encroach vs trench what difference

what is difference between encroach and trench

English

Etymology

From Middle English encrochen, from Old French encrochier (to seize), from Old French en- + croc (hook), of Germanic origin. More at crook.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪŋˈkɹəʊtʃ/, /ɛŋˈkɹəʊtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊtʃ

Verb

encroach (third-person singular simple present encroaches, present participle encroaching, simple past and past participle encroached)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) to seize, appropriate
  2. (intransitive) to intrude unrightfully on someone else’s rights or territory
    • 1579, Immeritô [pseudonym; Edmund Spenser], The Shepheardes Calender: Conteyning Tvvelue Æglogues Proportionable to the Twelue Monethes. Entitled to the Noble and Vertuous Gentleman most Worthy of all Titles both of Learning and Cheualrie M. Philip Sidney, London: Printed by Hugh Singleton, dwelling in Creede Lane neere vnto Ludgate at the signe of the gylden Tunne, and are there to be solde, OCLC 606515406; republished in Francis J[ames] Child, editor, The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser: The Text Carefully Revised, and Illustrated with Notes, Original and Selected by Francis J. Child: Five Volumes in Three, volume III, Boston: Houghton, Mifflin and Company; The Riverside Press, Cambridge, published 1855, OCLC 793557671, page 406, lines 222–228:
      Now stands the Brere like a lord alone, / Puffed up with pryde and vaine pleasaunce. / But all this glee had no continuaunce: / For eftsones winter gan to approche; / The blustering Boreas did encroche, / And beate upon the solitarie Brere; / For nowe no succoure was seene him nere.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 252d.
      Because change itself would absolutely stay-stable, and again, conversely, stability itself would change, if each of them encroached on the other.
  3. (intransitive) to advance gradually beyond due limits

Derived terms

  • encroacher
  • encroachment

Translations

Noun

encroach (plural encroaches)

  1. (rare) Encroachment.
    • 1805, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, ‘What is Life?’:
      All that we see, all colours of all shade, / By encroach of darkness made?
    • 2002, Caroline Winterer, The Culture of Classicism, JHU Press 2002, p. 116:
      Shorey was among the most vociferous opponents of the encroach of scientism and utilitarianism in education and society in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Cochrane, charneco


English

Etymology

Borrowed into Middle English from Old French trenche.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɹɛntʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛntʃ

Noun

trench (plural trenches)

  1. A long, narrow ditch or hole dug in the ground.
  2. (military) A narrow excavation as used in warfare, as a cover for besieging or emplaced forces.
  3. (archaeology) A pit, usually rectangular with smooth walls and floor, excavated during an archaeological investigation.
  4. (informal) A trench coat.
    • 1999, April 24, Xiphias Gladius <ian@schultz.io.com>, “Re: trenchcoat mafia”, ne.general.selected, Usenet:
      I was the first person in my high school to wear a trench and fedora constantly, and Ben was one of the first to wear a black trench.
    • 2007, Nina Garcia, The Little Black Book of Style, HarperCollins, as excerpted in Elle, October, page 138:
      A classic trench can work in any kind of weather and goes well with almost anything.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • tranche

Translations

Verb

trench (third-person singular simple present trenches, present participle trenching, simple past and past participle trenched)

  1. (usually followed by upon) To invade, especially with regard to the rights or the exclusive authority of another; to encroach.
    • 1640, Ben Jonson, Underwoods, page 68:
      Shee is the Judge, Thou Executioner, Or if thou needs would’st trench upon her power, Thou mightst have yet enjoy’d thy crueltie, With some more thrift, and more varietie.
    • 1832, Isaac Taylor, Saturday Evening
      Does it not seem as if for a creature to challenge to itself a boundless attribute, were to trench upon the prerogative of the divine nature?
    • 1949, Charles Austin Beard, American Government and Politics, page 16:
      He could make what laws he pleased, as long as those laws did not trench upon property rights.
    • 2005, Carl von Clausewitz, J. J. Graham, On War, page 261:
      [O]ur ideas, therefore, must trench upon the province of tactics.
  2. (military, infantry) To excavate an elongated pit for protection of soldiers and or equipment, usually perpendicular to the line of sight toward the enemy.
    • Advanc’d upon the field there stood a mound
      Of earth congested, wall’d , and trench’d around
  3. (archaeology) To excavate an elongated and often narrow pit.
  4. To have direction; to aim or tend.
    • 1612, Francis Bacon, Of Judicature
      the reason and consequence thereof may trench to point of estate
  5. To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, etc.
  6. To cut furrows or ditches in.
  7. To dig or cultivate very deeply, usually by digging parallel contiguous trenches in succession, filling each from the next.

French

Etymology

From English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁɛntʃ/

Noun

trench m (plural trenchs)

  1. trench coat

Italian

Etymology

From English trench coat.

Noun

trench m (invariable)

  1. trench coat

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