Enable vs Able what difference

what is difference between Enable and Able

English

Etymology

From Middle English enablen, equivalent to en- +‎ able.

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈneɪbəl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl

Verb

enable (third-person singular simple present enables, present participle enabling, simple past and past participle enabled)

  1. To make somebody able (to do, or to be, something); to give sufficient ability or power to do or to be; to give strength or ability to.
    • 1611, King James Bible, “1 Tim. i. 12”
      And I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who hath enabled me, for that he counted me faithful, putting me into the ministry; who was before a blasphemer, and a persecutor, and injurious: but I obtained mercy, because I did it ignorantly in unbelief.
    Synonyms: empower, endow
  2. To affirm; to make firm and strong.
  3. To qualify or approve for some role or position; to render sanction or authorization to; to confirm suitability for.
    Synonyms: let, permit, authorize
  4. To yield the opportunity or provide the possibility for something; to provide with means, opportunities, and the like.
    Synonym: allow
    • 1711, October 13, Joseph Addison, The Spectator, number 195
      Temperance gives Nature her full play, and enables her to exert herself in all her force and vigor.
    • April 16, 2018, Norimitsu Onishi and Selam Gebrekidan writing in The New York Times, ‘They Eat Money’: How Mandela’s Political Heirs Grow Rich Off Corruption
    • 2009, Meribeth A. Dayme, Dynamics of the Singing Voice, Springer Science & Business Media, p. 174:
      Trainers of modern athletes monitor performance by using high tech equipment and biometric bodysuits with embedded sensors to enable detailed analysis of movement, balance, efficiency for athletic performance.
  5. To imply or tacitly confer excuse for an action or a behavior.
  6. (electronics) To put a circuit element into action by supplying a suitable input pulse.
  7. (chiefly electronics, computing) To activate, to make operational (especially of a function of an electronic or mechanical device).
    Synonyms: activate, turn on
    Antonym: disable

Derived terms

  • enabler
  • enablement
  • re-enable
  • reenable

Translations

Further reading

  • enable in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • enable in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • enable at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • baleen


English

Alternative forms

  • (obsolete) hable

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈeɪ.bl̩/, /ˈeɪ.bəl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪbəl
  • Homophone: Abel

Etymology 1

From Middle English able, from Old Northern French able, variant of Old French abile, habile, from Latin habilis (easily managed, held, or handled; apt; skillful), from habeō (have, possess) +‎ -ibilis.

Adjective

able (comparative abler, superlative ablest)

  1. (obsolete) Easy to use. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the mid 18th century.]
  2. (obsolete) Suitable; competent. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 18th century.]
  3. (obsolete, dialectal) Liable to. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
  4. Having the necessary powers or the needed resources to accomplish a task. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
  5. Free from constraints preventing completion of task; permitted to; not prevented from. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
  6. (obsolete, dialectal) Having the physical strength; robust; healthy. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
  7. (obsolete) Rich; well-to-do. [Attested from the mid 16th century until the late 19th century.]
  8. Gifted with skill, intelligence, knowledge, or competence. [First attested in the mid 16th century.]
  9. (law) Legally qualified or competent. [First attested in the early 18th century.]
  10. (nautical) Capable of performing all the requisite duties; as an able seaman. [First attested in the late 18th century.]
Usage notes
  • In standard English, one is “able to do something”. In some older texts representing various dialects, particularly Irish English, or black speech, “able for do something” is found instead, and in some Caribbean dialects “able with” is sometimes found.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:skillful
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English ablen, from Middle English able (adjective).

Verb

able (third-person singular simple present ables, present participle abling, simple past and past participle abled)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To make ready. [Attested from around (1150 to 1350) until the late 16th century.]
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To make capable; to enable. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 19th century.]
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To dress. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 15th century.]
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To give power to; to reinforce; to confirm. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the mid 17th century.]
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To vouch for; to guarantee. [Attested from the late 16th century until the early 17th century.]
Derived terms
  • abled
Translations

Etymology 3

From the first letter of the word. Suggested in the 1916 United States Army Signal Book to distinguish the letter when communicating via telephone, and later adopted in other radio and telephone signal standards.

Noun

able (uncountable)

  1. (military) The letter “A” in Navy Phonetic Alphabet.

References

Anagrams

  • Abel, Bale, Beal, Blea, Ebla, Elba, albe, bael, bale, beal, blea

French

Noun

able m (plural ables)

  1. a vernacular name of the common bleak (usually called ablette)
  2. a vernacular name of the sunbleak or moderlieschen, also called able de Heckel
  3. (rare) a vernacular name of any of some other related fishes in the genus Alburnus (Cyprinidae)

Further reading

  • “able” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • Abel, Bâle, béal, bêla

Old French

Alternative forms

  • abile
  • abille
  • habile

Etymology

Latin habilis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.blə/

Adjective

able m (oblique and nominative feminine singular able)

  1. able; capable

Declension

Descendants

  • French: habile
    • Romanian: abil
  • Middle Dutch: abel
    • Dutch: abel
  • Middle English: able, habil
    • English: able, habile
      • Welsh: abl

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ebl/
  • (South Scots) IPA(key): /jɪbl/

Adjective

able (comparative mair able, superlative maist able)

  1. able, substantial, physically fit, strong, shrewd, cute
  2. (obsolete) well-to-do, rich

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