encumbrance vs load what difference

what is difference between encumbrance and load

English

Alternative forms

  • incumbrance

Etymology

From Middle English encombraunce, from Old French encombrance, from encombrer.

Noun

encumbrance (countable and uncountable, plural encumbrances)

  1. Something that encumbers; a burden that must be carried.
    • Some consideration was necessary to decide whether or not to leave his rifle there. On the return, carrying the girl and a pack, it would be added encumbrance []
  2. (law) An interest, right, burden, or liability attached to a title of land, such as a lien or mortgage.
  3. (law) One who is dependent on another.
    a widow without encumbrances, i.e. without children

Synonyms

  • encumberment

Translations

Verb

encumbrance (third-person singular simple present encumbrances, present participle encumbrancing, simple past and past participle encumbranced)

  1. (law) To apply an encumbrance to (property, etc.).


English

Etymology

The sense of “burden” first arose in the 13th century as a secondary meaning of Middle English lode, loade, which had the main significance of “way, course, journey”, from Old English lād (course, journey; way, street, waterway; leading, carrying; maintenance, support) (ultimately from Proto-Germanic *laidō (leading, way), Proto-Indo-European *leyt- (to go, go forth, die), cognate with Middle Low German leide (entourage, escort), German Leite (line, course, load), Swedish led (way, trail, line), Icelandic leið (way, course, route)).
As such, load is a doublet of lode, which has preserved the older meaning.

Most likely, the semantic extension of the Middle English substantive arose by conflation with the (etymologically unrelated) verb lade; however, Middle English lode occurs only as a substantive; the transitive verb load (to charge with a load) is recorded only in the 16th century (frequently in Shakespeare),
and (except for the participle laden) has largely supplanted lade in modern English.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /loʊd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ləʊd/
    • Homophones: lode, lowed
  • Rhymes: -əʊd

Noun

load (plural loads)

  1. A burden; a weight to be carried.
  2. (figuratively) A worry or concern to be endured, especially in the phrase a load off one’s mind.
    • Our life’s a load.
    • 2005, Coldplay, Green Eyes
      I came here with a load and it feels so much lighter, now I’ve met you.
  3. A certain number of articles or quantity of material that can be transported or processed at one time.
  4. A quantity of washing put into a washing machine for a wash cycle.
  5. (in combination) Used to form nouns that indicate a large quantity, often corresponding to the capacity of a vehicle
  6. (often in the plural, colloquial) A large number or amount.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:lot
  7. The volume of work required to be performed.
  8. (engineering) The force exerted on a structural component such as a beam, girder, cable etc.
  9. (electrical engineering) The electrical current or power delivered by a device.
  10. (engineering) A resistive force encountered by a prime mover when performing work.
  11. (electrical engineering) Any component that draws current or power from an electrical circuit.
  12. A unit of measure for various quantities.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, p. 172:
      If this load equals its modern representative, it contains 18 cwt. of dry, 19 of new hay.
  13. The viral load
  14. A very small explosive inserted as a gag into a cigarette or cigar.
  15. The charge of powder for a firearm.
  16. (obsolete) Weight or violence of blows.
  17. (vulgar, slang) The contents (e.g. semen) of an ejaculation.
    • 2006, John Patrick, Barely Legal, page 102
      Already, Robbie had dumped a load into his dad, and now, before my very eyes, was Alan’s own cock lube seeping out
    • 2009, John Butler Wanderlust, page 35
      It felt so good, I wanted to just keep going until I blew a load down his throat, but I hadn’t even seen his ass yet, and I sure didn’t want to come yet.
  18. (euphemistic) Nonsense; rubbish.
  19. (computing) The process of loading something, i.e. transferring it into memory or over a network, etc.
    • 2009, Daniel Page, A Practical Introduction to Computer Architecture (page 614)
      This description represents a form of delay slot: the load operation takes some time to complete, say n cycles. Thus, the value loaded only becomes valid n cycles after the load seems to have executed and can therefore only be read after then.

Synonyms

  • (unspecific heavy weight to be carried): charge, freight
  • (unit of lead): fodder, fother, cartload, carrus, charrus
  • (the contents of one’s ejaculation): cumwad, wad

Hyponyms

  • (112 cartload of wool & for smaller divisions): wey
  • (130 cartload of lead & for smaller divisions): fotmal
  • (136 cartload of straw or hay & for smaller divisions): truss

Derived terms

  • see Category:English words derived from: load (noun)

Translations

Verb

load (third-person singular simple present loads, present participle loading, simple past loaded, past participle loaded or (archaic) loaden)

  1. (transitive) To put a load on or in (a means of conveyance or a place of storage).
  2. (transitive) To place in or on a conveyance or a place of storage.
  3. (intransitive) To put a load on something.
  4. (intransitive) To receive a load.
  5. (intransitive) To be placed into storage or conveyance.
  6. (transitive) To fill (a firearm or artillery) with munition.
  7. (transitive) To insert (an item or items) into an apparatus so as to ready it for operation, such as a reel of film into a camera, sheets of paper into a printer etc.
  8. (transitive) To fill (an apparatus) with raw material.
  9. (intransitive) To be put into use in an apparatus.}}
  10. (transitive, computing) To read (data or a program) from a storage medium into computer memory.
  11. (intransitive, computing) To transfer from a storage medium into computer memory.
  12. (transitive, baseball) To put runners on first, second and third bases
  13. (transitive) To tamper with so as to produce a biased outcome.
  14. (transitive) To ask or adapt a question so that it will be more likely to be answered in a certain way.
  15. (transitive) To encumber with something negative, to place as an encumbrance.
  16. (transitive) To provide in abundance.
  17. (transitive) To weight (a cane, whip, etc.) with lead or similar.
  18. (transitive, archaic, slang) To adulterate or drug.
  19. (transitive, archaic) To magnetize.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • See Category:English words derived from: load (verb)
  • carbo-load
  • load up
  • reload

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • -adol, -adol-, Aldo, alod, odal

Cebuano

Etymology

Borrowed from English load.

Noun

load

  1. prepaid phone credit

Verb

load

  1. to top up or purchase phone credits

Estonian

Noun

load

  1. nominative plural of luba

Spanish

Verb

load

  1. (Spain) Informal second-person plural (vosotros or vosotras) affirmative imperative form of loar.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial