enlarge vs magnify what difference

what is difference between enlarge and magnify

English

Etymology

From Middle English enlargen, from Old French enlargier, enlargir.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪnˈlɑːd͡ʒ/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪnˈlɑɹd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)dʒ

Verb

enlarge (third-person singular simple present enlarges, present participle enlarging, simple past and past participle enlarged)

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

  1. (transitive) To make (something) larger.
  2. (intransitive) To grow larger.
  3. (transitive) To increase the capacity of; to expand; to give free scope or greater scope to; also, to dilate, as with joy, affection, etc.
    • O ye Corinthians, our [] heart is enlarged.
  4. (intransitive) To speak or write at length upon or on (some subject); expand; elaborate
    • 1664, Samuel Butler, Hudibras 2.2.68:
      I shall enlarge upon the Point.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 167:
      He began to enlarge on the nature of the ground.
  5. (archaic) To release; to set at large.
    • 1580, Philip Sidney, Arcadia 329:
      Like a Lionesse lately enlarged.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.8:
      Finding no meanes how I might us enlarge, / But if that Dwarfe I could with me convay, / I lightly snatcht him up and with me bore away.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Contentment (sermon)
      It will enlarge us from all restraints.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, Act II Scene II:
      Uncle of Exeter, enlarge the man committed yesterday, that rail’d against our person. We consider it was excess of wine that set him on.
    • 1926, T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, New York: Anchor (1991), p. 167:
      In hospital he gave his parole, and was enlarged after paying for the torn blanket.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      In the morning, said Mr. Case, as soon as Mr. Gorman, or Mr. Nolan arrives, you will be let out, and free to come and go, as you please. Watt replied that that would indeed be something to look forward to, and a comfort to him during the night, the prospect of being enlarged, in the morning, by Mr. Gorman, or Mr. Nolan, and made free to come and go, as he listed.
  6. (nautical) To get more astern or parallel with the vessel’s course; to draw aft; said of the wind.
  7. (law) To extend the time allowed for compliance with (an order or rule).
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Abbott to this entry?)

Synonyms

  • (make larger, expand): embiggen, enlargen, largen, greaten
  • (speak or write at length): dilate, expatiate

Related terms

  • magnify
  • supersize

Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “enlarge”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Anagrams

  • General, general, gleaner, reangle


English

Alternative forms

  • magnifie (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle French magnifier, from Latin magnificāre, from magnificus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmaɡnɪfaɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmæɡnɪfaɪ/

Verb

magnify (third-person singular simple present magnifies, present participle magnifying, simple past and past participle magnified)

  1. (transitive) To praise, glorify (someone or something, especially God). [from 14th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts X:
      For they herde them speake with tonges, and magnify God.
    • 1644, John Milton, Aeropagitica:
      For he who freely magnifies what hath been nobly done, and fears not to declare as freely what might be done better, gives ye the best cov’nant of his fidelity […].
  2. (transitive) To make (something) larger or more important. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive) To make (someone or something) appear greater or more important than it is; to intensify, exaggerate. [from 17th c.]
  4. (transitive) To make (something) appear larger by means of a lens, magnifying glass, telescope etc. [from 17th c.]
  5. (intransitive, slang, obsolete) To have effect; to be of importance or significance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spectator to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • magnifier
  • magnifying glass
  • magnification

Related terms

  • minify (opposite)

Translations


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial