engineer vs technologist what difference

what is difference between engineer and technologist

English

Etymology

From Middle English engyneour, engineour, from Old French engigneor, engignier, from engin or from Medieval Latin ingeniator (one who creates or one who uses an engine), from ingenium (nature, native talent, skill), from in (in) + gignere (to beget, produce), Old Latin genere; see ingenious hence “one who produces or generates [new] things”. Sometimes erroneously linked with engine +‎ -eer (Can this(+) etymology be sourced?).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˌɛnd͡ʒɪˈnɪɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˌɛnd͡ʒɪˈnɪə/
  • Hyphenation: en‧gi‧neer
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(ɹ)

Noun

engineer (plural engineers)

  1. A person who is qualified or professionally engaged in any branch of engineering.
  2. (Philippines) A title given to an engineer.
  3. (chiefly US) A person who controls motion of substance (such as a locomotive).
  4. (nautical) A person employed in the engine room of a ship.

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often applied to “engineer”: agricultural, mechanical, electrical, civil, architectural, environmental, industrial, optical, nuclear, structural, chemical, military, electronic, professional, chartered, licensed, certified, qualified.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Burmese: အင်ဂျင်နီယာ (anggyangniya)
  • Hawaiian: ʻenekinia
  • Hindi: इंजीनियर (iñjīniyar)
  • Japanese: エンジニア (enjinia)

Translations

Verb

engineer (third-person singular simple present engineers, present participle engineering, simple past and past participle engineered)

  1. (transitive) To design, construct or manage something as an engineer.
  2. (transitive) To alter or construct something by means of genetic engineering.
  3. (transitive) To plan or achieve some goal by contrivance or guile; to wangle or finagle.
  4. (transitive) To control motion of substance; to change motion.
  5. (intransitive, obsolete) To work as an engineer.

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • engineer in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • engineer in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “engineer”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • re-engine, reengine


English

Etymology

technolog(y) +‎ -ist

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, UK) IPA(key): /tɛkˈnɒləd͡ʒɪst/
  • (US) IPA(key): /tɛkˈnɑləd͡ʒɪst/

Noun

technologist (plural technologists)

  1. A scientist or an engineer who specializes in a particular technology, or who uses technology in a particular field.
    • 2012, David Blockley, Engineering: A Very Short Introduction (309), chapter 1, page 16:
      Gravity, heat, [and] electromagnetism…are the natural phenomena that scientists study and that engineers and technologists use to make their tools.

Usage notes

  • Technologist is usually preceded by the name of the pertinent specialist field, as in cardiovascular technologist, industrial technologist, etc. These specialist practitioners’ two-word titles tend to be etymologically preceded by the equivalent two-word names of their specialist fields.

Translations

Further reading

  • technologist on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

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