engross vs plunge what difference

what is difference between engross and plunge

English

Etymology

From Middle English engrossen, from Anglo-Norman engrosser (to gather in large quantities, draft something in final form); partly from the phrase en gros (in bulk, in quantity, at wholesale), from en- + gros; and partly from Medieval Latin ingrossō (thicken, write something large and in bold lettering, v.), from in- + grossus (great, big, thick), from Old High German grōz (big, thick, coarse), from Proto-West Germanic *graut, from Proto-Germanic *grautaz (large, great, thick, coarse grained, unrefined), from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (to fell, put down, fall in). More at in-, gross.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪnˈɡɹəʊs/, /ɪŋˈɡɹəʊs/, /ɛnˈɡɹəʊs/, /ɛŋˈɡɹəʊs/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈɡɹəʊs/, /ɪŋˈɡɹəʊs/, /ɛnˈɡɹoʊs/, /ɛŋˈɡɹoʊs/
  • Rhymes: -əʊs

Verb

engross (third-person singular simple present engrosses, present participle engrossing, simple past and past participle engrossed)

  1. (transitive, now law) To write (a document) in large, aesthetic, and legible lettering; to make a finalized copy of.
    Coordinate term: longhand
    • 1846, Thomas De Quincey, “On Christianity, as an Organ of Political Movement”, in Tait’s Edinburgh Magazine:
      laws that may be engrossed upon a finger nail
  2. (transitive, business, obsolete) To buy up wholesale, especially to buy the whole supply of (a commodity etc.).
    Synonym: corner the market
  3. (transitive) To monopolize; to concentrate (something) in the single possession of someone, especially unfairly.
    • The Coral Islands are principally visited by the pearl-shell fishermen, who arrive in small schooners, carrying not more than five or six men. For a long while the business was engrossed by Merenhout, the French Consul at Tahiti, but a Dutchman by birth, who, in one year, is said to have sent to France fifty thousand dollars’ worth of shells.
  4. (transitive) To completely engage the attention of.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To thicken; to condense.
    Synonyms: inspissate; see also Thesaurus:thicken
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To make gross, thick, or large; to thicken; to increase in bulk or quantity.
  7. (obsolete) To amass.
    Synonyms: amound, hoard; see also Thesaurus:amass

Derived terms

  • engrossing

Related terms

  • gross

Translations

Further reading

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “engross”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • engrossing (law) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Gersons, Gonsers, Rogness, Songers, grossen, songers


English

Etymology

From Middle English plungen, ploungen, Anglo-Norman plungier, from Old French plongier, (Modern French plonger), from unattested Late Latin frequentative *plumbicō (to throw a leaded line), from plumbum (lead). Compare plumb, plounce.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plʌndʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌndʒ

Verb

plunge (third-person singular simple present plunges, present participle plunging, simple past and past participle plunged)

  1. (transitive) To thrust into liquid, or into any penetrable substance; to immerse.
  2. (figuratively, transitive) To cast, stab or throw into some thing, state, condition or action.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To baptize by immersion.
  4. (intransitive) To dive, leap or rush (into water or some liquid); to submerge oneself.
  5. (figuratively, intransitive) To fall or rush headlong into some thing, action, state or condition.
  6. (intransitive) To pitch or throw oneself headlong or violently forward, as a horse does.
    • 1654, Joseph Hall, Select Thoughts, or Choice Helps for a Pious Spirit
      some wild colt, which [] flings and plunges
  7. (intransitive, slang) To bet heavily and recklessly; to risk large sums in gambling.
  8. (intransitive, obsolete) To entangle or embarrass (mostly used in past participle).
  9. (intransitive, obsolete) To overwhelm, overpower.
Derived terms
  • plunge in, plunge into
Translations

Noun

plunge (plural plunges)

  1. the act of plunging or submerging
  2. a dive, leap, rush, or pitch into (into water)
  3. (dated) A swimming pool
  4. (figuratively) the act of pitching or throwing oneself headlong or violently forward, like an unruly horse
  5. (slang) heavy and reckless betting in horse racing; hazardous speculation
  6. (obsolete) an immersion in difficulty, embarrassment, or distress; the condition of being surrounded or overwhelmed; a strait; difficulty

Translations

References

  • plunge in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “plunge”, in OED Online ⁠, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

Anagrams

  • pungle

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