enter vs participate what difference

what is difference between enter and participate

English

Alternative forms

  • entre (archaic, before circa 1700)

Etymology

From Middle English entren, from Old French entrer, from Latin intrō (enter, verb), from intrā (inside). Has been spelled as “enter” for several centuries even in the United Kingdom, although British English and the English of many Commonwealth Countries (e.g. Australia, Canada) retain the “re” ending for many words such as centre, fibre, spectre, theatre, calibre, sombre, lustre, and litre.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛntə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɛntɚ/, [ˈɛɾ̃ɚ]
    • (pinpen merger) IPA(key): [ˈɪɾ̃ɚ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛntə(r)
  • Homophone: inner (pin-pen merger)
  • Hyphenation: en‧ter

Verb

enter (third-person singular simple present enters, present participle entering, simple past and past participle entered)

  1. (intransitive) To go or come into an enclosed or partially enclosed space.
    • Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God.
    • In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass. [] Strangers might enter the room, but they were made to feel that they were there on sufferance: they were received with distance and suspicion.
  2. (transitive) To cause to go (into), or to be received (into); to put in; to insert; to cause to be admitted.
  3. (figuratively) To go or come into (a state or profession).
  4. (transitive) To type (something) into a computer; to input.
  5. (transitive) To record (something) in an account, ledger, etc.
  6. (intransitive, law) To become a party to an agreement, treaty, etc.
    • I am pleased to notify the Congress of my intent to enter into a Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with the Government of Singapore.
  7. (law, intransitive) To become effective; to come into effect.
  8. (law) To go into or upon, as lands, and take actual possession of them.
  9. (transitive, law) To place in regular form before the court, usually in writing; to put upon record in proper from and order.
    to enter a writ, appearance, rule, or judgment
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  10. to make report of (a vessel or its cargo) at the custom house; to submit a statement of (imported goods), with the original invoices, to the proper customs officer for estimating the duties. See entry.
  11. (transitive, US, dated, historical) To file, or register with the land office, the required particulars concerning (a quantity of public land) in order to entitle a person to a right of preemption.
  12. to deposit for copyright the title or description of (a book, picture, map, etc.).
    entered according to act of Congress
  13. (transitive, obsolete) To initiate; to introduce favourably.
    • This sword but shown to Caesar, with this tidings, / Shall enter me with him.

Inflection

Synonyms

  • go in, ingo
  • come in

Antonyms

  • (intransitive) exit

Derived terms

  • entrance
  • breaking and entering
  • enter on the boards

Translations

Noun

enter (plural enters)

  1. (computing) Alternative spelling of Enter (the computer key)
  2. (computing) Alternative spelling of Enter (a stroke of the computer key)

Translations

Anagrams

  • entre, rente, terne, treen

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan, inherited from Latin integer, integrum. Compare Occitan entièr, French entier, Spanish entero. Doublet of íntegre, a later borrowing.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /ənˈte/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ənˈter/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /enˈteɾ/

Adjective

enter (feminine entera, masculine plural enters, feminine plural enteres)

  1. entire, whole, complete
    Synonym: sencer

Derived terms

  • enterament
  • nombre enter

Noun

enter m (plural enters)

  1. whole number, integer
    Synonyms: nombre enter, nombre sencer
  2. a complete lottery ticket (made up of ten dècims)

Related terms

  • entregar

Further reading

  • “enter” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈent(ː)er/, [ˈe̞n̪t̪(ː)e̞r]
  • Rhymes: -enter
  • Syllabification: en‧ter

Noun

enter

  1. Enter (computer key)

Declension


French

Etymology

From a Vulgar Latin *imptāre, contraction of *imputō, imputāre (I graft) (unrelated to imputō (I reckon, attribute)), from inpotus (attested in Salic Law), from Ancient Greek ἔμφυτος (émphutos, planted). The Greek word may have actually reached Gaul through traders at the Mediterranean coastal colonies before the Roman conquest.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.te/

Verb

enter

  1. (agriculture) to graft
  2. to implant

Conjugation

Further reading

  • “enter” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • entre, entré
  • rente, renté
  • terne

Gaulish

Alternative forms

  • entar

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *enter (between), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁enter (between). Cognates include Celtiberian entara (between), Old Irish eter (between) (Irish idir (between, both)), Latin inter (between), Sanskrit अन्तर् (antár, between, within, into), Oscan ???????????????????? (anter, between), and Old High German untar (between).

Preposition

enter

  1. between, among

References

  • Xavier Delamarre, Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise: Une approche linguistique du vieux-celtique continental, published 2003, →ISBN, page 163.
  • Ranko Matasović, Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic, published 2009, →ISBN, page 117.

German

Verb

enter

  1. inflection of entern:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative

Polish

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈɛn.tɛr/

Noun

enter m inan

  1. (computing) Enter (key on a computer keyboard)

Declension



English

Etymology

From the participle stem of Latin participare (to take part in, share in, give part in, impart), from particeps (taking part in, sharing in), from pars (part) + capiō (to take); see part and capable.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /pɑːˈtɪsɪpeɪt/
  • (General American) enPR: pär-tĭsʹĭ-pāt, IPA(key): /pɑɹˈtɪsɪpeɪt/

Verb

participate (third-person singular simple present participates, present participle participating, simple past and past participle participated)

  1. (intransitive) To join in, to take part, to involve oneself (in something). [from 16th c.]
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To share, share in (something). [16th-19th c.]
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, Act V, Scene 1,[2]
      A spirit I am indeed;
      But am in that dimension grossly clad
      Which from the womb I did participate.
    • 1638, Thomas Herbert, Some Yeares Travels Into Africa & Asia the Great, London: Jacob Blome and Richard Bishop, Book I, p. 52,[3]
      [The Persees] are tollerated all sorts of meat; but (in obedience to the Mahomitan and Bannyan ’mongst whom they live) refraine Beefe and Hog flesh: they seldome feed together, lest they might participate one anothers impurity: each has his owne cup […].
    • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, Letter 4, p. 109,[4]
      In what country on the globe is it, that in the class of mankind doomed to labour, we shall not find tribes, the women of which participate the toils of the men?
  3. (obsolete) To share (something) with others; to transfer (something) to or unto others. [16th-18th c.]
    • 1661, Thomas Salusbury, Galilaeus Galilaeus Lyncaeus, His Systeme of the World, Second Dialogue, in Mathematical Collections and Translations, London, p. 105,[5]
      Make the Earth […] turn round its own axis in twenty four hours, and towards the same point with all the other Spheres; and without participating this same motion to any other Planet or Star, all shall have their risings, settings, and in a word, all their other appearances.

Related terms

  • participant
  • participation
  • participative
  • participator
  • participatory
  • participial
  • participle

Translations

Adjective

participate (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Acting in common; participating.
    • 1608, William Shakespeare, The Tragedy of Coriolanus, I. i. 101:
      And, mutually participate, did minister / Unto the appetite and affection common / Of the whole body.

Further reading

  • participate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • participate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “participate”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Latin

Verb

participāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of participō

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