greek στερέωμα (steréōma, firm or solid structure), which in turn translates Hebrew רקיע(vault of heaven).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌfɪr.maːˈmɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: fir‧ma‧ment
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

firmament n (plural firmamenten)

  1. firmament (vault or sphere of the heavens, seen as a solid object in older cosmologies; sky)
    Synonyms: gespan, hemelgespan, uitspansel

Descendants

  • Papiamentu: firmament (dated)

French

Etymology

From Middle French firmament, from Old French firmament, borrowed from Latin firmāmentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fiʁ.ma.mɑ̃/

Noun

firmament m (plural firmaments)

  1. firmament

Further reading

  • “firmament” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Nauruan

Etymology

From German Firmament, from Middle High German firmament, from Late Latin firmāmentum.

Noun

firmament

  1. firmament

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin firmāmentum.

Pronunciation

Noun

firmament m (plural firmaments)

  1. firmament, heavens

Further reading

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 484.

Polish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin firmāmentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʲirˈma.mɛnt/

Noun

firmament m inan

  1. celestial sphere, heaven, sky
  2. (archaic) foundation

Further reading

  • firmament in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French firmament, from Latin firmamentum.

Noun

firmament n (uncountable)

  1. firmament

Declension


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