enjoy vs relish what difference

what is difference between enjoy and relish

English

Alternative forms

  • enioy (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English enjoyen, from Old French enjoier, anjoier, enjoer (to give joy, receive with joy, rejoice), equivalent to en- +‎ joy.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈd͡ʒɔɪ/, /ənˈd͡ʒɔɪ/, /ɛnˈd͡ʒɔɪ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪ
  • Hyphenation: en‧joy

Verb

enjoy (third-person singular simple present enjoys, present participle enjoying, simple past and past participle enjoyed)

  1. (transitive) To receive pleasure or satisfaction from something.
  2. (transitive) To have the use or benefit of something.
    • that the children of Israel may enjoy every man the inheritance of his fathers
  3. (intransitive, India) To be satisfied or receive pleasure.
  4. (transitive) To have sexual intercourse with.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

  • (receive pleasure or satisfaction): appreciate, delight in, rejoice, relish
  • (have sexual intercourse with): coitize, go to bed with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with

Derived terms

  • enjoyable
  • enjoyment
  • to enjoy oneself

Translations

Anagrams

  • joyen, joyne


English

Etymology

Alteration of reles (scent, taste, aftertaste), from Old French relais, reles (something remaining, that which is left behind), from relaisser (to leave behind).

Alternative forms

  • rellish (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛ.lɪʃ/

Noun

relish (countable and uncountable, plural relishes)

  1. A pleasant taste
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 12.
      A Laplander or Negro has no notion of the relish of wine.
  2. enjoyment; pleasure.
  3. A quality or characteristic tinge.
  4. (followed by “for”) A taste (for); liking (of); fondness.
    • 1849, Thomas Macaulay, History of England, Chapter 11:
      One of the first acts which he was under the necessity of performing must have been painful to a man of so generous a nature, and of so keen a relish for whatever was excellent in arts and letters.
    • 1785, William Cowper, letter to the Rev. John Newton (dated December 10, 1785)
      I have a relish for moderate praise, because it bids fair to be judicious.
  5. A cooked or pickled sauce, usually made with vegetables or fruits, generally used as a condiment.
  6. In a wooden frame, the projection or shoulder at the side of, or around, a tenon, on a tenoned piece.
  7. Something that is greatly liked or savoured.

Hyponyms

  • See also Thesaurus:seasoning

Derived terms

  • India relish

Translations

Verb

relish (third-person singular simple present relishes, present participle relishing, simple past and past participle relished)

  1. (transitive) To taste or eat with pleasure, to like the flavor of [from 16th c.]
  2. (transitive) to take great pleasure in.
    He relishes their time together.
    I don’t relish the idea of going out tonight.
    • Now I begin to relish thy advice.
    • 1706, Francis Atterbury, A sermon preached at the Guild-Hall Chapel, September 28, 1706
      He knows how to prize his advantages, and to relish the honours which he enjoys.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To taste; to have a specified taste or flavour. [16th-19th c.]
    • Had I been the finder-out of this secret, it would not have relish’d among my other discredits.
    • 1695, John Woodward, An essay toward a natural history of the earth
      A theory, which, how much soever it may relish of wit and invention, hath no foundation in nature.
  4. (transitive) To give a taste to; to cause to taste nice, to make appetizing. [from 16th c.]
  5. (obsolete, intransitive) To give pleasure.

Synonyms

(take pleasure in): : appreciate, delight in, enjoy, like, revel in

Derived terms

  • disrelish
  • relishable
  • relisher

Translations

References

  • relish in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Hilers, Riehls, Rishel, hirsel

French

Etymology

From English relish.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁe.liʃ/, /ʁɛ.liʃ/

Noun

relish f (uncountable)

  1. relish (pickled sauce)

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