Encompass vs Comprise what difference

what is difference between Encompass and Comprise

English

Etymology

From Middle English encompassen, equivalent to en- +‎ compass.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ɛnˈkʌm.pəs/, /ɪnˈkʌm.pəs/, /ənˈkɔm.pəs/

Verb

encompass (third-person singular simple present encompasses, present participle encompassing, simple past and past participle encompassed)

  1. (transitive) To form a circle around; to encircle.
  2. (transitive) To include within its scope; to circumscribe or go round so as to surround; to enclose; to contain.
    Synonym: embrace
  3. (transitive) To include completely; to describe fully or comprehensively.
    This book on English grammar encompasses all irregular verbs.
    Synonym: (now rare) comprehend
  4. (transitive) To go around, especially, to circumnavigate.
    Drake encompassed the globe.

Related terms

  • encompassment

Translations

References

  • encompass in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • encompass in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


English

Etymology

From Middle English comprisen, from Old French compris, past participle of comprendre, from Latin comprehendere, contr. comprendere, past participle comprehensus (to comprehend); see comprehend. Compare apprise, reprise, surprise.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kəmˈpɹaɪz/

Verb

comprise (third-person singular simple present comprises, present participle comprising, simple past and past participle comprised)

  1. (transitive) To be made up of; to consist of (especially a comprehensive list of parts). [from the earlier 15th c.]
  2. (sometimes proscribed, usually in the passive) To compose; to constitute. [from the late 18th c.]
    • 1657, Isaac Barrow, Data (Euclid) (translation), Prop. XXX
      “Seeing then the angles comprised of equal right lines are equal, we have found the angle FDE equal to the angle ABC.”
    • Three chairs of the steamer type, all maimed, comprised the furniture of this roof-garden, with (by way of local colour) on one of the copings a row of four red clay flower-pots filled with sun-baked dust from which gnarled and rusty stalks thrust themselves up like withered elfin limbs.
  3. To contain or embrace. [from the earlier 15th c.]
  4. (patent law) To include, contain, or be made up of, defining the minimum elements, whether essential or inessential to define an invention.
    Coordinate term: compose (close-ended)

Usage notes

Synonyms

  • (to compose): form, make up; see also Thesaurus:compose

Related terms

  • comprehensive

Translations

Further reading

  • comprised of on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • comprise in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • comprise in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • perosmic

French

Verb

comprise

  1. feminine singular of the past participle of comprendre

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