end vs terminal what difference

what is difference between end and terminal

English

Alternative forms

  • ende (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English ende, from Old English ende, from Proto-Germanic *andijaz (compare Dutch einde, German Ende, Norwegian ende, Swedish ände), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entíos (compare Old Irish ét (end, point), Latin antiae (forelock), Albanian anë (side), Ancient Greek ἀντίος (antíos, opposite), Sanskrit अन्त्य (antya, last)), from *h₂entíos (front, forehead). More at and and anti-.

The verb is from Middle English enden, endien, from Old English endian (to end, to make an end of, complete, finish, abolish, destroy, come to an end, die), from Proto-Germanic *andijōną (to finish, end), denominative from *andijaz.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕnd, IPA(key): /ɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd

Noun

end (plural ends)

  1. The terminal point of something in space or time.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows:
      they followed him… into a sort of a central hall; out of which they could dimly see other long tunnel-like passages branching, passages mysterious and without apparent end.
  2. (by extension) The cessation of an effort, activity, state, or motion.
    Is there no end to this madness?
  3. (by extension) Death.
    He met a terrible end in the jungle.
    I hope the end comes quickly.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act II, scene i:
      Confound your hidden falsehood, and award / Either of you to be the other’s end.
    • 1732, Alexander Pope, (epitaph) On Mr. Gay, in Westminster Abbey:
      A safe companion and and easy friend / Unblamed through life, lamented in thy end.
  4. The most extreme point of an object, especially one that is longer than it is wide.
    Hold the string at both ends.
    My father always sat at the end of the table.
  5. Result.
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Act V, scene i:
      O that a man might know / The end of this day’s business ere it come!
  6. A purpose, goal, or aim.
    • 1675, John Dryden, Aureng-zebe, Act III, scene i:
      But, losing her, the End of Living lose.
    • 1825, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Aids to Reflection in the Formation of a Manly Character, Aphorism VI, page 146:
      When every man is his own end, all things will come to a bad end.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.21:
      There is a long argument to prove that foreign conquest is not the end of the State, showing that many people took the imperialist view.
  7. (cricket) One of the two parts of the ground used as a descriptive name for half of the ground.
  8. (American football) The position at the end of either the offensive or defensive line, a tight end, a split end, a defensive end.
    • 1926, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Penguin 2000, page 11:
      Her husband, among various physical accomplishments, had been one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven […].
  9. (curling) A period of play in which each team throws eight rocks, two per player, in alternating fashion.
  10. (mathematics) An ideal point of a graph or other complex.
  11. That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap.
    odds and ends
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Richard the Third, Act I, scene iii:
      I clothe my naked villainy / With old odd ends stolen out of holy writ, / And seem a saint, when most I play the devil.
  12. One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
  13. (in the plural, slang, African-American Vernacular) Money.
    Don’t give them your ends. You jack that shit!

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often used with “end”: final, ultimate, deep, happy, etc.

Synonyms

  • (final point in space or time): conclusion, limit, terminus, termination
  • See also Thesaurus:goal

Antonyms

  • (final point of something): beginning, start

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: エンド

Translations

Verb

end (third-person singular simple present ends, present participle ending, simple past and past participle ended)

  1. (intransitive, ergative) to come to an end
  2. (transitive) To finish, terminate.
    • And on the seventh day God ended his worke []
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, scene iii:
      If thou keep promise, I shall end this strife
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XLV, lines 7-8:
      But play the man, stand up and end you, / When your sickness is your soul.
Conjugation

Translations

Derived terms

  • ending
  • end up
  • never-ending
  • unending

Anagrams

  • DEN, DNE, Den, Den., NDE, NED, Ned, den, edn., ned

Albanian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Albanian *antis/t, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂n̥t-jes/t (to plait, weave).

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (transitive) to weave
    Synonyms: vej, vegjoj
Derived terms
  • endem

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂endʰ-.

Verb

end (first-person singular past tense enda, participle endur)

  1. (intransitive) to bloom, blossom
  2. (transitive) to flyblow
Derived terms
  • endëc
Related terms
  • endë

References


Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse enn, probably from Proto-Germanic *þan (then), like English than, German denn (than, for). For the loss of þ-, cf. Old Norse at (that) from Proto-Germanic *þat (that)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Conjunction

end

  1. than (in comparisons)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse enn, from Proto-Germanic *andi, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂entí.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛn/

Adverb

end

  1. still (archaic)
  2. (with interrogatives) no matter, ever
  3. even (in the modern language only in the combination end ikke “not even”)

Etymology 3

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnˀ/

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ende (end) with apocope of the final -e.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

end n (plural enden, diminutive endje n)

  1. end
  2. travel distance
  3. a short length of something (such as a stick or a rope)

Synonyms

  • einde
  • eind

Usage notes

The form end is more informal than both einde and eind and is mainly used colloquially.

Anagrams

  • den

Estonian

Pronoun

end

  1. partitive singular of ise

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English ende.

Noun

end

  1. Alternative form of ende

Etymology 2

From Old English endian.

Verb

end

  1. Alternative form of enden

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnd/, /ɛn/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd, -ɛn
  • Hyphenation: end
  • Homophone: enn

Verb

end

  1. imperative of ende

Anagrams

  • den, ned

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

end

  1. imperative of enda and ende

Vilamovian

Etymology

From Middle High German ende, from Old High German enti.

Pronunciation

Noun

end n

  1. end

Antonyms

  • ofaong


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin terminalis (pertaining to a boundary or to the end, terminal, final), from Latin terminus (a bound, boundary, limit, end). See term, terminus.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈtɚmɪnəl/

Noun

terminal (plural terminals)

  1. A building in an airport where passengers transfer from ground transportation to the facilities that allow them to board airplanes.
  2. A harbour facility where ferries embark and disembark passengers and load and unload vehicles.
  3. A rail station where service begins and ends; the end of the line. For example: Grand Central Terminal in New York City.
  4. A rate charged on all freight, regardless of distance, and supposed to cover the expenses of station service, as distinct from mileage rate, generally proportionate to the distance and intended to cover movement expenses.
  5. A town lying at the end of a railroad, in which the terminal is located; more properly called a terminus.
  6. A storage tank for bulk liquids (such as oil or chemicals) prior to further distribution.
  7. (electronics) the end of a line where signals are either transmitted or received, or a point along the length of a line where the signals are made available to apparatus.
  8. An electric contact on a battery.
  9. (telecommunications) The apparatus to send and/or receive signals on a line, such as a telephone or network device.
  10. (computing) A device for entering data into a computer or a communications system and/or displaying data received, especially a device equipped with a keyboard and some sort of textual display.
  11. (computing) A computer program that emulates a physical terminal.
  12. (computing theory) A terminal symbol in a formal grammar.
  13. (biology) The end ramification (of an axon, etc.) or one of the extremities of a polypeptide.

Derived terms

  • coterminal

Related terms

Descendants

  • Japanese: ターミナル (tāminaru)
  • Korean: 터미널 (teomineol)

Translations

Adjective

terminal (comparative more terminal, superlative most terminal)

  1. Fatal; resulting in death.
    terminal cancer
  2. Appearing at the end; top or apex of a physical object.
  3. Occurring at the end of a word, sentence, or period of time, and serves to terminate it
  4. (archaic) Occurring every term; termly.
    a student’s terminal fees

Synonyms

  • (appearing at the end): endly, final, late, endsome

Antonyms

  • non-terminal
  • (illness): early
  • (appearing at the end): initial, early

Derived terms

  • terminally
  • terminal moraine

Translations

Verb

terminal (third-person singular simple present terminals, present participle terminaling or terminalling, simple past and past participle terminaled or terminalled)

  1. To store bulk liquids (such as oil or chemicals) in storage tanks prior to further distribution.

Further reading

  • terminal in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • terminal in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • trailmen, tram line, tramline

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin terminalis, from Latin terminus.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /təɾ.miˈnal/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /tər.miˈnal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /teɾ.miˈnal/

Adjective

terminal (masculine and feminine plural terminals)

  1. terminal

Related terms

  • terminar
  • terme

Noun

terminal m (plural terminals)

  1. (computing) terminal

Cebuano

Etymology

From English terminal, from French terminal, from Late Latin terminalis (pertaining to a boundary or to the end, terminal, final), from Latin terminus (a bound, boundary, limit, end).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ter‧mi‧nal

Noun

terminal

  1. a terminus
  2. an airport terminal
  3. a port terminal
  4. a rail station

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin terminalis, from Latin terminus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛʁ.mi.nal/
  • Homophones: terminale, terminales

Adjective

terminal (feminine singular terminale, masculine plural terminaux, feminine plural terminales)

  1. terminal

Derived terms

  • choc terminal

Related terms

  • terminer

Noun

terminal m (plural terminaux)

  1. terminal

Further reading

  • “terminal” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

German

Adjective

terminal (not comparable)

  1. terminal

Declension

Further reading

  • “terminal” in Duden online

Indonesian

Etymology

From English terminal, from Late Latin terminalis (pertaining to a boundary or to the end, terminal, final), from Latin terminus (a bound, boundary, limit, end).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [t̪ɛrˈminal], [t̪ərˈminal]
  • Hyphenation: tèr‧mi‧nal

Noun

terminal (plural terminal-terminal, first-person possessive terminalku, second-person possessive terminalmu, third-person possessive terminalnya)

  1. terminal:
    1. (transport) facility to embark and disembark passengers.
      Synonym: stasiun
    2. (computing) a device for entering data into a computer or a communications system and/or displaying data received, especially a device equipped with a keyboard and some sort of textual display.

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “terminal” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin terminus, via English terminal

Pronunciation

Noun

terminal m (definite singular terminalen, indefinite plural terminaler, definite plural terminalene)

  1. a terminal

Derived terms

  • ferjeterminal
  • flyterminal
  • godsterminal

References

  • “terminal” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin terminus, via English terminal

Noun

terminal m (definite singular terminalen, indefinite plural terminalar, definite plural terminalane)

  1. a terminal

Derived terms

  • ferjeterminal
  • flyterminal
  • godsterminal

References

  • “terminal” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From English terminal, from Late Latin terminālis, from Latin terminus.

Pronunciation

Noun

terminal m inan

  1. airport terminal (building at an airport from which passengers board the planes)
  2. transportation hub
  3. computer terminal (device for entering data into a computer)

Declension


Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin terminalis, from Latin terminus.

Adjective

terminal m or f (plural terminais, comparable)

  1. relating to or occurring during the conclusion or end of something
  2. (of a disease) terminal (resulting in death)

Noun

terminal m (plural terminais)

  1. terminal (section of a station or airport where passengers board the vehicle or craft)
  2. (electronics) terminal (the end of a line where signals are transmitted or received)
  3. (computing) terminal (device for entering and displaying data)
  4. (computing) terminal (computer program that emulates a terminal)

Romanian

Etymology

From French terminale

Adjective

terminal m or n (feminine singular terminală, masculine plural terminali, feminine and neuter plural terminale)

  1. terminal

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin terminālis, from Latin terminus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /teɾmiˈnal/, [t̪eɾ.miˈnal]

Adjective

terminal (plural terminales)

  1. final, last
    Synonyms: último, final
    Antonym: primero
  2. terminal, fatal (resulting in death)
  3. terminally ill

Derived terms

  • paraterminal

Noun

terminal m or f (plural terminales)

  1. terminal (a building in an airport where passengers transfer from ground transportation to airplanes)
  2. terminal (a device for entering data into a computer)

Noun

terminal m (plural terminales)

  1. mobile phone
    Synonyms: teléfono móvil, teléfono celular

Related terms

  • terminar
  • término

Further reading

  • “terminal” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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