enclose vs insert what difference

what is difference between enclose and insert

English

Alternative forms

  • inclose (was as common as or more common than enclose until the early 1800s, is now uncommon)

Etymology

From Middle English enclosen, inclosen, from Middle English enclos, from Old French enclose, feminine plural past participle of enclore, from Vulgar Latin *inclaudō, *inclaudere, from Latin inclūdō (doublet of include). Equivalent to en- +‎ close.

Pronunciation

  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ənˈkloʊz/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪnˈkləʊz/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈkloʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

enclose (third-person singular simple present encloses, present participle enclosing, simple past and past participle enclosed)

  1. (transitive) to surround with a wall, fence, etc.
  2. (transitive) to insert into a container, usually an envelope or package

Usage notes

  • Until about 1820, it was common to spell this word, and the derived terms encloser and enclosure, with in- (i.e. as inclose, incloser, inclosure). Since 1820, the forms with en- have predominated.

Synonyms

  • (to surround with a wall &c.): incastellate, encastellate (used for cisterns, fountains, &c.); see also fortify

Translations

See also

  • encircle
  • encloser
  • enclosable

References

Anagrams

  • coleens


English

Etymology

From Latin insertus, past participle of inserō.

Pronunciation

  • Verb
    • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ĭnsûtʹ, IPA(key): /ɪnˈsɜːt/
    • (General American) enPR: ĭnsûrtʹ, IPA(key): /ɪnˈsɝt/
    • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t
  • Noun
    • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ĭnʹsût, IPA(key): /ˈɪnsɜːt/
    • (General American) enPR: ĭnʹsûrt, IPA(key): /ˈɪnsɝt/
  • Hyphenation: in‧sert

Verb

insert (third-person singular simple present inserts, present participle inserting, simple past and past participle inserted)

  1. (transitive) To put in between or into.
    In order to withdraw money from a cash machine, you have to insert your debit card.
    To make your proof easier to understand, I recommend you insert a few more steps.

Synonyms

  • (put in between or into): enter, inset, introduce, put in, put inside

Antonyms

  • delete

Related terms

Translations

Noun

insert (plural inserts)

  1. An image inserted into text.
  2. A promotional or instructive leaflet inserted into a magazine, newspaper, tape or disk package, etc.
    This software can print compact disc inserts if you have the right size of paper.
  3. A mechanical component inserted into another.
    a threaded insert
  4. (linguistics) An expression, such as “please” or an interjection, that may occur at various points in an utterance.
  5. (genetics) A sequence of DNA inserted into another DNA molecule.
  6. (television) A pre-recorded segment included as part of a live broadcast.
  7. (film, television) A close-up shot used to draw attention to a particular element of a larger scene.
    • 2013, David Bordwell, Narration in the Fiction Film (page 316)
      [] close-ups of her legs on the escalator, an insert of the emergency stop button (ARRET D’URGENCE), intercut close-ups of her glance and the cinema sign, []
  8. (audio effects) A plugin that adds an effect to an audio track.

Translations

Related terms

  • insertion

Anagrams

  • Stiner, Strine, Tiners, estrin, inerts, inters, niters, nitres, sinter, terins, triens, trines

Cebuano

Alternative forms

  • (slang) inhert

Etymology

From English insert, from Latin insertus, past participle of inserō.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: in‧sert

Verb

insert

  1. to tuck in; to push (the fabric at the bottom of a shirt) under the pants

Adjective

insert

  1. having one’s clothes tucked in

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:insert.


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.sɛʁ/

Noun

insert m (plural inserts)

  1. (genetics) insert

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