end vs lift what difference

what is difference between end and lift

English

Alternative forms

  • ende (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English ende, from Old English ende, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz (compare Dutch einde, German Ende, Norwegian ende, Swedish ände), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos (compare Old Irish ét (end, point), Latin antiae (forelock), Albanian anë (side), Ancient Greek ἀντίος (antíos, opposite), Sanskrit अन्त्य (antya, last)), from *h₂entíos (front, forehead). More at and and anti-.

The verb is from Middle English enden, endien, from Old English endian (to end, to make an end of, complete, finish, abolish, destroy, come to an end, die), from Proto-Germanic *andijōną (to finish, end), denominative from *andijaz.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /ɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Noun

end (plural ends)

  1. The terminal point of something in space or time.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      they followed him… into a sort of a central hall; out of which they could dimly see other long tunnel-like passages branching, passages mysterious and without apparent end.
  2. (by extension) The cessation of an effort, activity, state, or motion.
    Is there no end to this madness?
  3. (by extension) Death.
    He met a terrible end in the jungle.
    I hope the end comes quickly.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act II, scene i:
      Confound your hidden falsehood, and award / Either of you to be the other’s end.
    • 1732, Alexander Pope, (epitaph) On Mr. Gay, in Westminster Abbey:
      A safe companion and and easy friend / Unblamed through life, lamented in thy end.
  4. The most extreme point of an object, especially one that is longer than it is wide.
    Hold the string at both ends.
    My father always sat at the end of the table.
  5. Result.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Act V, scene i:
      O that a man might know / The end of this day’s business ere it come!
  6. A purpose, goal, or aim.
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe, Act III, scene i:
      But, losing her, the End of Living lose.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection in the Formation of a Manly Character, Aphorism VI, page 146:
      When every man is his own end, all things will come to a bad end.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.21:
      There is a long argument to prove that foreign conquest is not the end of the State, showing that many people took the imperialist view.
  7. (cricket) One of the two parts of the ground used as a descriptive name for half of the ground.
  8. (American football) The position at the end of either the offensive or defensive line, a tight end, a split end, a defensive end.
    • 1926, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Penguin 2000, page 11:
      Her husband, among various physical accomplishments, had been one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven […].
  9. (curling) A period of play in which each team throws eight rocks, two per player, in alternating fashion.
  10. (mathematics) An ideal point of a graph or other complex.
  11. That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap.
    odds and ends
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act I, scene iii:
      I clothe my naked villainy / With old odd ends stolen out of holy writ, / And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
  12. One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
  13. (in the plural, slang, African-American Vernacular) Money.
    Don’t give them your ends. You jack that shit!

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “end”: final, ultimate, deep, happy, etc.

Synonyms

  • (final point in space or time): conclusion, limit, terminus, termination
  • See also Thesaurus:goal

Antonyms

  • (final point of something): beginning, start

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: エンド

Translations

Verb

end (third-person singular simple present ends, present participle ending, simple past and past participle ended)

  1. (intransitive, ergative) to come to an end
  2. (transitive) To finish, terminate.
    • And on the seventh day God ended his worke []
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, scene iii:
      If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XLV, lines 7-8:
      But play the man, stand up and end you, / When your sickness is your soul.
Conjugation

Translations

Derived terms

  • ending
  • end up
  • never-ending
  • unending

Anagrams

  • DEN, DNE, Den, Den., NDE, NED, Ned, den, edn., ned

Albanian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Albanian *antis/t, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂n̥t-jes/t (to plait, weave).

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (transitive) to weave
    Synonyms: vej, vegjoj
Derived terms
  • endem

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂endʰ-.

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (intransitive) to bloom, blossom
  2. (transitive) to flyblow
Derived terms
  • endëc
Related terms
  • endë

References


Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse enn, probably from Proto-Germanic *þan (then), like English than, German denn (than, for). For the loss of þ-, cf. Old Norse at (that) from Proto-Germanic *þat (that)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Conjunction

end

  1. than (in comparisons)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse enn, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Adverb

end

  1. still (archaic)
  2. (with interrogatives) no matter, ever
  3. even (in the modern language only in the combination end ikke “not even”)

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnˀ/

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ende (end) with apocope of the final -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

end n (plural enden, diminutive endje n)

  1. end
  2. travel distance
  3. a short length of something (such as a stick or a rope)

Synonyms

  • einde
  • eind

Usage notes

The form end is more informal than both einde and eind and is mainly used colloquially.

Anagrams

  • den

Estonian

Pronoun

end

  1. partitive singular of ise

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English ende.

Noun

end

  1. Alternative form of ende

Etymology 2

From Old English endian.

Verb

end

  1. Alternative form of enden

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnd/, /ɛn/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd, -ɛn
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Homophone: enn

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Anagrams

  • den, ned

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

end

  1. imperative of enda and ende

Vilamovian

Etymology

From Middle High German ende, from Old High German enti.

Pronunciation

Noun

end n

  1. end

Antonyms

  • ofaong


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: lĭft, IPA(key): /lɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Etymology 1

From Middle English liften, lyften, from Old Norse lypta (to lift, air, literally to raise in the air), from Proto-Germanic *luftijaną (to raise in the air), related to *luftuz (roof, air), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *lewp- (to peel, break off, damage) or from a root meaning roof (see *luftuz). Cognate with Danish and Norwegian Bokmål løfte (to lift), Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish lyfta (to lift), German lüften (to air, lift), Old English lyft (air). See above. 1851 for the noun sense “a mechanical device for vertical transport”.

(To steal): For this sense Cleasby suggests perhaps a relation to the root of Gothic ???????????????????????????? (hliftus) “thief”, cognate with Latin cleptus and Greek κλέπτω (kléptō))

Verb

lift (third-person singular simple present lifts, present participle lifting, simple past lifted or (rare, regional, obsolete) lift, past participle lifted or (rare, regional, obsolete) lift or (obsolete) yleft)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To raise or rise.
    • c1490, Of Penance and Confession be master Jhon Yrlandː
      Liftand (lifting) thy hands and thy eyen to Heaven.
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Chapter I,
      Their walk had continued not more than ten minutes when they crossed a creek by a wooden bridge and came to a row of mean houses standing flush with the street. At the door of one, an old black woman had stooped to lift a large basket, piled high with laundered clothes.
  2. (transitive, slang) To steal.
    • 1919, Rudyard Kipling, The Ballad of East and West
      Kamal is out with twenty men to raise the Border side,
      And he has lifted the Colonel’s mare that is the Colonel’s pride.
  3. (transitive, slang) To source directly without acknowledgement; to plagiarise.
  4. (transitive, slang) To arrest (a person).
    • 2000, Marie Smyth, Marie-Therese Fay, Personal Accounts From Northern Ireland’s Troubles
      Maybe the police lifted him and he’s in Castlereagh [Interrogation Centre] because he’d been lifted three or four times previously and took to Castlereagh. They used to come in and raid the house and take him away.
  5. (transitive) To remove (a ban, restriction, etc.).
  6. (transitive) To alleviate, to lighten (pressure, tension, stress, etc.)
  7. (transitive) to cause to move upwards.
  8. (informal, intransitive) To lift weights; to weight-lift.
  9. To try to raise something; to exert the strength for raising or bearing.
    • strained by lifting at a weight too heavy
  10. To elevate or improve in rank, condition, etc.; often with up.
    • The Roman virtues lift up mortal man.
    • being lifted up with pride
  11. (obsolete) To bear; to support.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  12. To collect, as moneys due; to raise.
  13. (programming) To transform (a function) into a corresponding function in a different context.
  14. (finance) To buy a security or other asset previously offered for sale.
  15. (hunting, transitive) To take (hounds) off the existing scent and move them to another spot.
    • 1885, Lina Chaworth Musters, Book of Hunting Songs and Sport (page 144)
      I lifted the hounds (hoping to catch the leading ones there) to the far side of Hallaton Thorns.
Usage notes

Lift also has an obsolete form liftand for the present participle. The strong forms were common until the 17th century in writing and still survive in speech in a few rural dialects.

Hyponyms
  • airlift
Derived terms
  • airlifted
  • lift-off
  • lifting
Translations

References

  • The Dictionary of the Scots Language

Noun

lift (countable and uncountable, plural lifts)

  1. An act of lifting or raising.
  2. The act of transporting someone in a vehicle; a ride; a trip.
    He gave me a lift to the bus station.
  3. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) Mechanical device for vertically transporting goods or people between floors in a building; an elevator.
  4. An upward force, such as the force that keeps aircraft aloft.
  5. (measurement) The difference in elevation between the upper pool and lower pool of a waterway, separated by lock.
  6. (historical slang) A thief.
    • 1977, Gãmini Salgãdo, The Elizabethan Underworld, Folio Society 2006, page 32:
      The lift came into the shop dressed like a country gentleman, but was careful not to have a cloak about him, so that the tradesman could see he had no opportunity to conceal any goods about his person.
  7. (dance) The lifting of a dance partner into the air.
  8. Permanent construction with a built-in platform that is lifted vertically.
  9. An improvement in mood.
    • November 17 2012, BBC Sport: Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham [4]
      The dismissal of a player who left Arsenal for Manchester City before joining Tottenham gave the home players and fans a noticeable lift.
  10. The amount or weight to be lifted.
  11. The space or distance through which anything is lifted.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  12. A rise; a degree of elevation.
  13. A liftgate.
  14. (nautical) A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below, and used for raising or supporting the end of the yard.
  15. (engineering) One of the steps of a cone pulley.
  16. (shoemaking) A layer of leather in the heel of a shoe.
  17. (horology) That portion of the vibration of a balance during which the impulse is given.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Saunier to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • (mechanical device) elevator (US)
  • (act of transporting) ride
  • (upward force) uplift
Derived terms
Translations
See also
  • escalator

Etymology 2

From Middle English lifte, luft, lefte (air, sky, heaven), from Old English lyft (atmosphere, air), from Proto-West Germanic *luftu, from Proto-Germanic *luftuz (roof, sky, air), from Proto-Indo-European *lewp- (to peel, break off, damage).

Cognate with Old High German luft (air) (German Luft), Dutch lucht (air), Old Norse lopt, loft (upper room, sky, air). More at loft.

Noun

lift (usually uncountable, plural lifts)

  1. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland) Air.
  2. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland) The sky; the heavens; firmament; atmosphere.
    • 1836, Joanna Baillie, Witchcraft, Act 1, p.13
      No, no, Leddy! the sun maun be up in the lift whan I venture to her den.
Synonyms
  • (gas or vapour breathed): air
  • (firmament, ethereal region surrounding the earth): atmosphere
  • (the heavens, sky): welkin

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “lift”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • ILTF, flit

Danish

Etymology

From English lift

Noun

lift n (singular definite liftet, plural indefinite lift)

  1. The non-commercial act of transporting someone in a vehicle: ride
  2. boost

Inflection

Noun

lift c (singular definite liften, plural indefinite lifte or lifter)

  1. carrycot
  2. elevator
  3. lift

Inflection


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɪft/
  • Hyphenation: lift
  • Rhymes: -ɪft

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English lift.

Noun

lift m (plural liften, diminutive liftje n)

  1. A lift, an elevator.
  2. A free ride, a lift.
Derived terms
  • goederenlift
  • rolstoellift
  • skilift
  • stoeltjeslift
  • traplift
Related terms
  • liften
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: left

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

lift

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of liften
  2. imperative of liften

Estonian

Etymology

From English lift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlift/

Noun

lift (genitive lifta, partitive lifta)

  1. lift, elevator

Declension


Hungarian

Etymology

Borrowed from English lift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlift]
  • Hyphenation: lift
  • Rhymes: -ift

Noun

lift (plural liftek)

  1. lift, elevator

Declension

Synonyms

  • felvonó (dated)
  • páternoszter (a slow, continuously moving lift or elevator)

Derived terms

  • liftes
  • liftezik

(Compound words):

  • személyzeti lift (lift/elevator for staff)
  • beteglift (lift/elevator for patients in hospitals)
  • sílift
  • teherlift

Further reading

  • lift in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian

Etymology

From English lift, from Middle English liften, lyften, from Old Norse lypta (to lift, air, literally to raise in the air), from Proto-Germanic *luftijaną (to raise in the air), related to *luftuz (roof, air), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *lewp- (to peel, break off, damage) or from a root meaning roof (see *luftuz).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlɪf]
  • Hyphenation: lift

Noun

lift (plural lift-lift, first-person possessive liftku, second-person possessive liftmu, third-person possessive liftnya)

  1. lift, mechanical device for vertically transporting goods or people between floors in a building; an elevator.

Compounds

Further reading

  • “lift” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Italian

Etymology

From English lift.

Noun

lift m (invariable)

  1. lift / elevator operator
  2. (tennis) topspin

Derived terms

  • liftare

Romanian

Etymology

From English lift, French lift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lift/

Noun

lift n (plural lifturi)

  1. elevator, lift
    Synonym: ascensor
  2. (tennis, table tennis, volleyball) A stroke that gives the ball an upward trajection.

Derived terms

  • aerlift
  • lift spațial

Scots

Alternative forms

  • luft

Etymology

From Middle English lift, luft, from Old English lyft.

Noun

lift (plural lifts)

  1. sky, firmament
  2. (Middle Scots) air, atmosphere

References

  • “lift” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From English lift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lîft/

Noun

lȉft m (Cyrillic spelling ли̏фт)

  1. lift, elevator

Declension

Synonyms

  • dȉzalo

Slovak

Etymology

From English lift.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlift/

Noun

lift m (genitive singular liftu, nominative plural lifty, genitive plural liftov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. (colloquial) an elevator, lift

Declension

Synonyms

  • výťah

Derived terms

  • liftový

Further reading

  • lift in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

Uzbek

Etymology

From Russian лифт (lift), from English lift.

Noun

lift (plural liftlar)

  1. elevator, lift

Declension

Related terms

  • liftchi
  • liftyor

Volapük

Noun

lift (nominative plural lifts)

  1. elevator
  2. altitude adjustor

Declension


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