en vs nut what difference

what is difference between en and nut

English

Etymology 1

Abbreviation.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɛn/, /i.ɛn/

Noun

en

  1. Abbreviation of English.

Etymology 2

The name of the letter comes from Latin en. The typographic sense dates to 1793.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: ĕn, IPA(key): /ɛn/
  • Rhymes: -ɛn
    • (pinpen merger) IPA(key): /ɪn/
    • Homophones: in, inn

Noun

en (plural ens)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N.
  2. (typography) A unit of measurement equal to half an em (half the height of the type in use).
Derived terms
  • (typography): en dash
  • (typography): en quad
  • (typography): en space
  • ennage
Translations
See also
  • (Latin-script letter names) letter; a, bee, cee, dee, e, ef, gee, aitch, i, jay, kay, el, em, en, o, pee, cue, ar, ess, tee, u, vee, double-u, ex, wye, zee / zed

Etymology 3

From French.

Pronunciation

  • (imitating the French pronunciation) IPA(key): [ɑ̃], [õ]
  • (anglicised) IPA(key): /ɒn/, /ɑn/

Preposition

en

  1. Used in various phrases borrowed from French or formed as if borrowed from French (see “Derived terms” below).
Derived terms

Etymology 4

From Old English hine

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ən/

Pronoun

en

  1. (dialectal, Newfoundland) him
  2. (dialectal, Newfoundland) it (when the thing being referred to is masculine)

Anagrams

  • -ne-, NE, Ne., ne, ne., ,

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Verb

en

  1. (intransitive) to be, exist

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[3], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch en.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /ən/

Conjunction

en

  1. and
  2. well

Alemannic German

Etymology

From Middle High German ein, from Old High German ein, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos. Cognate with German ein, German Low German en, ein, Dutch een, English one, Icelandic einn, Swedish en.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ən/

Article

en m

  1. (indefinite) a, an

Declension

  • Short forms of the dative – eme, ere, eme – are also common.

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin in, from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in).

Preposition

en

  1. in

Usage notes

  • The preposition en contracts to n’ before a word beginning with a vowel or h-: n’Asturies (in Asturias), n’honor (in honor)

Derived terms


Aukan

Etymology

From English and.

Noun

en

  1. and

Azerbaijani

Etymology

From Proto-Turkic *ēn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [en]

Noun

en (definite accusative eni, plural enlər)

  1. width
    Synonym: genişlik

Declension

Derived terms

  • en dairəsi (latitude)

References

  • “en” in Obastan.com.

Breton

Contraction

en

  1. e (preposition “in”) + un (indefinite article “a(n)”)
  2. e (preposition “in”) + an (definite article “the”)

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Central) IPA(key): /ən/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /en/

Etymology 1

From the final syllable of Latin domine (Mister).

Article

en m sg (elided n’, feminine na)

  1. (Eastern Catalan) Personal article used before masculine given names instead of the definite article el.
Usage notes
  • While this article (and its feminine counterpart na) is standard in Balearic Catalan, in other Eastern Catalan dialects its use is waning, and the elided of the definite article, l’, is used before names beginning with vowels. There is no plural personal article, so the plural definite article els is used in all dialects.
Derived terms
  • can (contraction of ca and ne)

Etymology 2

From Old Occitan, from Latin in (in, inside), from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in).

Preposition

en

  1. in

Etymology 3

From Latin inde (thence). Compare French en, Italian ne.

Pronoun

en (proclitic, contracted n’, enclitic ne, contracted enclitic ‘n)

  1. Represents an indeterminate number or quantity of a given noun.
  2. Represents a place (associated with the action described by the verb) that would be introduced by the preposition de.
  3. Replaces a phrase introduced by the preposition de.
  4. Replaces the object of a causative verb.
Usage notes
  • en cannot be used more than once as the object of a given verb.
  • While en is usually used to replace phrases beginning with the preposition de, adverbial phrases (e.g., de pressa) are replaced with hi.
  • en is sometimes used instead of ho to replace an adjective or indefinite noun as the predicate of a verb.
  • en is sometimes used popularly to add emphasis to a sentence: in this sense, it has no translation in English.
  • en is the reinforced (reforçada) form of the pronoun. It is used before verbs beginning with consonant.
Declension

See also

  • hi
  • ho

Further reading

  • “en” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Central Franconian

Etymology 1

From Old High German in.

Alternative forms

  • on, ön (Eifel)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Preposition

en

  1. (most dialects) in; into

Adverb

en

  1. (most dialects) in

Etymology 2

From Old High German indi.

Alternative forms

  • on, un (predominant)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Conjunction

en

  1. (some western dialects) and

Etymology 3

From Old High German ein.

Alternative forms

  • e (neuter and in some dialects masculine, before non-dental consonants)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ən/

Article

en (indefinite)

  1. (most dialects) feminine nominative and accusative
  2. (most dialects) neuter nominative and accusative, used before vowels and alternatively before h and dental consonants
  3. (some dialects) masculine nominative, used before vowels and alternatively before h and dental consonants
  4. (some dialects) masculine accusative, used before vowels and alternatively before h and dental consonants

Etymology 4

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ən/

Pronoun

en (personal, reduced)

  1. (most dialects) him; masculine accusative
  2. (some dialects) he; masculine nominative
  3. (most dialects) them; plural dative

Chamorro

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Pronoun

en

  1. ye, you (plural)

Usage notes

  • en is used as a subject of a transitive verb in realis mood, and as a subject with all verbs in irrealis mood. It is in complementary distribution with hamyo, which is generally used as an object of a transitive verb, and also as a subject of an intransitive verb in realis mood.

See also

References

  • Donald M. Topping (1973) Chamorro Reference Grammar[4], Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.

Chuukese

Pronoun

en

  1. Second-person singular pronoun; you

See also

Determiner

en (plural ekkan)

  1. this (not in possession of the speaker)

Cimbrian

Pronoun

en

  1. Alternative form of in (him)

Further reading

  • “en” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Crimean Tatar

Noun

en

  1. width

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛn]

Noun

en n

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N.

Further reading

  • en in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • en in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Dalmatian

Alternative forms

  • in

Etymology

From Latin in.

Preposition

en

  1. in

Related terms

  • nel, nei, nela

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse einn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one, some), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/, [en], (stressed) [ˈeːˀn]

Article

en (neuter et)

  1. a, an

Numeral

en (neuter et)

  1. one

Pronoun

en or én (neuter et or ét, definite ene)

  1. one

Usage notes

  • Used as the oblique form of the generic pronoun man:

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • (stressed) IPA(key): /ɛn/
  • (unstressed) IPA(key): /ən/
  • Hyphenation: en
  • Rhymes: -ɛn

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch ende, from Old Dutch ande, inde, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Conjunction

en

  1. and
  2. well, so
  3. (mathematics) plus, and
Alternative forms
  • ende (archaic)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: en
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: an
  • Jersey Dutch: en
  • Negerhollands: en, an
  • Petjo: en
See also
  • dus
  • maar
  • of

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch ne, en, from Old Dutch ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

Adverb

en

  1. (now Belgium, colloquial, obsolete elsewhere) not (often with another negator, see usage notes)
    • 1544, “Van proper Janneken” (song 123), in Dieuwke E. van der Poel, Dirk Geirnaert, Hermina Joldersma, J.B. Oosterman & Louis Peter Grijp (eds.) Het Antwerps liedboek, vol. 1, Lannoo (publ. 2004), page 283.
    • 1632, Jacob Cats, Spiegel van den ouden ende nieuwen tijt, bestaende uyt spreeckwoorden ende sinspreucken, “Een rotten appel in de mande, maeckt oock het gave fruyt te schande.”, in J. van Vloten (ed.), Alle de werken, vol. 1, 1862, page 649.
    • “Herr Halewyn”, A.H. Hoffmann von Fallersleben, Horae Belgicae, page 41.
    • circa 1860, Guido Gezelle, “Gij zegt dat ‘t vlaamsch te niet zal gaan”.
  2. (obsolete) only, merely, no other than, none other than (together with maar)
Usage notes
  • In historical usage, en is always used directly before the finite verb. When used to negate it is commonly accompanied by another negator: gij en zult niet stelen (“thou shalt not steal”), en wat er niet en deugt (“and what is not of decent quality”), ik en zoude certein geen ander boelken kiezen (“I would certainly not choose another girlfriend”). Also when used as a stand-alone negator or when combined with maar, it still stands directly before the finite verb. Use of the particle does not trigger a change in the word order.
  • In Belgian Dutch it is still sometimes used in certain regional lects and in the tussentaal (informal registers influenced by both Standard Belgian Dutch and the regional lects). Details and frequency of use depend on what regional language variety influences a given speaker’s idiom, as well as on the speaker’s preferences.
    • In West Flemish usage broadly conforms to historical use: the negation particle may be used along with other negators, independentely or it may be omitted. It is also used as a stand-alone negator to contradict a previous statement that was phrased with positive polarity: Gij zegt dat ‘t Vlaams te niet zal gaan: / ‘t en zal! (“You say that Flemish will go extinct: / no, it won’t!”)
    • In Belgian Brabantian it is frequently omitted, but it may also be used directly before another negator rather than before the finite verb: en niet.
  • In contemporary Netherlands Dutch the use of the particle is limited to old proverbs, such as wat baten kaars en bril als de uil niet zien en wil.

Anagrams

  • ne

Esperanto

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/
  • Hyphenation: en

Preposition

en

  1. in, within, inside
  2. into (when followed by a noun or phrase in the accusative case)

Derived terms

  • ene

Fala

Etymology

From Old Portuguese en, from Latin in (in), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én.

Preposition

en

  1. in

Finnish

Etymology

See ei. Has the regular verb ending -n.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈen/, [ˈe̞n]
  • Rhymes: -en
  • Syllabification: en

Verb

en

  1. The first-person singular form of the negative verb (negation verb). The English translations include do not/don’t and not (with auxiliary verbs and be).

Usage notes

  • The negative verb is used with the connegative form of the main verb. That form is identical to the second-person singular imperative in the indicative present. The potential mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -ne-, and the conditional mood connegative ends in the marker for the mood, -isi-. In the indicative past, conditional past and potential past, the active past participle singular (ending –ut/-yt) is used. The connegative form of the main verb is always used without the personal suffix.
  • Usage of en:
  • Indicative:
  • Minä näen. (I see.) → Minä en näe. (I do not see.)
  • Minä näin. (I saw.) → Minä en nähnyt. (I did not see.)
  • Minä olen nähnyt. (I have seen.) → Minä en ole nähnyt. (I have not seen.)
  • Minä olin nähnyt. (I had seen.) → Minä en ollut nähnyt. (I had not seen.)
  • Conditional:
  • Minä näkisin. (I would see.) → Minä en näkisi. (I would not see.)
  • Minä olisin nähnyt. (I would have seen.) → Minä en olisi nähnyt. (I would not have seen.)
  • Potential:
  • Minä nähnen. (I probably see.) → Minä en nähne. (I probably do not see.)
  • Minä lienen nähnyt. (I have probably seen.) → Minä en liene nähnyt. (I have probably not seen.)

Conjugation

  • The negation verb has no infinitive form.
  • Indicative, conditional and potential moods use the indicative forms (stem e-), for which the verb is conjugated only in person.
  • In the imperative mood the negation verb has the stem äl-.
  • An archaic optative mood exists and is used mainly in poetry.

Anagrams

  • -ne, -ne-, ne

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃/
  • Homophones: an, ans
  • Rhymes: -ɑ̃

Etymology 1

From Middle French en, from Old French en, from Latin in, from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in).

Preposition

en

  1. in (used to indicate space, also see usage notes)
  2. to (indicates direction towards certain very large locations, see usage notes)
  3. by (used to indicate means)
  4. as
  5. at (used to describe an ability)
  6. of, made of (used to describe composition)
  7. in (during the following time (used for months and years))
  8. (followed by a gerund) while
  9. (followed by a gerund) by, in (describing a way of getting something)
  10. in (used to describe color)
  11. in (used to describe feelings)
  12. in (as part of something)
Usage notes
  • En in the sense of while is often not translated into English.
  • When referring to location in countries, provinces, or similar subdivisions in sense 1 and direction in sense 2, en must be used when the name for that very large location is either a feminine singular noun or a vowel-initial masculine singular noun. If the name for the very large location is a consonant-initial masculine singular noun, au is used, while if the name of the very large location is plural, aux is used.

Further reading

  • “en” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Etymology 2

From Latin inde (thence). Compare Catalan en, Italian ne

Pronoun

en ?

  1. Used as the object of a verb to indicate an indefinite quantity; of it, of them. Replaces the partitive article (du, de la, etc.)
  2. Adverbial preposition indicating movement away from a place already mentioned.
Related terms

Anagrams

  • N.-É., NE, , ne,

Galician

Etymology

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese en, from Latin in, from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eŋ/

Preposition

en

  1. in
  2. When preceding a verb or a complement of a verb it can denote a unfinished or continued action:
    • 1822, anonymous, A Parola Polêteca:
      En escoitalo, señor tio Calacú, xà o peléxo do meu corpo tembra. Sei que á tanta agua que acarrexóu amolentoulle os miolos, é por eso louquéa

      While listening to you, my sir uncle Pumpkin, my body’s skin trembles. Perhaps the much water you have carried softened you brain, and therefore you are going insane
    • 1853, Xosé Manuel Pintos, A Gaita Gallega:
      xa morder ti ben non podes
      con tal podrico nos dentes,
      inda no pan teño mentes
      seique non podes chanchar

      you can no longer aptly eat
      with such rottenness in you teeth,
      even bread, I think,
      probably you cannot gnaw [chanchar means “bite”, but en preceding pan, “bread”, implies a repeated action]

Usage notes

  • The preposition en contracts to n- before articles, before third-person tonic pronouns, and before the determiners algún and outro.

Derived terms

  • na, nas, no, nos
  • nalgún, nalgunha, nalgunhas, nalgúns
  • nel, nela, nelas, neles
  • nese, nesa, neses, nesas, niso
  • neste, nesta, nestes, nestas, nisto
  • noutra, noutras, noutro, noutros
  • nestoutro, nestoutra, nestoutros, nestoutras
  • nun, nunha, nunhas, nuns
  • naquel, naquela, naqueles, naquelas

Adverb

en

  1. while; as soon as (followed by the gerund of a verb, expresses immediacy or simultaneity)
    • 1295, R. Lorenzo (ed.), La traducción gallega de la Crónica General y de la Crónica de Castilla. Ourense: I. E. O. P. F., page 111:
      Et o conde, en chegando et ferindo logo ẽnos mouros, todo en hũu o fezo

      And the count, [just] arriving, and hurting promptly the Moors, all in one he did that
    • 1460, Rui Vasques, Corónica de Iria:
      en leendo perlos llibros algũus de canõicas antijgas, et preujlegios goticos dos santos catholicos et deuotos bispos de Yria et porla Escriptura, achey o fundamento para rreduzir aa memoria dos homes quanto durarõ çertas ydades

      [while] reading books, some of them of ancient canons, and Gothic privileges of the saint Catholic and devout bishops of Iria, and through the Bible, I found the foundation for reducing to the mind of men for how long some ages lasted
    • 1461, X. Ferro Couselo (ed.), A vida e a fala dos devanceiros. Escolma de documentos en galego dos séculos XIII ao XVI. 2 vols. Vigo: Galaxia, page 141:
      dito testigo en seendo moço pequeno con seu tyo Afonso Dominges, guardando o gaando en Curro do Moyño, que le dixera o dito Afonso Domingees “bees, por aquy se parte ho término do conde do de Juan d’Estúñiga

      said witness [while] being a young boy together with his uncle Afonso Domínguez, watching the cattle in Curro do Muíño, he was told by said Afonso Domínguez: “you see, here the term of the count limits with that of Xoán de Estúñiga

References

  • “en” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI – ILGA 2006-2012.
  • “en” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “en” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “en” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

German Low German

Alternative forms

  • ‘n, -‘n
  • (in other dialects, including Low Prussian) een
  • (in some dialects) ein
  • (East Pomeranian) ain

Etymology

From Middle Low German ên, from Old Saxon ēn. Compare Dutch een, German ein, West Frisian ien, English one.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛɪ̯n/, /ˈeːn/, /ˈæɪ̯n/, /ˈeːɪ̯n/

Article

en m or n (indefinite article)

  1. (in some dialects) a, an

Numeral

en

  1. (in some dialects, including Low Prussian) one (1)

See also

  • Dutch Low Saxon: een
  • Plautdietsch een, (cardinal number) eent

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French un (one), from Latin ūnus (one).

Numeral

en

  1. one

Synonyms

  • youn

See also

  • zewo 0
  • de 2
  • twa 3
  • kat 4
  • senk 5
  • sis 6
  • sèt 7
  • uit 8
  • nèf 9
  • dis 10
  • san 100

Hunsrik

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /n̩/, /eːn/

Determiner

en (indefinite)

  1. a, an

Pronoun

en

  1. unstressed accusative of er: him.

Inflection

Declension

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Icelandic

Adverb

en

  1. how

Conjunction

en

  1. but
  2. than (with an adjective in the comparative)

Usage notes

  • Sometimes Icelandic uses en where English would use and:
    Rannsókn embættis sérstaks saksóknara á meintum innherjasvikum Baldurs Guðlaugssonar stóð yfir í rúmlega ár, en FME kærði málið með bréfi til embættisins hinn 9. júlí á síðasta ári.
  • In the sentence

Derived terms

References


Ido

Etymology

From French en, Spanish en, from Latin in, inde from Proto-Indo-European *én (in).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Preposition

en

  1. in

Ingrian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Verb

en

  1. first-person singular present of ei

References

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[5]

Japanese

Romanization

en

  1. Rōmaji transcription of えん

Jersey Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch een, from Old Dutch ēn, ein, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Article

en

  1. the

Etymology 2

Cognate to Dutch en (and). Compare English and.

Conjunction

en

  1. and
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      Hai waz nît tevrêde täus en []

      He was not content at home and []

Kabuverdianu

Etymology

From Portuguese em.

Preposition

en

  1. in

Kott

Etymology

From Proto-Yeniseian *ʔäń (˜x-) (“wave”).

Noun

en (plural ēnaŋ)

  1. wave

Noun

en

  1. plural of ei

Kriol

Etymology

From English and.

Conjunction

en

  1. and

Ladino

Preposition

en (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling אין‎)

  1. in

Latin

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eːn/, [eːn]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /en/, [ɛn]

Interjection

ēn

  1. lookǃ beholdǃ (presenting something in a lively or indignant manner)
  2. reallyǃ? (surprise or anger in questions)
  3. come onǃ (exhortation to action in imperatives)

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /en/, [ɛn]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /en/, [ɛn]

Noun

en f (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter N.
Usage notes
  • Multiple Latin names for the letter N, n have been suggested. The most common is en or a syllabic n, although there is some evidence which also supports, as names for the letter, , ən, , and even (in the fourth- or fifth-century first Antinoë papyrus, which gives Greek transliterations of the Latin names of the Roman alphabet’s letters) ιννε (inne).
Coordinate terms
  • (Latin-script letter names) littera; ā, bē, cē, dē, ē, ef, gē, hā / *acca, ī, kā, el, em, en, ō, pē, kū, er, es, tē, ū, ix / īx / ex, ȳ / ī graeca / ȳpsīlon, zēta

References

  • en in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • en in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63

Etymology 3

Preposition

en

  1. Early Latin form of in (in)

Latvian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛn]

Noun

en m (invariable)

  1. The Latvian name of the Latin script letter N/n.

See also

  • Latvian letter names:
    a (A), garais ā (Ā), (B), (C), čē (Č), (D), e (E), garais ē (Ē), ef (F), (G), ģē (Ģ), (H), i (I), garais ī (Ī), (J), (K), ķē (Ķ), el (L), (Ļ), em (M), en (N), (Ņ), o (O), (P), er (R), es (S), (Š), (T), u (U), garais ū (Ū), (V), (Z), žē (Ž)

Leonese

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Preposition

en

  1. in

Usage notes

When followed by an article, en is combined with the next word to give the following combined forms:

References

  • AEDLL

Lule Sami

Verb

en

  1. first-person dual present of ij

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German ein, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/, [ən]
  • Rhymes: -ən

Article

en m or n

  1. Indefinite article; a, an

Declension

Pronoun

en

  1. unstressed form of hien
  2. unstressed form of hinnen

Declension

Usage notes

  • Due to the Eifel Rule, the final -n is lost when the following word begins with a consonant other than <d>, <h>, <n>, <t> or <z>.

Mandarin

Romanization

en

  1. Nonstandard spelling of ēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of én.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of ěn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of èn.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Conjunction

en

  1. Alternative form of ende

Middle English

Preposition

en

  1. Alternative form of in (in)

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French [Term?], from Latin in.

Preposition

en

  1. on; on to

Descendants

  • French: en

Middle Low German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *ne (not).

Pronunciation

Unknown, possibly IPA(key): /ɛn/ or IPA(key): /ən/.

Particle

en m

  1. not; negates a verb, usage is facultative if it leads to a double negative
  2. unless

Alternative forms

  • ne (older, Eastphalian)

Movima

Verb

en

  1. to stand

Further reading

  • http://webdoc.ubn.ru.nl/mono/h/haude_k/gramofmo.pdf
  • https://web.archive.org/web/20170516185108/http://www.ioling.org/booklets/iol-2007-indiv-prob.en.pdf

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse einn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one, some), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eːn/ (stressed)
  • IPA(key): /ən/ (unstressed)
  • Rhymes: -eːn, -ən
  • Hyphenation: en
  • Homophone: -en

Article

en m (feminine ei or (non-standard since 1938) e, neuter et)

  1. a, an (indefinite article)

Numeral

en m (feminine ei, neuter ett, stressed form én)

  1. one

Derived terms

See also

  • ein (Nynorsk)

References

  • “en” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Conjunction

en

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 1901; superseded by enn

Etymology 2

Article

en

  1. (dialectal, nonstandard) Alternative form of ein

Etymology 3

en

  1. Used as part of set phrases from French

Etymology 4

en

  1. Used as part of the expression stopp en hal

Old French

Alternative forms

  • in (10th century)

Etymology

From Latin in.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/

Preposition

en

  1. in; inside
  2. on; upon
  3. in (experiencing an emotion, a feeling, etc.)
  4. in (indicates a language)

Descendants

  • Middle French: en
    • French: en
  • Norman: en

Old Frisian

Alternative forms

  • ān
  • (Late Old Frisian) een

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *ain. Cognates include Old English ān and Old Saxon ēn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈeːn/, [ˈɛːn]

Numeral

ēn m or n

  1. one

Article

ēn m or n

  1. a, an

Declension

Descendants

  • North Frisian:
    Föhr-Amrum:

    Föhr: een m, ian f or n
    Amrum: ään m, ian f or n
    Goesharde:

    Hoolmer: åån m, iin f or n
    Hoorninger: aan m, iin f or n
    Halligen: aon m, ian f or n
    Heligoland: iaan, jaan
    Mooring: ån m, iinj f or n
    Sylt: jen
    Wiedingharde: oan m, iin f or n
  • Saterland Frisian: aan m, een f or n
  • West Frisian: ien

References

  • Bremmer, Rolf H. (2009) An Introduction to Old Frisian: History, Grammar, Reader, Glossary, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, →ISBN

Old Norse

Conjunction

en

  1. but
  2. (as a copulative): and
  3. than

Synonyms

  • (and): ok
  • (than): an

References

  • en in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Occitan

Pronoun

en

  1. of it; of them
    • 12th century, Bernard de Ventadour, Can vei la lauzeta mover
      Ailas! Tan cuidava saber
      D’amor, e tan petit en sai,

      Alas! I thought I knew so much
      about love, and I know so little [of it]!

Old Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin in (in), from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈẽ/

Preposition

en

  1. in
    • Como hũa moller q̇ iogaua os dados en pulla lançou hũa pedra aa omagen de ſ[ant]a mari[a] por q̇ perdera ⁊ parou un angeo de pedra que y eſtava a mão ⁊ reçibiu o colpe.

      How a woman who was playing dice in Apulia threw a stone at the statue of Holy Mary because she had lost, and an angel of stone which was there reached out its hand and received the blow.

Descendants

  • Fala: en
  • Galician: en
  • Portuguese: em

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *ain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛːn/

Numeral

en m

  1. one
    • (Heliand, verse 2637)

Article

en m

  1. a, an (rarely used)

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German: ên, ein
    • Low German:
      • German Low German: een (Hamburgisch)
      • Westphalian:
        Lippisch: eun
        Ravensbergisch: åine
        Sauerländisch: ên
        Westmünsterländisch: een, eene, ne
    • Plautdietsch: een

Old Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse einn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz, from Proto-Indo-European *óynos.

Numeral

ēn m or f

  1. one

Pennsylvania German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Etymology

Compare German ein.

Article

en (indefinite)

  1. a, an

Declension

Pronoun

en

  1. him

Declension


Slovene

Etymology

Contraction of earlier êden, from Proto-Slavic *(j)edinъ, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one, single).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ́n/

Numeral

ȅn

  1. one

Usage notes

The form êden is used when the word does not modify a noun directly, but stands in predicate position. When counting or reciting numbers, the feminine form êna is normally used.

Inflection

Derived terms

  • enôta

Spanish

Etymology

From Old Spanish en, from Latin in, from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in). Cognate with Old English in and English in.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en/, [ẽn]
  • IPA(key): /ˈem/, [ˈẽm] (before b, v, p)
  • Rhymes: -en

Preposition

en

  1. in, at, on
  2. in (a time)
  3. in (a language)
  4. used after some verbs and translated by various prepositions in English
  5. in (in various expressions)

Sranan Tongo

Etymology

From older hem, from English him.

Alternative forms

  • hem (obsolete)

Pronoun

en

  1. Third-person singular possessive determiner/pronoun; his, her, its

Pronoun

en

  1. Third-person singular object pronoun; him, her, it
  2. Contrastive variant of a; he, she, it.

Sumerian

Romanization

en

  1. Romanization of ???? (en)

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish ēn, æn, from Old Norse einn, from Proto-Germanic *ainaz (one, some), from Proto-Indo-European *óynos (one).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnː/
  • Homophones: än, N, n

Pronoun

en (genitive ens)

  1. one; object form of man (=one)
  2. one (see usage notes)
Usage notes

En has in recent years been used as a more gender-conscious alternative to the impersonal pronoun man. The development is in some ways parallel to the gender-neutral pronoun hen. Usage is common among certain speaker groups, but not universally acknowledged in the standard language.[7] Previously it has also been used in some dialects.

Declension

Pronunciation 2

  • IPA(key): (not before g) /ɛnː/, IPA(key): (before g) /ɛŋː/
  • Homophones: än, N, n

Numeral

en (neuter ett)

  1. one
Coordinate terms
Related terms

Article

en c (neuter ett)

  1. the indefinite article: a, an.
Declension
  • en and ett are invariable in the singular, as nominative en konung (a king) and genitive en konungs (a king’s).
  • The genitive enes and the dative enom are dated.

Etymology 2

From earlier ene (sometimes also ener), from Old Norse einir.

Pronunciation 3

  • IPA(key): /eːn/

Noun

en c

  1. juniper
Declension
Related terms

References

  • han in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)
  • en in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

Anagrams

  • -ne

Turkish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Etymology 1

From Ottoman Turkish ان(en), from Old Turkic ????(), Proto-Turkic *ēn (breadth, width).

Noun

en (definite accusative eni, plural enler)

  1. width
  2. a cachet on an animal or bonded goods
Declension

References

  • Nişanyan, Sevan (2002–), “en2”, in Nişanyan Sözlük

Etymology 2

From Ottoman Turkish اڭ(), from Old Turkic ????(ŋ /eŋ/), from Proto-Turkic [Term?]. Cognate with Azerbaijani ən, Kyrgyz эң (), Tuvan эң (), Uzbek eng.

Adverb

en

  1. Forms the superlative of the following adjective.

Veps

Verb

en

  1. first-person singular present of ei

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Noun

en f (plural eniau)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N.

Mutation

See also

  • (Latin-script letter names) llythyren; a, bi, ec, èch, di, èdd, e, èf, èff, èg, eng, aetsh, i/i dot, je, ce, el, èll, em, en, o, pi, ffi, ciw, er, rhi, ès, ti, èth, u/u bedol, fi, w, ecs, y, sèd (Category: cy:Latin letter names)

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian and, ende, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/, /ɪn/

Conjunction

en

  1. and

Further reading

  • “en”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Zou

Etymology 1

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *ʔen, from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *ken. Cognates include Chinese (jiàn) and Tibetan མཁྱེན་པ (mkhyen pa).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /en˧˥/

Verb

én

  1. (intransitive) to look

Etymology 2

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *ʔan (vegetables), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *h(y)an.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ən˧˥/

Noun

én

  1. food
  2. meal

References

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 41


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /nʌt/, enPR: nŭt
    • (California, General New Zealand, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [nɐt]
  • Rhymes: -ʌt

Etymology 1

From Middle English nute, note, from Old English hnutu, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts (nut) (compare West Frisian nút, Dutch noot, German Nuss, Danish nød, Swedish nöt, Norwegian nøtt), from Proto-Indo-European *knew- (compare Irish cnó, Latin nux (walnut)).

Noun

nut (plural nuts)

  1. A hard-shelled seed.
  2. A piece of metal, usually square or hexagonal in shape, with a hole through it having machined internal threads, intended to be screwed onto a bolt or other threaded shaft.
    Hypernym: fastener
    Hyponyms: acorn nut, barrel nut, square nut, wing nut
    • 1998, Brian Hingley, Furniture Repair & Refinishing – Page 95[1]
      As the bolt tightens into the nut, it pulls the tenon on the side rail into the mortise in the bedpost and locks them together. There are also some European beds that reverse the bolt and nut by setting the nut into the bedpost with the bolt inserted into a slotted area in the side of the rail.
  3. (slang) A crazy person.
    Synonyms: loony, nutbag, nutcase, nutter; see also Thesaurus:mad person
  4. (slang) The head.
    Synonyms: bonce, noodle
  5. (US, slang) Monthly expense to keep a venture running.
  6. (US, slang) The amount of money necessary to set up some venture; set-up costs.
    • 1971, Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Harper Perennial (2005), page 11:
      My attorney was waiting in a bar around the corner. “This won’t make the nut,” he said, “unless we have unlimited credit.”
  7. (US, slang) A stash of money owned by an extremely rich investor, sufficient to sustain a high level of consumption if all other money is lost.
  8. (music, lutherie) On stringed instruments such as guitars and violins, the small piece at the peghead end of the fingerboard that holds the strings at the proper spacing and, in most cases, the proper height.
  9. (typography slang) En, a unit of measurement equal to half of the height of the type in use.
  10. (dated, Britain, slang) An extravagantly fashionable young man. [1910s-1920s]
    • 1914, “Saki”, ‘The Dreamer’, Beasts and Superbeasts, Penguin 2000 (Complete Short Stories), p. 323:
      ‘You are not going to be what they call a Nut, are you?’ she inquired with some anxiety, partly with the idea that a Nut would be an extravagance which her sister’s small household would scarcely be justified in incurring […].
  11. (vulgar, slang, chiefly plural) A testicle.
    Synonyms: ball, (taboo slang) bollock, nads
  12. (vulgar, slang, uncountable) Semen, ejaculate.
  13. (vulgar, slang, countable) Orgasm, ejaculation; especially release of semen.
    • 2020, Dontavious Robinson, Gangster Mission Part One, Page Publishing, Inc (→ISBN)
      [] feelin’ her pussy grippin’ his dick as her nut lubricated him []
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:nut.
  14. (colloquial) An extreme enthusiast.
  15. (climbing) A shaped piece of metal, threaded by a wire loop, which is jammed in a crack in the rockface and used to protect a climb. (Originally, machine nuts [sense #2] were used for this purpose.)
    • 2005, Tony Lourens, Guide to climbing page 88
      When placing nuts, always look for constrictions within the crack, behind which the nut can be wedged.
  16. (poker, only in attributive use) The best possible hand of a certain type, for instance: “nut straight”, “nut flush”, and “nut full house”. Compare nuts (the best possible hand available).
  17. (firearms) The tumbler of a gunlock.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  18. (nautical) A projection on each side of the shank of an anchor, to secure the stock in place.
  19. (archaic) A small rounded cake or cookie.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

nut (third-person singular simple present nuts, present participle nutting, simple past and past participle nutted or (nonstandard) nut)

  1. (mostly in the form “nutting”) To gather nuts.
  2. (Britain, transitive, slang) To hit deliberately with the head; to headbutt.
    Synonyms: butt, Glasgow kiss, Liverpool kiss, loaf
  3. (slang, mildly vulgar) To orgasm; to ejaculate.
    Synonyms: blow a nut, bust a nut; see also Thesaurus:ejaculate
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:nut.

Etymology 2

Interjection

nut

  1. (Scotland, colloquial) No.
    • 1995, Alan Warner, Morvern Callar, Vintage 2015, p. 26:
      Did you like them boys? I goes.
      Nut. She shook her hair.
      Neither?
      Nut. Right townies.

Anagrams

  • NTU, Tun, tun

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [nʊ̠t]

Noun

nut (plural [please provide])

  1. use, benefit

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Dutch

Etymology

From the adjective Middle Dutch nutte (useful), or from Middle Dutch nut (yield), from Old Dutch *nut, from Proto-Germanic *nutją, *nutjō (profit, yield, utility), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to seize; grasp; use).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nʏt/
  • Hyphenation: nut
  • Rhymes: -ʏt

Noun

nut n (uncountable)

  1. use, point, utility, sense
    Synonym: zin
  2. benefit
    Synonym: voordeel

Derived terms

  • Nutsman
  • nuttig
  • nutteloos

Adjective

nut (comparative nutter, superlative nutst)

  1. (obsolete) useful
    Synonym: nuttig

Inflection

Derived terms

  • onnut

Middle English

Adverb

nut

  1. Alternative form of not

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hnútr.

Noun

nut m (definite singular nuten, indefinite plural nuter, definite plural nutene)

  1. a tall, rounded mountain top

References

  • “nut” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse hnútr.

Noun

nut m (definite singular nuten, indefinite plural nutar, definite plural nutane)

  1. a tall, rounded mountain top

References

  • “nut” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Swedish

Alternative forms

  • not

Etymology

From Old Norse hnot, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts.

Noun

nut f

  1. nut

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: nöt

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nut/

Noun

nut f

  1. genitive plural of nuta

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nʌʔ/

Interjection

nut

  1. (South Scots) no; used to show disagreement or negation.

Unua

Noun

nut

  1. Alternative form of naut

Further reading

  • Elizabeth Pearce, A Grammar of Unua (2015)

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