end vs last what difference

what is difference between end and last

English

Alternative forms

  • ende (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English ende, from Old English ende, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz (compare Dutch einde, German Ende, Norwegian ende, Swedish ände), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos (compare Old Irish ét (end, point), Latin antiae (forelock), Albanian anë (side), Ancient Greek ἀντίος (antíos, opposite), Sanskrit अन्त्य (antya, last)), from *h₂entíos (front, forehead). More at and and anti-.

The verb is from Middle English enden, endien, from Old English endian (to end, to make an end of, complete, finish, abolish, destroy, come to an end, die), from Proto-Germanic *andijōną (to finish, end), denominative from *andijaz.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /ɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Noun

end (plural ends)

  1. The terminal point of something in space or time.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      they followed him… into a sort of a central hall; out of which they could dimly see other long tunnel-like passages branching, passages mysterious and without apparent end.
  2. (by extension) The cessation of an effort, activity, state, or motion.
    Is there no end to this madness?
  3. (by extension) Death.
    He met a terrible end in the jungle.
    I hope the end comes quickly.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act II, scene i:
      Confound your hidden falsehood, and award / Either of you to be the other’s end.
    • 1732, Alexander Pope, (epitaph) On Mr. Gay, in Westminster Abbey:
      A safe companion and and easy friend / Unblamed through life, lamented in thy end.
  4. The most extreme point of an object, especially one that is longer than it is wide.
    Hold the string at both ends.
    My father always sat at the end of the table.
  5. Result.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Act V, scene i:
      O that a man might know / The end of this day’s business ere it come!
  6. A purpose, goal, or aim.
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe, Act III, scene i:
      But, losing her, the End of Living lose.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection in the Formation of a Manly Character, Aphorism VI, page 146:
      When every man is his own end, all things will come to a bad end.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.21:
      There is a long argument to prove that foreign conquest is not the end of the State, showing that many people took the imperialist view.
  7. (cricket) One of the two parts of the ground used as a descriptive name for half of the ground.
  8. (American football) The position at the end of either the offensive or defensive line, a tight end, a split end, a defensive end.
    • 1926, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Penguin 2000, page 11:
      Her husband, among various physical accomplishments, had been one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven […].
  9. (curling) A period of play in which each team throws eight rocks, two per player, in alternating fashion.
  10. (mathematics) An ideal point of a graph or other complex.
  11. That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap.
    odds and ends
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act I, scene iii:
      I clothe my naked villainy / With old odd ends stolen out of holy writ, / And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
  12. One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
  13. (in the plural, slang, African-American Vernacular) Money.
    Don’t give them your ends. You jack that shit!

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “end”: final, ultimate, deep, happy, etc.

Synonyms

  • (final point in space or time): conclusion, limit, terminus, termination
  • See also Thesaurus:goal

Antonyms

  • (final point of something): beginning, start

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: エンド

Translations

Verb

end (third-person singular simple present ends, present participle ending, simple past and past participle ended)

  1. (intransitive, ergative) to come to an end
  2. (transitive) To finish, terminate.
    • And on the seventh day God ended his worke []
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, scene iii:
      If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XLV, lines 7-8:
      But play the man, stand up and end you, / When your sickness is your soul.
Conjugation

Translations

Derived terms

  • ending
  • end up
  • never-ending
  • unending

Anagrams

  • DEN, DNE, Den, Den., NDE, NED, Ned, den, edn., ned

Albanian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Albanian *antis/t, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂n̥t-jes/t (to plait, weave).

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (transitive) to weave
    Synonyms: vej, vegjoj
Derived terms
  • endem

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂endʰ-.

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (intransitive) to bloom, blossom
  2. (transitive) to flyblow
Derived terms
  • endëc
Related terms
  • endë

References


Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse enn, probably from Proto-Germanic *þan (then), like English than, German denn (than, for). For the loss of þ-, cf. Old Norse at (that) from Proto-Germanic *þat (that)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Conjunction

end

  1. than (in comparisons)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse enn, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Adverb

end

  1. still (archaic)
  2. (with interrogatives) no matter, ever
  3. even (in the modern language only in the combination end ikke “not even”)

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnˀ/

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ende (end) with apocope of the final -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

end n (plural enden, diminutive endje n)

  1. end
  2. travel distance
  3. a short length of something (such as a stick or a rope)

Synonyms

  • einde
  • eind

Usage notes

The form end is more informal than both einde and eind and is mainly used colloquially.

Anagrams

  • den

Estonian

Pronoun

end

  1. partitive singular of ise

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English ende.

Noun

end

  1. Alternative form of ende

Etymology 2

From Old English endian.

Verb

end

  1. Alternative form of enden

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnd/, /ɛn/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd, -ɛn
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Homophone: enn

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Anagrams

  • den, ned

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

end

  1. imperative of enda and ende

Vilamovian

Etymology

From Middle High German ende, from Old High German enti.

Pronunciation

Noun

end n

  1. end

Antonyms

  • ofaong


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: läst, IPA(key): /lɑːst/
  • (General American) enPR: lăst, IPA(key): /læst/
  • (Northern England) IPA(key): /last/
  • (Scotland) IPA(key): /ɫast/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːst, -æst

Etymology 1

From Middle English laste, latst, syncopated variant of latest.

Adjective

last (not comparable)

  1. Final, ultimate, coming after all others of its kind.
  2. Most recent, latest, last so far.
    .   (archaic usage)
  3. Farthest of all from a given quality, character, or condition; most unlikely, or least preferable.
  4. Being the only one remaining of its class.
  5. Supreme; highest in degree; utmost.
    • 1802, Robert Hall, Reflections on War
      Contending for principles of the last importance.
  6. Lowest in rank or degree.
Synonyms
  • (final): at the end, caboose, dernier (dated), final, tail end, terminal, ultimate, lattermost
  • (most recent): latest, most recent
Derived terms
Translations

Determiner

last

  1. The (one) immediately before the present.
  2. (of days of the week or months of the year) Closest in the past, or closest but one if the closest was very recent; of days, sometimes thought to specifically refer to the instance closest to seven days (one week) ago.
Usage notes
  • (both senses): This cannot be used in past or future tense to refer to a time immediately before the subject matter. For example, one does not say I was very tired yesterday, due to not having slept well last night: last night in that sentence refers to the night before the speaker is speaking, not the night before the “yesterday” to which he refers. He would need to say I was very tired yesterday, due to not having slept well the night before or the like.
Translations

Adverb

last (not comparable)

  1. Most recently.
  2. (sequence) after everything else; finally
Synonyms
  • (after everything else): finally, lastly; see also Thesaurus:lastly
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English lasten, from Old English lǣstan, from Proto-Germanic *laistijaną. Cognate with German leisten (yield).

Verb

last (third-person singular simple present lasts, present participle lasting, simple past and past participle lasted)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To perform, carry out.
  2. (intransitive) To endure, continue over time.
    • Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; [].
  3. (intransitive) To hold out, continue undefeated or entire.
Synonyms
  • continue
  • endure
  • survive
Antonyms
  • disintegrate
  • dissipate
  • fall apart
  • wear out
Related terms
  • everlasting
  • lasting
Translations

Etymology 3

From Old English læste, Proto-Germanic *laistiz. Compare Swedish läst, German Leisten.

Noun

last (plural lasts)

  1. A tool for shaping or preserving the shape of shoes.
    • 2006, Newman, Cathy, Every Shoe Tells a Story, National Geographic (September, 2006), 83,
      How is an in-your-face black leather thigh-high lace-up boot with a four-inch spike heel like a man’s black calf lace-up oxford? They are both made on a last, the wood or plastic foot-shaped form that leather is stretched over and shaped to make a shoe.
Derived terms
  • cobbler, keep to your last
Translations

Verb

last (third-person singular simple present lasts, present participle lasting, simple past and past participle lasted)

  1. To shape with a last; to fasten or fit to a last; to place smoothly on a last.

Etymology 4

From Middle English last, from Old English hlæst (burden, load, freight), from Proto-Germanic *hlastuz (burden, load, freight), from Proto-Indo-European *kleh₂- (to put, lay out). Cognate with West Frisian lêst, Dutch last, German Last, Swedish last, Icelandic lest.

Noun

last (plural lasts or lasten)

  1. (obsolete) A burden; load; a cargo; freight.
  2. (obsolete) A measure of weight or quantity, varying in designation depending on the goods concerned.
    • 1624, John Smith, Generall Historie, in Kupperman 1988, page 114:
      Now we so quietly followed our businesse, that in three moneths wee made three or foure Last of Tarre, Pitch, and Sope ashes […].
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, page 169,
      The last of wool is twelve sacks.
  3. (obsolete) An old English (and Dutch) measure of the carrying capacity of a ship, equal to two tons.
    • 1942 (1601), T D Mutch, The First Discovery of Australia, page 14,
      The tonnage of the Duyfken of Harmensz’s fleet is given as 25 and 30 lasten.
  4. A load of some commodity with reference to its weight and commercial value.
Derived terms
  • belast
  • ballast
Translations

Further reading

  • last at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • last (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • last on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Alts, LTAs, SALT, Salt, TLAs, alts, lats, salt, slat

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /last/, [lasd̥]

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German last.

Noun

last c (singular definite lasten, plural indefinite laster)

  1. cargo
  2. cargo hold, hold (cargo area)
  3. weight, burden
Inflection
Synonyms
  • (cargo): ladning
  • (hold): lastrum

Etymology 2

From Old Norse lǫstr

Noun

last c (singular definite lasten, plural indefinite laster)

  1. vice
Inflection

Etymology 3

See laste (to load, carry) and laste (to blame).

Verb

last

  1. imperative of laste

Further reading

  • last on the Danish Wikipedia.Wikipedia da

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑst/
  • Rhymes: -ɑst

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch last, from Old Dutch *last, from Proto-Germanic *hlastuz.

Noun

last m (plural lasten, diminutive lastje n)

  1. load, weight
  2. burden
  3. hindrance, problem
  4. expense
  5. (law) requirement, duty
  6. (dated) A measure of volume, 3 cubic meter
Derived terms
  • belasten
  • lastdrager
  • last hebben van
  • lastpost
  • ten laste leggen
  • vaste last
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: last

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

last

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of lassen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of lassen

Anagrams

  • stal

Estonian

Noun

last (genitive lasti, partitive lasti)

  1. cargo

Declension

Noun

last

  1. partitive singular of laps

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /last/

Etymology 1

From Old Norse lǫstr

Noun

last f (genitive singular lastar, plural lastir)

  1. vice
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Middle Low German last.

Noun

last f (genitive singular lastar, plural lastir)

  1. cargo
  2. cargo hold, hold (cargo area)
Inflection

German

Pronunciation

Verb

last

  1. second-person singular/plural preterite of lesen

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /last/
  • Rhymes: -ast

Noun

last n (genitive singular lasts, no plural)

  1. blame

Declension

Synonyms

  • (blame): baktal

Derived terms

  • guðlast (blasphemy)

Related terms

  • lasta (to blame)

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *last, from Proto-Germanic *hlastuz.

Noun

last m or f or n

  1. load, weight
  2. task, duty, obligation
  3. tax (money)
  4. (emotional) difficulty, sorrow
  5. a unit of volume

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: last
  • Limburgish: las

Further reading

  • “last”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “last”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Middle Low German last

Noun

last f or m (definite singular lasta or lasten, indefinite plural laster, definite plural lastene)

  1. a load or cargo
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

last

  1. imperative of laste

References

  • “last” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Middle Low German last

Noun

last f or m (definite singular lasta or lasten, indefinite plural laster or lastar, definite plural lastene or lastane)

  1. a load or cargo

Derived terms

References

  • “last” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *laist, along with the feminine variant lǣst.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑːst/

Noun

lāst m (nominative plural lāstas)

  1. footstep, track

Declension

Derived terms

  • wræclāst

Related terms

  • lǣstan

Slovene

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *volstь.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /láːst/

Noun

lȃst f

  1. property

Inflection


Swedish

Etymology

From Middle Low German last, from the verb lāden (to load), from Old Saxon hladan.

Pronunciation

Noun

last c

  1. cargo
  2. load; a burden
  3. load; a certain amount that can be processed at one time
  4. (engineering) load; a force on a structure
  5. (electrical engineering) load; any component that draws current or power

Declension

Derived terms

See also

  • (cargo): lasta, lastbil
  • (habit): vana, ovana

Descendants

  • Finnish: lasti

Etymology 2

From Old Swedish laster (Old Icelandic lǫstr), from Old Norse löstr, from the root of Proto-Germanic *lahaną (to reproach, blame), see also Old High German lastar (vice).

Noun

last c

  1. habit which is difficult to get rid of, vice
    Rökning var hans enda last

Declension

Anagrams

  • lats, salt, stal, tals

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