end vs oddment what difference

what is difference between end and oddment

English

Alternative forms

  • ende (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English ende, from Old English ende, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz (compare Dutch einde, German Ende, Norwegian ende, Swedish ände), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos (compare Old Irish ét (end, point), Latin antiae (forelock), Albanian anë (side), Ancient Greek ἀντίος (antíos, opposite), Sanskrit अन्त्य (antya, last)), from *h₂entíos (front, forehead). More at and and anti-.

The verb is from Middle English enden, endien, from Old English endian (to end, to make an end of, complete, finish, abolish, destroy, come to an end, die), from Proto-Germanic *andijōną (to finish, end), denominative from *andijaz.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /ɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Noun

end (plural ends)

  1. The terminal point of something in space or time.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      they followed him… into a sort of a central hall; out of which they could dimly see other long tunnel-like passages branching, passages mysterious and without apparent end.
  2. (by extension) The cessation of an effort, activity, state, or motion.
    Is there no end to this madness?
  3. (by extension) Death.
    He met a terrible end in the jungle.
    I hope the end comes quickly.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act II, scene i:
      Confound your hidden falsehood, and award / Either of you to be the other’s end.
    • 1732, Alexander Pope, (epitaph) On Mr. Gay, in Westminster Abbey:
      A safe companion and and easy friend / Unblamed through life, lamented in thy end.
  4. The most extreme point of an object, especially one that is longer than it is wide.
    Hold the string at both ends.
    My father always sat at the end of the table.
  5. Result.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Act V, scene i:
      O that a man might know / The end of this day’s business ere it come!
  6. A purpose, goal, or aim.
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe, Act III, scene i:
      But, losing her, the End of Living lose.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection in the Formation of a Manly Character, Aphorism VI, page 146:
      When every man is his own end, all things will come to a bad end.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.21:
      There is a long argument to prove that foreign conquest is not the end of the State, showing that many people took the imperialist view.
  7. (cricket) One of the two parts of the ground used as a descriptive name for half of the ground.
  8. (American football) The position at the end of either the offensive or defensive line, a tight end, a split end, a defensive end.
    • 1926, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Penguin 2000, page 11:
      Her husband, among various physical accomplishments, had been one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven […].
  9. (curling) A period of play in which each team throws eight rocks, two per player, in alternating fashion.
  10. (mathematics) An ideal point of a graph or other complex.
  11. That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap.
    odds and ends
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act I, scene iii:
      I clothe my naked villainy / With old odd ends stolen out of holy writ, / And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
  12. One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
  13. (in the plural, slang, African-American Vernacular) Money.
    Don’t give them your ends. You jack that shit!

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “end”: final, ultimate, deep, happy, etc.

Synonyms

  • (final point in space or time): conclusion, limit, terminus, termination
  • See also Thesaurus:goal

Antonyms

  • (final point of something): beginning, start

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: エンド

Translations

Verb

end (third-person singular simple present ends, present participle ending, simple past and past participle ended)

  1. (intransitive, ergative) to come to an end
  2. (transitive) To finish, terminate.
    • And on the seventh day God ended his worke []
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, scene iii:
      If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XLV, lines 7-8:
      But play the man, stand up and end you, / When your sickness is your soul.
Conjugation

Translations

Derived terms

  • ending
  • end up
  • never-ending
  • unending

Anagrams

  • DEN, DNE, Den, Den., NDE, NED, Ned, den, edn., ned

Albanian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Albanian *antis/t, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂n̥t-jes/t (to plait, weave).

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (transitive) to weave
    Synonyms: vej, vegjoj
Derived terms
  • endem

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂endʰ-.

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (intransitive) to bloom, blossom
  2. (transitive) to flyblow
Derived terms
  • endëc
Related terms
  • endë

References


Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse enn, probably from Proto-Germanic *þan (then), like English than, German denn (than, for). For the loss of þ-, cf. Old Norse at (that) from Proto-Germanic *þat (that)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Conjunction

end

  1. than (in comparisons)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse enn, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Adverb

end

  1. still (archaic)
  2. (with interrogatives) no matter, ever
  3. even (in the modern language only in the combination end ikke “not even”)

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnˀ/

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ende (end) with apocope of the final -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

end n (plural enden, diminutive endje n)

  1. end
  2. travel distance
  3. a short length of something (such as a stick or a rope)

Synonyms

  • einde
  • eind

Usage notes

The form end is more informal than both einde and eind and is mainly used colloquially.

Anagrams

  • den

Estonian

Pronoun

end

  1. partitive singular of ise

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English ende.

Noun

end

  1. Alternative form of ende

Etymology 2

From Old English endian.

Verb

end

  1. Alternative form of enden

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnd/, /ɛn/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd, -ɛn
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Homophone: enn

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Anagrams

  • den, ned

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

end

  1. imperative of enda and ende

Vilamovian

Etymology

From Middle High German ende, from Old High German enti.

Pronunciation

Noun

end n

  1. end

Antonyms

  • ofaong


English

Etymology

odd +‎ -ment

Noun

oddment (plural oddments)

  1. A part of something that is left over, such as a piece of cloth.
    Synonyms: fragment, offcut, remainder, remnant, scrap
    • 1926, Ronald Firbank, Concerning the Eccentricities of Cardinal Pirelli, Chapter 6, in The Complete Ronald Firbank, Norfolk, CT: J. Laughlin, p. 667,[5]
      ‘Ps! ps!’ she purred, feeling amorously for her scissors beneath the sumptuous oddments of old church velvet and brocade that she loved to ruffle and ruck.
  2. Something that does not match the things it is with or cannot easily be categorized; a miscellaneous item.
    Synonyms: bits and bobs, bits and pieces, bric-a-brac, odds and ends, odds and sods, whatnot
    • 1901, Rudyard Kipling, Kim, London: Macmillan, 1902, Chapter 9, p. 216,[6]
      The Lahore Museum was larger, but here were more wonders—ghost-daggers and prayer-wheels from Tibet; [] gilt figures of Buddha and little portable lacquer alters; Russian samovars with turquoises on the lid; [] arms of all sorts and kinds, and a thousand other oddments were cased, or piled, or merely thrown into the room []
    • 1937, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1997, Chapter 5, p. 75,[7]
      [] there in his hiding-place he kept a few wretched oddments, and one very beautiful thing, very beautiful, very wonderful.
    • 1974, John Le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, New York: Bantam, 1975, Part 2, Chapter 20, p. 173,[8]
      [The chest] was filled with oddments of reference: large-scale maps, back copies of Who’s Who, old Baedekers.
    • 2000, George R. R. Martin, A Storm of Swords, New York: Bantam, pp. 381-382,[9]
      [] a tall thin man with oddments of old armor buckled on over his ratty pink robes.
  3. (commerce) An item that was originally part of a set but is sold individually; an excess item of stock.
    Synonym: remainder
    • 1985, Jeanette Winterson, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, New York: Atlantic Monthly Press, “Numbers,” p. 79,[10]
      [] she pushed me inside a shop that sold oddments and seconds.
    • 1988, Campbell Armstrong, Mazurka, New York: Harper & Row, 1990, Chapter 11, p. 251,[11]
      Whoever had purchased this supply of arms had scoured all the darker bazaars of the international weapons market, buying a lot here, another lot there, an oddment in a third place.
  4. (printing) A part of a book that is not a portion of the text, such as the title, index, etc. (usually plural).
  5. A person who does not fit in with others or is considered to be strange in some way.
    Synonyms: misfit, oddball, weirdo
    • 1904, Arthur Wing Pinero, Letty, London: Heinemann, Act I, p. 30,[12]
      Oh, I know for a fact that she’s loaned a fiver from the little oddment who has the floor under mine—
    • 1979, Alan Garner, Tom Fobble’s Day, New York: Collins, p. 66,[13]
      “Come on, you daft oddment,” []
    • 1984, Sumner Locke Elliott, About Tilly Beamis, New York: F. Watts, “1951,” p. 131,[14]
      Unlike his mother and sisters he’s not very outgoing and he’s an oddment, scrawny and muscular he has the look of a drover []
  6. A varied collection (of items).
    Synonym: assortment
    • 1862, Edward Bradley (as Cuthbert Bede), “The Agreeable Monk” in The Curate of Cranston; with Other Prose and Verse, London: Saunders, Otley, p. 281,[15]
      [] there are two or three tables, where are newspapers, and some of the latest periodicals and reviews, and a miscellaneous oddment of the current sacred and profane literature, stacked for convenience of reference []
    • 1948, Albert E. Idell, The Great Blizzard, New York: Henry Holt, Part 2, Chapter 2, p. 112,[16]
      [] bearing a tray containing an oddment of cookies, cake, and sandwiches []
    • 2007, Nuruddin Farah, Knots, New York: Riverhead Books, Chapter 11, p. 139,[17]
      “Since you won’t let my taxi in,” she says, “please let the driver bring out of the trunk of his taxi my oddment of purchases.”
  7. A remaining number or amount (after a calculation).
    Synonym: remainder
    • 1821, John Clare, “The Cross Roads” in The Village Minstrel, and Other Poems, London: Taylor and Hessey, Volume 2, p. 85,[18]
      I’m your age treble [i.e. three times your age], with some oddments to’t,
    • 1877, Robert Roberts (ed.), The Apophthegmes of Erasmus Translated into English by Nicolas Udall, Boston, Lincolnshire: Robert Roberts, Appendix, p. 459,[19]
      When they went to market, a basket of eggs was one of their most frequent charges, and in making their purchases at various shops the tradesman would often be asked “to take eggs for money” to a certain extent; especially when the sum to pay left an “oddment,” such as 4d. or 8d.
    • 1919, George Wyman Bury, Pan-Islam, London: Macmillan, Chapter 2, p. 58,[20]
      I believe he expected me to give him a receipt in round hundreds and take the “oddment,” as we call it in Warwickshire, for myself.
    • 1967, Cottie Arthur Burland, The Gods of Mexico, New York: Putnam, Chapter 7, p. 73,[21]
      [] the agricultural year was divided up into eighteen periods of twenty days, with an oddment of five days at its end.
    • 1974, Francis Hill, Victorian Lincoln, Cambridge University Press, Chapter 3, p. 48,[22]
      Of the surplus the bulk was invested, and an oddment swept into the borough fund.
  8. Something strange or unusual.
    Synonym: oddity
    • 1955, MacKinlay Kantor, Andersonville, Cleveland: World Publishing Co., Chapter 24, p. 266,[23]
      How did he come to join the cavalry?
      That was an oddment.
    • 1964, Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, New York: New American Library, Chapter 31, p. 281,[24]
      [] TV fosters many preferences that are quite at variance with literate uniformity and repeatability. It has sent Americans questing for every sort of oddment and quaintness in objects from out of their storied past. Many Americans will now spare no pains or expense to get to taste some new wine or food.
    • 2001, Ann Rinaldi, The Coffin Quilt, San Diego: Harcourt, Chapter 22, p. 142,[25]
      I thought it an oddment that Alifair, with all her powers and her healing meetings, had needed Ro, a sinner, to make her well.

Translations

References


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