enlighten vs irradiate what difference

what is difference between enlighten and irradiate

English

Etymology

Formerly also inlighten, from Middle English enlightenen, inlightnen, a hybrid formed from inlighten (to enlighten, illuminate), from Old English inlīhtan, onlīhtan, enlīhten (to enlighten, illuminate, give light to, give sight to) and lightnen (to enlighten, illuminate) (equivalent to light +‎ -en). Cognate with Dutch inlichten (to enlighten, inform), Old High German inliuhten (to enlighten, illuminate), Gothic ???????????????????????????????????????? (inliuhtjan, to enlighten, illuminate). More at inlight, -en.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈlaɪtən/, /ənˈlaɪtən/, /ɛnˈlaɪtən/
  • Rhymes: -aɪtən
  • Hyphenation: en‧light‧en

Verb

enlighten (third-person singular simple present enlightens, present participle enlightening, simple past and past participle enlightened)

  1. (transitive) To supply with light.
    Synonyms: illumine, illuminate; see also Thesaurus:illuminate
    Antonym: endarken
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make something clear to (someone); to give knowledge or understanding to.
    Synonyms: apprise, notify, inform

Translations



English

Etymology

Latin irradiatus

Pronunciation

  • (verb) IPA(key): /ɪˈɹeɪdieɪt/
  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ɪˈɹeɪdiət/

Verb

irradiate (third-person singular simple present irradiates, present participle irradiating, simple past and past participle irradiated)

  1. (transitive, literary, poetic) To illuminate; to brighten; to shine light on.
    • c. late 18th century Sir W. Jones, Hymn to Lachsmi
      Thy smile irradiates yon blue fields.
  2. (transitive, literary, poetic) To enlighten intellectually; to illuminate.
    • a. 1740 Bishop George Bull, A discourse concerning the spirit of God in the faithful
      And indeed we ought, in these happy intervals, when our understandings are thus irradiated and enlightened, to make a judgment of the state and condition of our souls in the sight of God []
  3. (transitive, literary, poetic) To animate by heat or light.
    • a. 1676 (written, first published in 1817) , Matthew Hale, A letter of advice to his grandchildren, Matthew, Gabriel, Anne, Mary, and Frances Hale.
      you may subdue and conquer the temperament of your nature, to do all things well-pleasing to him, and that may irradiate and strengthen your souls
  4. (transitive, literary, poetic) To radiate, shed, or diffuse.
  5. (transitive, literary, poetic) To decorate with shining ornaments.
  6. (intransitive) To emit rays; to shine.
  7. (sciences) To apply radiation to.
    1. (medicine) To treat (a tumour or cancerous growth) with radiation.
    2. (transitive) To treat (food) with ionizing radiation in order to destroy bacteria.

Translations

Adjective

irradiate

  1. Illuminated; irradiated; made brilliant or splendid.
    • 1801, Robert Southey, Thalaba the Destroyer:
      The co-existent Flame
      Knew the Destroyer; it encircled him,
      Roll’d up his robe, and gathered round his head,
      Condensing to intenser splendour there,
      His Crown of Glory, and his Light of Life,
      Hovered the irradiate wreath.

Related terms

  • irradiance
  • irradiancy
  • irradiant
  • irradiation
  • irradiative

References

  • irradiate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • irradiate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Italian

Verb

irradiate

  1. inflection of irradiare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of irradiato

Anagrams

  • arridiate, idraterai, reidratai, riardiate

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