enervate vs faze what difference

what is difference between enervate and faze

English

Etymology

From Latin ēnervātus, past participle of ēnervō (to weaken).

Pronunciation

  • (verb): IPA(key): /ˌɛn.ə(ɹ)ˈveɪt/ (UK)
  • (adjective): IPA(key): /ˈɛn.ə(ɹ).vət/ (UK)

Verb

enervate (third-person singular simple present enervates, present participle enervating, simple past and past participle enervated)

  1. (transitive) To reduce strength or energy; debilitate.
    After being laid off three times in a row, she felt too enervated to look for another job.
  2. (transitive) To weaken morally or mentally.
  3. (medicine) To partially or completely remove a nerve.

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:enervate.

Synonyms

  • (reduce strength): debilitate, weaken

Antonyms

  • (reduce strength): strengthen, revive
  • (reduce morally, mentally): bolster

Translations

Adjective

enervate (comparative more enervate, superlative most enervate)

  1. Made feeble; weakened.

Anagrams

  • venerate

Latin

Participle

ēnervāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of ēnervātus


English

Alternative forms

  • phase (see notes)

Etymology

From English dialectal (Kentish) feeze, feese (to alarm, discomfit, frighten), from Middle English fēsen (to chase, drive away; put to flight; discomfit, frighten, terrify), from Old English fēsan, fȳsan (to send forth; to hasten, impel, stimulate; to banish, drive away, put to flight; to prepare oneself), from Proto-Germanic *funsijaną (to predispose, make favourable; to make ready), from Proto-Indo-European *pent- (to go; to walk). The word is cognate with Old Norse fýsa (to drive, goad; to admonish), Old Saxon fūsian (to strive).

Citations for faze in the Oxford English Dictionary start in 1830, and usage was established by 1890.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: fāz, IPA(key): /feɪz/
  • Homophone: phase
  • Rhymes: -eɪz

Verb

faze (third-person singular simple present fazes, present participle fazing, simple past and past participle fazed)

  1. (transitive, informal) To frighten or cause hesitation; to daunt, put off (usually used in the negative); to disconcert, to perturb. [from mid 19th c.]

Usage notes

The spelling phase is sometimes used for faze; including by such notables as Mark Twain and The New York Times.

Alternative forms

  • feaze

Derived terms

  • unfazed

Translations

References


Kabuverdianu

Verb

faze

  1. do, make

Etymology

From Portuguese fazer.

References

  • Gonçalves, Manuel (2015) Capeverdean Creole-English dictionary, →ISBN

Portuguese

Verb

faze

  1. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of fazer

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfaze]

Noun

faze f

  1. indefinite plural of fază
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of fază

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