encounter vs play what difference

what is difference between encounter and play

English

Alternative forms

  • incounter (archaic)
  • encountre, incountre (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English encountren, from rom Anglo-Norman encountrer, Old French encontrer (to confront), from encontre (against, counter to), from Late Latin incontrā (in front of) itself from Latin in (in) + contrā (against).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪnˈkaʊntɚ/, /ɪŋˈkaʊntɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪnˈkaʊntə/, /ɪŋˈkaʊntə/
  • Hyphenation: en‧coun‧ter
  • Rhymes: -aʊntə(ɹ)

Verb

encounter (third-person singular simple present encounters, present participle encountering, simple past and past participle encountered)

  1. (transitive) To meet (someone) or find (something), especially unexpectedly.
  2. (transitive) To confront (someone or something) face to face.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To engage in conflict, as with an enemy.
    Three armies encountered at Waterloo.

Synonyms

(meet unexpectedly): cross paths

Translations

Noun

encounter (plural encounters)

  1. A meeting, especially one that is unplanned or unexpected.
    • That was Selwyn’s first encounter with the Ruthvens. A short time afterward at the opera Gerald dragged him into a parterre to say something amiable to one of the amiable débutante Craig girls—and Selwyn found himself again facing Alixe.
    • 1995, Maija Kalin, Coping with problems of understanding: repair sequences in coversations between native and non-native speakers:
      As they have planned the encounters, they mostly have control over the time limits.
  2. A hostile, often violent meeting; a confrontation, skirmish, or clash, as between combatants.
  3. (sports) A match between two opposing sides.

Synonyms

  • (hostile meeting): clash, confrontation, brush, skirmish

Derived terms

  • close encounter
  • encounter group

Translations

Anagrams

  • encountre


English

Etymology

From Middle English pleyen, playen, pleȝen, plæien, also Middle English plaȝen, plawen (compare English plaw), from Old English pleġan, pleoġan, plæġan, and Old English plegian, pleagian, plagian (to play, exercise, etc.), from Proto-West Germanic *plehan (to care about, be concerned with) and Proto-West Germanic *plegōn (to engage, move); both perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *blek- (to move, move about), from Proto-Indo-European *bal- (compare Ancient Greek βλύω (blúō), βλύζω (blúzō, I gush out, spring), Sanskrit बल्बलीति (balbalīti, it whirls, twirls)). Cognate with Scots play (to act or move briskly, cause to move, stir), Saterland Frisian pleegje (to look after, care for, maintain), West Frisian pleegje, pliigje (to commit, perform, bedrive), Middle Dutch pleyen (“to dance, leap for joy, rejoice, be glad”; compare Modern Dutch pleien (to play a particular children’s game)), Dutch plegen (to commit, bedrive, practice), German pflegen (to care for, be concerned with, attend to, tend). Related also to Old English plēon (to risk, endanger). More at plight, pledge.

The noun is from Middle English pleye, from Old English plæġ, plega, plæġa (play, quick [ motion, movement, exercise; (athletic) sport, game; festivity, drama; battle; gear for games, an implement for a game; clapping with the hands, applause), deverbative of plegian (to play); see above.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: plā, IPA(key): /pleɪ/, [pl̥eɪ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Verb

play (third-person singular simple present plays, present participle playing, simple past and past participle played)

  1. (intransitive) To act in a manner such that one has fun; to engage in activities expressly for the purpose of recreation or entertainment.
    • 2003, Anne-Nelly Perret-Clermont et al. (eds.), Joining Society: Social Interaction and Learning in Adolescence and Youth, Cambridge Univ. Press, p.52:
      We had to play for an hour, so that meant that we didn’t have time to play and joke around.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To perform in (a sport); to participate in (a game).
    Hypernym: try
    Hyponym: replay
    1. (transitive) To compete against, in a game.
      We’re playing one of the top teams in the next round.
    2. (transitive) (in the scoring of games and sports) To be the opposing score to.
      Look at the score now … 23 plays 8!
  3. (intransitive) To take part in amorous activity; to make love.
    Synonyms: get it on, make out, have sex; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  4. To gamble.
    • 1791, Charlotte Smith, Celestina, Broadview 2004, p. 407:
      “I play, comparatively, very little; I don’t drink a fifth part so much as half the people I live with; and I reckon myself, upon the whole, a very orderly, sober fellow.”
  5. (transitive) To act as the indicated role, especially in a performance.
    • 1984, Chris Robinson, commercial for Vicks Formula 44:
  6. (heading, transitive, intransitive) To produce music or theatre.
    1. (intransitive, of a music) To produce music.
      Synonyms: cook, jam; see also Thesaurus:play music
      • 2007, Dan Erlewine, Guitar Player Repair Guide →ISBN, page 220:
        If your guitar plays well on fretted strings but annoys you on the open ones, the nut’s probably worn out.
    2. (intransitive, especially of a person) To produce music using a musical instrument.
    3. (transitive, especially of a person) To produce music (or a specified song or musical style) using (a specified musical instrument).
    4. (transitive, ergative) To use a device to watch or listen to the indicated recording.
    5. (intransitive, of a theatrical performance) To be performed; (or of a film) to be shown.
    6. (transitive, of a theatrical company or band, etc.) To perform in or at; to give performances in or at.
      • 2008, My Life: From Normandy to Hockeytown →ISBN, p.30:
        I got a hold of Louis (Satchmo) Armstrong’s agent and I explained to him on the phone that, “I know you’re playing London on Wednesday night. Why don’t you come and play the Arena in Windsor on Saturday night?”
    7. (transitive) To act or perform (a play).
  7. (heading) To behave in a particular way.
    1. (copulative) Contrary to fact, to give an appearance of being.
      • 1985, Sharon S. Brehm, Intimate Relationships:
        Playing hard to get is not the same as slamming the door in someone’s face.
      • 1996, Michael P. Malone, James J Hill: Empire Builder of the Northwest:
        Now, surveying his final link, he had the nice advantage of being able to play coy with established port cities that desperately wanted his proven railroad.
      • 2003, John U. Ogbu, Black American Students in an Affluent Suburb: A Study of Academic Disengagement, p.194:
        Instead, they played dumb, remained silent, and did their classwork.
    2. (intransitive) To act with levity or thoughtlessness; to trifle; to be careless.
    3. (intransitive) To act; to behave; to practice deception.
    4. (transitive) To bring into sportive or wanton action; to exhibit in action; to execute.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To move in any manner; especially, to move regularly with alternate or reciprocating motion; to operate.
    • 1705, George Cheyne, Philosophical Principles of Religion:
      The heart beats, the blood circulates, the lungs play.
    • The colonel and his sponsor made a queer contrast: Greystone [the sponsor] long and stringy, with a face that seemed as if a cold wind was eternally playing on it.
  9. (intransitive) To move to and fro.
    • The setting sun / Plays on their shining arms and burnished helmets.
  10. (transitive) To put in action or motion.
  11. (transitive) To keep in play, as a hooked fish in order to land it.
  12. (transitive, colloquial) To manipulate, deceive, or swindle someone.
    Synonym: defraud

Conjugation

Translations

Noun

play (countable and uncountable, plural plays)

  1. (uncountable, formerly countable) Activity for amusement only, especially among the young.
    • 1803, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey
      She was fond of all boys’ plays, and greatly preferred cricket [] to dolls []
  2. (uncountable) Similar activity in young animals, as they explore their environment and learn new skills.
  3. (uncountable) The conduct, or course, of a game.
  4. (uncountable) An individual’s performance in a sport or game.
  5. (countable) A short sequence of action within a game.
  6. (countable, turn-based games) An action carried out when it is one’s turn to play.
    Synonym: move
    • 2009, Joe Edley, John Williams, Everything Scrabble: Third Edition (page 85)
      AWARD is better than either WARED or WADER. However, there’s an even better play! If you have looked at the two-to-make-three letter list, you may have noticed the word AWA.
  7. (countable) A literary composition, intended to be represented by actors impersonating the characters and speaking the dialogue.
    Synonyms: drama; see also Thesaurus:drama
  8. (countable) A theatrical performance featuring actors.
  9. (countable) An attempt to move forward, as in a plan or strategy, for example by a business, investor, or political party.
  10. (countable) A geological formation that contains an accumulation or prospect of hydrocarbons or other resources.
  11. (uncountable) The extent to which a part of a mechanism can move freely.
  12. (uncountable, informal) Sexual activity or sexual role-playing.
    • 1996, “toptigger”, (on Internet newsgroup alt.personals.spanking.punishment)
      Palm Springs M seeks sane F 4 safe bdsm play
  13. (countable) An instance of watching or listening to digital media.
    Synonyms: (of visual media) view, (of audio) listen
  14. (countable) A button that, when pressed, causes media to be played.
  15. (archaic, now usually in compounds) Activity relating to martial combat or fighting.
    handplay, swordplay

Translations

Derived terms

See also

  • outdoor

Further reading

  • play on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • play at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • play in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • paly, pyla

Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from English play, possibly via Japanese プレイ (purei).

Pronunciation

Suffix

play

  1. play (sexual roleplaying)
    羞恥play / 羞耻play  ―  xiūchǐ play  ―  erotic humiliation
    女裝play / 女装play  ―  nǚzhuāng play  ―  crossdressing
    各種奇怪的play / 各种奇怪的play  ―  gèzhǒng qíguài de play  ―  all kinds of strange sexual roleplaying

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English play.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈplɛj/, /ˈplej/

Noun

play m (invariable)

  1. play (theatrical performance; start key)

Interjection

play

  1. used to announce the start a game of tennis

References


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English play.

Noun

play m (plural playes)

  1. play (button)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial