endure vs suffer what difference

what is difference between endure and suffer

English

Alternative forms

  • enduer (obsolete)
  • indure (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English enduren, from Old French endurer, from Latin indūrō (to make hard). Displaced Old English drēogan, which survives dialectally as dree.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪnˈdjʊə̯(ɹ)/, /ɪnˈdjɔː(ɹ)/, /ɪnˈd͡ʒʊə̯(ɹ)/, /ɪnˈd͡ʒɔː(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈd(j)ʊɹ/
  • Rhymes: -ʊə(r)

Verb

endure (third-person singular simple present endures, present participle enduring, simple past and past participle endured)

  1. (intransitive) To continue or carry on, despite obstacles or hardships; to persist.
    The singer’s popularity endured for decades.
  2. (transitive) To tolerate or put up with something unpleasant.
  3. (intransitive) To last.
    Our love will endure forever.
  4. To remain firm, as under trial or suffering; to suffer patiently or without yielding; to bear up under adversity; to hold out.
  5. (transitive) To suffer patiently.
    He endured years of pain.
  6. (obsolete) To indurate.

Synonyms

  • (to continue despite obstacles): carry on, plug away; See also Thesaurus:persevere
  • (to tolerate something): bear, thole, take; See also Thesaurus:tolerate
  • (to last): go on, hold on, persist; See also Thesaurus:persist
  • (to remain firm): resist, survive, withstand
  • (to suffer patiently): accept, thole, withstand
  • (to indurate):

Related terms

  • endurance
  • enduring
  • enduro
  • duress

Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “endure”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • durene, enduer, enured, reuned

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.dyʁ/

Verb

endure

  1. first-person singular present indicative of endurer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of endurer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of endurer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of endurer
  5. second-person singular imperative of endurer

Anagrams

  • rendue


English

Etymology

From Middle English suffren, from Anglo-Norman suffrir, from Latin sufferō (to offer, hold up, bear, suffer), from sub- (up, under) + ferō (I carry), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to bear, carry). Displaced native teen.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsʌfə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈsʌfɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌfə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: suf‧fer

Verb

suffer (third-person singular simple present suffers, present participle suffering, simple past and past participle suffered)

  1. (intransitive) To undergo hardship.
    Synonym: bear
  2. (intransitive) To feel pain.
    Synonyms: agonize, anguish, thole; see also Thesaurus:suffer
  3. (intransitive) To become worse.
    Synonyms: deteriorate, worsen; see also Thesaurus:worsen
  4. (transitive) To endure, undergo.
    Synonyms: bear, dree, thole; see also Thesaurus:tolerate
  5. (transitive, archaic, law) To allow.
    Synonym: permit
    • 1938, The U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act, 29 U.S.C. § 203:
      “Employ” includes to suffer or permit to work.
    • 1978, Section 31-36 of the Code of Montgomery County, Maryland:
      [] it shall be unlawful for any person to cause, allow, permit or suffer any vehicle to be parked [] beyond the period of time established by the duration of the parking meter []

Derived terms

Related terms

  • sublate
  • sublation

Translations

Anagrams

  • ruffes, suffre

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ʏfər

Etymology 1

Adjective

suffer

  1. Comparative form of suf

Etymology 2

Noun

suffer m (plural suffers)

  1. Alternative form of sufferd

Latin

Verb

suffer

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of sufferō

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