engage vs rent what difference

what is difference between engage and rent

English

Alternative forms

  • ingage (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English engagen, from Old French engagier (to pledge, engage), from Frankish *anwadjōn (to pledge), from Proto-Germanic *an-, *andi- + Proto-Germanic *wadjōną (to pledge, secure), from Proto-Germanic *wadją (pledge, guarantee), from Proto-Indo-European *wedʰ- (to pledge, redeem a pledge; guarantee, bail), equivalent to en- +‎ gage. Cognate with Old English anwedd (pledge, security), Old English weddian (to engage, covenant, undertake), German wetten (to bet, wager), Icelandic veðja (to wager). More at wed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈɡeɪdʒ/, /ɛnˈɡeɪdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ

Verb

engage (third-person singular simple present engages, present participle engaging, simple past and past participle engaged)

  1. (heading, transitive) To interact socially.
    1. To engross or hold the attention of; to keep busy or occupied.
    2. To draw into conversation.
      • the difficult task of engaging him in conversation
    3. To attract, to please; (archaic) to fascinate or win over (someone).
      • Good nature engages everybody to him.
  2. (heading) To interact antagonistically.
    1. (transitive) To enter into conflict with (an enemy).
      • 1698-1699, Edmund Ludlow, Memoirs
        a favourable opportunity of engaging the enemy
    2. (intransitive) To enter into battle.
  3. (heading) To interact contractually.
    1. (transitive) To arrange to employ or use (a worker, a space, etc.).
    2. (intransitive) To guarantee or promise (to do something).
    3. (transitive) To bind through legal or moral obligation (to do something, especially to marry) (usually in passive).
    4. (obsolete, transitive) To pledge, pawn (one’s property); to put (something) at risk or on the line; to mortgage (houses, land).
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.vii:
        Thou that doest liue in later times, must wage / Thy workes for wealth, and life for gold engage.
  4. (heading) To interact mechanically.
    1. To mesh or interlock (of machinery, especially a clutch).
    2. (engineering, transitive) To come into gear with.
      The teeth of one cogwheel engage those of another.
  5. (intransitive) To enter into (an activity), to participate (construed with in).
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To entangle.

Antonyms

  • (to cause to mesh or interlock): disengage

Derived terms

  • engagement
  • disengage
  • disengagement

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.ɡaʒ/

Verb

engage

  1. first-person singular present indicative of engager
  2. third-person singular present indicative of engager
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of engager
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of engager
  5. second-person singular imperative of engager

Anagrams

  • gagnée


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rĕnt, IPA(key): /ɹɛnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Etymology 1

From Middle English rent, rente, from Old English renta, from Old French rente and Medieval Latin renta, both from Vulgar Latin *rendere, from Latin reddere, present active infinitive of reddō.

Noun

rent (countable and uncountable, plural rents)

  1. A payment made by a tenant at intervals in order to occupy a property.
    I am asking £100 a week rent.
  2. A similar payment for the use of equipment or a service.
  3. (economics) A profit from possession of a valuable right, as a restricted license to engage in a trade or business.
  4. An object for which rent is charged or paid.
  5. (obsolete) Income; revenue.
    • [Bacchus] a wastor was and all his rent / In wine and bordel he dispent.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Finnish: ränttü
Translations

Verb

rent (third-person singular simple present rents, present participle renting, simple past and past participle rented)

  1. (transitive) To occupy premises in exchange for rent.
  2. (transitive) To grant occupation in return for rent.
  3. (transitive) To obtain or have temporary possession of an object (e.g. a movie) in exchange for money.
  4. (intransitive) To be leased or let for rent.
Translations
See also
  • hire

Etymology 2

From Middle English renten (to tear). Variant form of renden.

Noun

rent (plural rents)

  1. A tear or rip in some surface.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 10
      The brown paint on the door was so old that the naked wood showed between the rents.
  2. A division or schism.
    • 2002, Michael B. Oren, Six Days of War: June 1967:
      [] the White House was considering sending Vice President Humphrey to Cairo to patch up the many rents in U.S.—Egyptian relations.
Translations

Verb

rent

  1. simple past tense and past participle of rend

Adjective

rent (comparative more rent, superlative most rent)

  1. That has been torn or rent; ripped; torn.

Anagrams

  • tern, tren

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /reːˀnt/, [ˈʁæˀnd̥]

Adjective

rent

  1. neuter singular of ren

Adverb

rent

  1. purely (morally)
  2. purely (excluding other possibility)
  3. quite, completely

Derived terms

  • gøre rent (to clean)
  • rent ud (point-blank)

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɛnt
  • IPA(key): /rɛnt/

Verb

rent

  1. second- and third-person singular present indicative of rennen
  2. (archaic) plural imperative of rennen

Norwegian Bokmål

Adjective

rent

  1. neuter singular of ren

Adverb

rent

  1. purely

Verb

rent

  1. past participle of renne

References

  • “ren” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

rent

  1. past participle of renna

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /reːnt/

Adjective

rent

  1. absolute indefinite neuter singular of ren.

Adverb

rent (comparative renare, superlative renast)

  1. cleanly
  2. purely

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