engage vs mesh what difference

what is difference between engage and mesh

English

Alternative forms

  • ingage (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English engagen, from Old French engagier (to pledge, engage), from Frankish *anwadjōn (to pledge), from Proto-Germanic *an-, *andi- + Proto-Germanic *wadjōną (to pledge, secure), from Proto-Germanic *wadją (pledge, guarantee), from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰ- (to pledge, redeem a pledge; guarantee, bail), equivalent to en- +‎ gage. Cognate with Old English anwedd (pledge, security), Old English weddian (to engage, covenant, undertake), German wetten (to bet, wager), Icelandic veðja (to wager). More at wed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈɡeɪdʒ/, /ɛnˈɡeɪdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Verb

engage (third-person singular simple present engages, present participle engaging, simple past and past participle engaged)

  1. (heading, transitive) To interact socially.
    1. To engross or hold the attention of; to keep busy or occupied.
    2. To draw into conversation.
      • the difficult task of engaging him in conversation
    3. To attract, to please; (archaic) to fascinate or win over (someone).
      • Good nature engages everybody to him.
  2. (heading) To interact antagonistically.
    1. (transitive) To enter into conflict with (an enemy).
      • 1698-1699, Edmund Ludlow, Memoirs
        a favourable opportunity of engaging the enemy
    2. (intransitive) To enter into battle.
  3. (heading) To interact contractually.
    1. (transitive) To arrange to employ or use (a worker, a space, etc.).
    2. (intransitive) To guarantee or promise (to do something).
    3. (transitive) To bind through legal or moral obligation (to do something, especially to marry) (usually in passive).
    4. (obsolete, transitive) To pledge, pawn (one’s property); to put (something) at risk or on the line; to mortgage (houses, land).
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vii:
        Thou that doest liue in later times, must wage / Thy workes for wealth, and life for gold engage.
  4. (heading) To interact mechanically.
    1. To mesh or interlock (of machinery, especially a clutch).
    2. (engineering, transitive) To come into gear with.
      The teeth of one cogwheel engage those of another.
  5. (intransitive) To enter into (an activity), to participate (construed with in).
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To entangle.

Antonyms

  • (to cause to mesh or interlock): disengage

Derived terms

  • engagement
  • disengage
  • disengagement

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.ɡaʒ/

Verb

engage

  1. first-person singular present indicative of engager
  2. third-person singular present indicative of engager
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of engager
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of engager
  5. second-person singular imperative of engager

Anagrams

  • gagnée


English

Etymology

From Middle English mesche, from Old English masc (net) (perhaps influenced in form by related Old English mæscre (mesh, spot)) both from Proto-Germanic *maskrǭ, *maskwǭ, from Proto-Indo-European *mezg- (to knit, twist, plait). Akin to Old High German māsca (mesh), Old Saxon maska (net), Old Norse mǫskvi, mǫskun (mesh).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɛʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃ

Noun

mesh (plural meshes)

  1. A structure made of connected strands of metal, fiber, or other flexible/ductile material, with evenly spaced openings between them.
  2. The opening or space enclosed by the threads of a net between knot and knot, or the threads enclosing such a space.
  3. The engagement of the teeth of wheels, or of a wheel and rack.
  4. A measure of fineness (particle size) of ground material. A powder that passes through a sieve having 300 openings per linear inch but does not pass 400 openings per linear inch is said to be -300 +400 mesh.
  5. (computer graphics) A polygon mesh.

Synonyms

  • (space and threads): lattice, network, net

Derived terms

  • mesh number
  • navmesh
  • polymesh
  • submesh

Translations

Verb

mesh (third-person singular simple present meshes, present participle meshing, simple past and past participle meshed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To connect together by interlocking, as gears do.
  2. (intransitive, figuratively, by extension) To fit in; to come together harmoniously.
  3. (transitive) To catch in a mesh.
    • a. 1547, Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, “Description of the fickle affections, pangs, and slights of love”
      I know how loue doth rage vpon a yelding minde:
      How smal a net may take and meash a hart of gentle kinde

Translations

Anagrams

  • Hems, Mehs, Shem, hems, mehs

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