ensue vs result what difference

what is difference between ensue and result

English

Etymology

From Old French ensu- , stem of some conjugated forms of ensivre (follow close upon, come afterward) (French ensuivre), from Latin īnsequere, from īnsequi (to pursue, follow, follow after; come next), from in- (upon) (see in-) + sequi (follow) (see sequel).

Pronunciation

  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /ɛnˈsjʉː/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪnˈsjuː/, IPA(key): /ɪnˈʃuː/, IPA(key): /ɛnˈsjuː/, IPA(key): /ɛnˈʃuː/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪnˈsuː/
  • Rhymes: -uː

Verb

ensue (third-person singular simple present ensues, present participle ensuing, simple past and past participle ensued)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To follow (a leader, inclination etc.). [15th-17th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.ii:
      to ripenesse of mans state they grew: / Then shewing forth signes of their fathers blood, / They loued armes, and knighthood did ensew, / Seeking aduentures […].
    • 1606, Justine, G. W. (translator), The Historie of Justine
      To ensue his example in doynge the like mischiefe.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To follow (in time), to be subsequent to. [15th-17th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, III.11:
      Oh how many changes are like to ensue this reformation!
  3. (intransitive) To occur afterwards, as a result or effect. [from 16th c.]
    Give three freshmen six bottles of wine, and hilarity will ensue.

Synonyms

  • (to follow): carry out, follow, pursue
  • (to be subsequent to): come after, follow; see also Thesaurus:succeed
  • (to occur afterwards): arise, follow

Related terms

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • seuen, unsee


English

Etymology

Recorded since 1432 as Middle English resulten, from Medieval Latin resultare, in Classical Latin “to spring forward, rebound”, the frequentative of the past participle of resilio (to rebound), from re- (back) + salio (to jump, leap).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈzʌlt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌlt
  • Hyphenation: re‧sult

Verb

result (third-person singular simple present results, present participle resulting, simple past and past participle resulted) (intransitive)

  1. To proceed, spring up or rise, as a consequence, from facts, arguments, premises, combination of circumstances, consultation, thought or endeavor.
    • a. 1694, John Tillotson, The Advantages of Religion to particular Persons
      Pleasure and peace do naturally result from a holy and good life.
  2. (intransitive, followed by “in”) To have as a consequence; to lead to; to bring about
  3. (law) To return to the proprietor (or heirs) after a reversion.
  4. (obsolete) To leap back; to rebound.

Synonyms

  • (to proceed, spring, or rise, as a consequence): follow, arise

Related terms

  • resultant
  • resile
  • resilient
  • resilience

Translations

Noun

result (plural results)

  1. That which results; the conclusion or end to which any course or condition of things leads, or which is obtained by any process or operation; consequence or effect.
  2. The final product, beneficial or tangible effect(s) achieved by effort.
  3. The decision or determination of a council or deliberative assembly; a resolve; a decree.
  4. (obsolete) A flying back; resilience.
  5. (sports) The final score in a game.
  6. (by extension) A positive or favourable outcome for someone.

Hyponyms

  • (that which results): primitive, sum, difference, product (mathematics)

Derived terms

Translations

Interjection

result

  1. (Britain) An exclamation of joy following a favorable outcome.
    • 2010 April 10, Amy Pond, in The Beast Below (series 5, episode 2), written by Steven Moffat:
      (picking a lock) I wonder what I did…
      (the lock opens) Hey hey, result!

Anagrams

  • Luster, Ulster, lurest, luster, lustre, luters, rulest, rustle, sutler, truels, ulster

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