enact vs ordain what difference

what is difference between enact and ordain

English

Etymology

From Middle English enacten, from en-, from Old French en- (to cause to be), from Latin in- (in) and Old French acte (perform, do), from Latin actum, past participle of ago (set in motion).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈnækt/
  • Rhymes: -ækt

Verb

enact (third-person singular simple present enacts, present participle enacting, simple past and past participle enacted)

  1. (transitive, law) to make (a bill) into law
  2. (transitive) to act the part of; to play
  3. (transitive) to do; to effect

Derived terms

Related terms

  • act

Translations

Noun

enact

  1. (obsolete) purpose; determination



English

Etymology

From Middle English ordeynen, from Old French ordiner, from Latin ordinare (to order), from ordo (order). Doublet of ordinate.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɔɹˈdeɪn/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɔːˈdeɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • Hyphenation: or‧dain

Verb

ordain (third-person singular simple present ordains, present participle ordaining, simple past and past participle ordained)

  1. To prearrange unalterably.
  2. To decree.
  3. (religion) To admit into the ministry, for example as a priest, bishop, minister or Buddhist monk, or to authorize as a rabbi.
  4. To predestine.

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • foresay

Derived terms

  • ordainment
  • preordain

Related terms

  • order

Translations

See also

  • ordination

Further reading

  • ordain in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • ordain in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • ordain at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Ardoin, Dorian, NORAID, Orinda, Rodina, donair, draino, inroad, radion, ranoid

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