enterprise vs initiative what difference

what is difference between enterprise and initiative

English

Alternative forms

  • enterprize (chiefly archaic)
  • entreprise (chiefly archaic)

Etymology

From Old French via Middle English and Middle French entreprise, feminine past participle of entreprendre (to undertake), from entre (in between) + prendre (to take), from Latin inter + prehendō, see prehensile.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛntɚˌpɹaɪz/
  • Hyphenation: en‧ter‧prise

Noun

enterprise (countable and uncountable, plural enterprises)

  1. A company, business, organization, or other purposeful endeavor.
    The government sponsored enterprises (GSEs) are a group of financial services corporations which have been created by the United States Congress.
    A micro-enterprise is defined as a business having 5 or fewer employees and a low seed capital.
  2. An undertaking, venture, or project, especially a daring and courageous one.
    Biosphere 2 was a scientific enterprise aimed at the exploration of the complex web of interactions within life systems.
  3. (uncountable) A willingness to undertake new or risky projects; energy and initiative.
    He has shown great enterprise throughout his early career.
    • 1954, Philip Larkin, Continuing to Live
      This loss of interest, hair, and enterprise — / Ah, if the game were poker, yes, / You might discard them, draw a full house! / But it’s chess.
  4. (uncountable) Active participation in projects. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms

  • initiative

Derived terms

  • enterprising
  • commercial enterprise
  • scientific enterprise

Translations

Verb

enterprise (third-person singular simple present enterprises, present participle enterprising, simple past and past participle enterprised)

  1. (intransitive) To undertake an enterprise, or something hazardous or difficult.
    • Charles Mordaunt Earl of Peterborow [] , with only 280 horse and 950 foot , enterprised and accomplished the Conquest of Valentia
  2. (transitive) To undertake; to begin and attempt to perform; to venture upon.
    • 1670, John Dryden, The Conquest of Granada
      The business must be enterprised this night.
    • c. 1680, Thomas Otway, letter to Elizabeth Barry
      What would I not renounce or enterprise for you!
  3. (transitive) To treat with hospitality; to entertain.

References

  • enterprise at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • enterprise in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • enterprise in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • entreprise


English

Etymology

From French initiative, from Medieval Latin *initiativus (serving to initiate), from Late Latin initiare (to begin, Latin initiate), from Latin initium (beginning), from ineo (enter, begin).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈnɪʃətɪv/
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃətɪv

Adjective

initiative (not comparable)

  1. Serving to initiate; inceptive; initiatory; introductory; preliminary.
  2. In which voter initiatives can be brought to the ballot.
    • a. 2008, John G. Matsusaka, “Direct Democracy and the Executive Branch”, in, 2008, Shaun Bowler and Amihai Glazer, editors, Direct Democracy’s Impact on American Political Institutions, Palgrave Macmillan, →ISBN, page 122 [1]:
      The second row shows that initiative states fill more constitutional offices by election than noninitiative states, and the difference is statistically significant after controlling for region and population.

Antonyms

  • noninitiative

Translations

Noun

initiative (countable and uncountable, plural initiatives)

  1. A beginning; a first move.
  2. A new development; a fresh approach to something; a new way of dealing with a problem.
  3. The ability to act first or on one’s own.
  4. An issue to be voted on, brought to the ballot by a sufficient number of signatures from among the voting public.

Synonyms

  • (issue to be voted on): direct initiative

Derived terms

  • direct initiative

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • initiative in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • initiative in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • initiative at OneLook Dictionary Search

French

Etymology

From *Medieval Latin initiativus (serving to initiate), from Late Latin initiare (to begin, Latin initiate), from Latin initium (beginning), from ineo (enter, begin).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /i.ni.sja.tiv/

Noun

initiative f (plural initiatives)

  1. initiative
    • Prendre l’initiative.

Derived terms

  • syndicat d’initiative

Further reading

  • “initiative” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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