enjoy vs revel what difference

what is difference between enjoy and revel

English

Alternative forms

  • enioy (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English enjoyen, from Old French enjoier, anjoier, enjoer (to give joy, receive with joy, rejoice), equivalent to en- +‎ joy.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈd͡ʒɔɪ/, /ənˈd͡ʒɔɪ/, /ɛnˈd͡ʒɔɪ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪ
  • Hyphenation: en‧joy

Verb

enjoy (third-person singular simple present enjoys, present participle enjoying, simple past and past participle enjoyed)

  1. (transitive) To receive pleasure or satisfaction from something.
  2. (transitive) To have the use or benefit of something.
    • that the children of Israel may enjoy every man the inheritance of his fathers
  3. (intransitive, India) To be satisfied or receive pleasure.
  4. (transitive) To have sexual intercourse with.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Milton to this entry?)

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

  • (receive pleasure or satisfaction): appreciate, delight in, rejoice, relish
  • (have sexual intercourse with): coitize, go to bed with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with

Derived terms

  • enjoyable
  • enjoyment
  • to enjoy oneself

Translations

Anagrams

  • joyen, joyne


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English revelen, from Old French revel, from reveler (to be disorderly, to make merry), from Latin rebello (to rebel). Doublet of rebel.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: rĕvʹ-əl, IPA(key): /ˈɹɛv.əl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛvəl

Noun

revel (plural revels)

  1. An instance of merrymaking; a celebration.
    • “I ought to arise and go forth with timbrels and with dances; but, do you know, I am not inclined to revels? There has been a little—just a very little bit too much festivity so far …. Not that I don’t adore dinners and gossip and dances; not that I do not love to pervade bright and glittering places. []
  2. A kind of dance.
  3. A wake for the dead.
Derived terms
  • revelry
Translations

Verb

revel (third-person singular simple present revels, present participle revelling or reveling, simple past and past participle revelled or reveled)

  1. To make merry; to have a happy, lively time.
    • 1610, Alexander Cooke, Pope Joane, in William Oldys, editor, The Harleian Miscellany: or, A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as well in Manuscript as in Print, Found in the Late Earl of Oxford’s Library: Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes: With a Table of the Contents, and an Alphabetical Index, volume IV, London: Printed for T[homas] Osborne, in Gray’s-Inn, 1744, OCLC 5325177; republished as John Maltham, editor, The Harleian Miscellany; or, A Collection of Scarce, Curious, and Entertaining Pamphlets and Tracts, as well in Manuscript as in Print, Found in the Late Earl of Oxford’s Library, Interspersed with Historical, Political, and Critical Notes, volume IV, London: Printed for R. Dutton, 1808–1811, OCLC 30776079, page 95:
      If there bee any lasie fellow, any that cannot away with worke, any that would wallow in pleasures, hee is hastie to be priested. And when hee is made one, and has gotten a benefice, he consorts with his neighbour priests, who are altogether given to pleasures; and then both hee, and they, live, not like Christians, but like epicures; drinking, eating, feasting, and revelling, till the cow come home, as the saying is.
  2. To take delight (in something).
    • 1997, The Art of Practicing, a Guide to Making Music from the Heart
      Slowing down doesn’t have to feel like holding back. It can be an opportunity to revel in sounds and sensations, to not be so concerned about where we are going but to enjoy the moment and become comfortable where we are.
Synonyms
  • (make merry): carouse, celebrate
Derived terms
  • reveller/reveler
Translations

Etymology 2

From Latin revellere; re- + vellere (to pluck, pull).

Verb

revel (third-person singular simple present revels, present participle revelling, simple past and past participle revelled)

  1. (obsolete) To draw back; to retract.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Harvey to this entry?)

Noun

revel (plural revels)

  1. (architecture) Alternative form of reveal

Anagrams

  • Lever, elver, lever

Breton

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Alternative forms

  • reizhel

Adjective

revel

  1. sexual

References

  • “revel” in TermOfis, Office Public de la Langue Bretonne

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French revel, from reveler.

Alternative forms

  • revell, revelle, rewle

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛvəl/

Noun

revel (plural reveles)

  1. Joyfulness, entertainment, celebration, revelling.
  2. A specific instance of revelling or joyfulness.
  3. (rare, Late Middle English) Chaos, disorder.
Related terms
  • revelen
  • revelour
  • revelyng
Descendants
  • English: revel
References
  • “revel, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-16.

Etymology 2

Verb

revel

  1. Alternative form of revelen (to revel)

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