empyrean vs sphere what difference

what is difference between empyrean and sphere

English

Etymology

From Latin empȳreus, from Ancient Greek ἐμπύριος (empúrios), from ἐν (en, in) + πῦρ (pûr, fire) (whence English pyre).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛmˌpaɪˈɹiːn̩/, /ɛmˈpɪɹi.ən/

Noun

empyrean (plural empyreans)

  1. (historical) The region of pure light and fire; the highest heaven, where the pure element of fire was supposed by the ancients to exist: the same as the ether, the ninth heaven according to ancient astronomy.

Related terms

  • pyre

Adjective

empyrean (not comparable)

  1. Of the sky or the heavens; celestially refined.
    • 1700, Matthew Prior, Carmen Saeculare
      Yet upward she [the goddess] incessant flies;
      Resolv’d to reach the high empyrean Sphere.

Synonyms

  • empyreal

Translations

References

  • empyrean in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • William Dwight Whitney and Benjamin E[li] Smith, editors (1914), “empyrean”, in The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, volume II (D–Hoon), revised edition, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., OCLC 1078064371.

Further reading

  • empyrean on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Alternative forms

  • sphære (archaic)
  • sphear (archaic)
  • spheare (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English spere, from Old French sphere, from Late Latin sphēra, earlier Latin sphaera (ball, globe, celestial sphere), from Ancient Greek σφαῖρα (sphaîra, ball, globe), of unknown origin. Not related to superficially similar Persian سپهر(sepehr, sky) (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /sfɪə/
  • (US) enPR: sfîr, IPA(key): /sfɪɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(r)

Noun

sphere (plural spheres)

  1. (mathematics) A regular three-dimensional object in which every cross-section is a circle; the figure described by the revolution of a circle about its diameter [from 14th c.].
  2. A spherical physical object; a globe or ball. [from 14th c.]
    • 2011, Piers Sellers, The Guardian, 6 July:
      So your orientation changes a little bit but it sinks in that the world is a sphere, and you’re going around it, sometimes under it, sideways, or over it.
  3. (astronomy, now rare) The apparent outer limit of space; the edge of the heavens, imagined as a hollow globe within which celestial bodies appear to be embedded. [from 14th c.]
    • 1635, John Donne, “His parting form her”:
      Though cold and darkness longer hang somewhere, / Yet Phoebus equally lights all the Sphere.
    • 1791, Erasmus Darwin, The Economy of Vegetation, J. Johnson, p. 190:
      Resistless rolls the illimitable sphere, / And one great circle forms the unmeasured year.
  4. (historical, astronomy, mythology) Any of the concentric hollow transparent globes formerly believed to rotate around the Earth, and which carried the heavenly bodies; there were originally believed to be eight, and later nine and ten; friction between them was thought to cause a harmonious sound (the music of the spheres). [from 14th c.]
    • , vol.1, p.153:
      It is more simplicitie to teach our children [] [t]he knowledge of the starres, and the motion of the eighth spheare, before their owne.
    • 1646, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, I.6:
      They understood not the motion of the eighth sphear from West to East, and so conceived the longitude of the Stars invariable.
  5. (mythology) An area of activity for a planet; or by extension, an area of influence for a god, hero etc. [from 14th c.]
  6. (figuratively) The region in which something or someone is active; one’s province, domain. [from 17th c.]
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.20:
      They thought – originally on grounds derived from religion – that each thing or person had its or his proper sphere, to overstep which is ‘unjust’.
  7. (geometry) The set of all points in three-dimensional Euclidean space (or n-dimensional space, in topology) that are a fixed distance from a fixed point [from 20th c.].
  8. (logic) The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied.

Synonyms

  • (object): ball, globe, orb
  • (region of activity): area, domain, field, orbit, sector
  • (in geometry): 3-sphere (geometry), 2-sphere (topology)
  • (astronomy: apparent surface of the heavens): See celestial sphere
  • (astronomy: anything visible on the apparent surface of the heavens): See celestial body

Derived terms

  • blogosphere
  • ensphere
  • sphere of influence
  • sphere of interest

Related terms

  • atmosphere
  • hemisphere
  • ionosphere
  • planisphere
  • spherical
  • spheroid
  • stratosphere
  • troposphere

Translations

Verb

sphere (third-person singular simple present spheres, present participle sphering, simple past and past participle sphered)

  1. (transitive) To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to ensphere.
  2. (transitive) To make round or spherical; to perfect.

See also

  • ball (in topology)
  • Mathworld article on the sphere
  • PlanetMath article on the sphere

Anagrams

  • Hesper, herpes, pesher, pheers

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • sphaere
  • spere

Noun

sphere f (plural spheres)

  1. sphere (shape)

Descendants

  • French: sphère

Old French

Alternative forms

  • espere
  • esphere
  • spere

Noun

sphere f (oblique plural spheres, nominative singular sphere, nominative plural spheres)

  1. sphere (shape)

Descendants

  • English: sphere
  • French: sphère

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (sphere, supplement)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial