entail vs implicate what difference

what is difference between entail and implicate

English

Alternative forms

  • intail (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnˈteɪl/, /ɪnˈteɪl/, /ənˈteɪl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪl

Etymology 1

From Middle English entaillen, from Old French entaillier, entailler (to notch, literally to cut in); from prefix en- + tailler (to cut), from Late Latin taliare, from Latin talea. Compare late Latin feudum talliatum (a fee entailed, i.e., curtailed or limited).

Verb

entail (third-person singular simple present entails, present participle entailing, simple past and past participle entailed)

  1. (transitive) To imply or require.
    This activity will entail careful attention to detail.
  2. (transitive) To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain line of descendants; — said especially of an estate; to bestow as a heritage.
    • 1754-1762, David Hume, The History of England
      Allowing them to entail their estates.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To appoint hereditary possessor.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To cut or carve in an ornamental way.
Derived terms
  • entailment
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English entaille (carving), from Old French entaille (incision), from the verb entailler. See above.

Noun

entail (plural entails)

  1. That which is entailed. Hence:
    1. An estate in fee entailed, or limited in descent to a particular class of issue.
    2. The rule by which the descent is fixed.
    • 1754-1762, David Hume, The History of England
      A power of breaking the ancient entails, and of alienating their estates.
  2. (obsolete) Delicately carved ornamental work; intaglio.
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Latine, Ta-lien, Talien


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin implicatus < implico (entangle, involve), from plico (fold). Doublet of imply and employ.

Pronunciation

  • (verb) IPA(key): /ˈɪmplɪkeɪt/
  • (noun) IPA(key): /ˈɪmplɪkət/

Verb

implicate (third-person singular simple present implicates, present participle implicating, simple past and past participle implicated)

  1. (transitive, with “in”) To show to be connected or involved in an unfavorable or criminal way.
  2. To imply, to have as a necessary consequence or accompaniment.
  3. (pragmatics) To imply without entailing; to have as an implicature.
  4. (archaic) To fold or twist together, intertwine, interlace, entangle, entwine.

Related terms

  • implication
  • implicative
  • implicature
  • implicit
  • implicitness
  • imply

Translations

Noun

implicate (plural implicates)

  1. (philosophy) The thing implied.

See also

  • (connect with a crime): grass, inform, squeal

Anagrams

  • ampelitic

Italian

Verb

implicate

  1. inflection of implicare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
    3. feminine plural past participle

Latin

Participle

implicāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of implicātus

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