engage vs pursue what difference

what is difference between engage and pursue

English

Alternative forms

  • ingage (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English engagen, from Old French engagier (to pledge, engage), from Frankish *anwadjōn (to pledge), from Proto-Germanic *an-, *andi- + Proto-Germanic *wadjōną (to pledge, secure), from Proto-Germanic *wadją (pledge, guarantee), from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰ- (to pledge, redeem a pledge; guarantee, bail), equivalent to en- +‎ gage. Cognate with Old English anwedd (pledge, security), Old English weddian (to engage, covenant, undertake), German wetten (to bet, wager), Icelandic veðja (to wager). More at wed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈɡeɪdʒ/, /ɛnˈɡeɪdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Verb

engage (third-person singular simple present engages, present participle engaging, simple past and past participle engaged)

  1. (heading, transitive) To interact socially.
    1. To engross or hold the attention of; to keep busy or occupied.
    2. To draw into conversation.
      • the difficult task of engaging him in conversation
    3. To attract, to please; (archaic) to fascinate or win over (someone).
      • Good nature engages everybody to him.
  2. (heading) To interact antagonistically.
    1. (transitive) To enter into conflict with (an enemy).
      • 1698-1699, Edmund Ludlow, Memoirs
        a favourable opportunity of engaging the enemy
    2. (intransitive) To enter into battle.
  3. (heading) To interact contractually.
    1. (transitive) To arrange to employ or use (a worker, a space, etc.).
    2. (intransitive) To guarantee or promise (to do something).
    3. (transitive) To bind through legal or moral obligation (to do something, especially to marry) (usually in passive).
    4. (obsolete, transitive) To pledge, pawn (one’s property); to put (something) at risk or on the line; to mortgage (houses, land).
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vii:
        Thou that doest liue in later times, must wage / Thy workes for wealth, and life for gold engage.
  4. (heading) To interact mechanically.
    1. To mesh or interlock (of machinery, especially a clutch).
    2. (engineering, transitive) To come into gear with.
      The teeth of one cogwheel engage those of another.
  5. (intransitive) To enter into (an activity), to participate (construed with in).
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To entangle.

Antonyms

  • (to cause to mesh or interlock): disengage

Derived terms

  • engagement
  • disengage
  • disengagement

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.ɡaʒ/

Verb

engage

  1. first-person singular present indicative of engager
  2. third-person singular present indicative of engager
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of engager
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of engager
  5. second-person singular imperative of engager

Anagrams

  • gagnée


English

Etymology

From Middle English pursuen, from Anglo-Norman pursure, poursuire etc., from Latin prōsequor (though influenced by persequor). Doublet of prosecute.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pəˈsjuː/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /pəˈʃuː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /pɚˈsu/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /pəˈʃu/

Verb

pursue (third-person singular simple present pursues, present participle pursuing, simple past and past participle pursued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To follow urgently, originally with intent to capture or harm; to chase. [from 14th c.]
    • 1382–1395, John Wycliffe et al. (translators), John xv. 20
      The servant is not greater than his lord. If they have pursued me, they shall pursue you also.
    • 2009, Martin Chulov, ‘Iraqi shoe-thrower claims he suffered torture in jail’, The Guardian, 15 Sep 09:
      He now feared for his life, and believed US intelligence agents would pursue him.
  2. (transitive) To follow, travel down (a particular way, course of action etc.). [from late 14th c.]
    Her rival pursued a quite different course.
  3. (transitive) To aim for, go after (a specified objective, situation etc.). [from late 14th c.]
    • 2009, Benjamin Pogrund, ‘Freeze won’t hurt Netanyahu’, The Guardian, 1 Dec 09:
      He even stands to gain in world terms: his noisy critics strengthen his projected image of a man determined to pursue peace with Palestinians.
  4. (transitive) To participate in (an activity, business etc.); to practise, follow (a profession). [from 15th c.]
  5. (intransitive) To act as a legal prosecutor.

Derived terms

  • pursuer

Related terms

  • pursual
  • pursuant
  • pursuit

Translations

See also

  • follow
  • chase

Anagrams

  • sure up

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