enthrone vs throne what difference

what is difference between enthrone and throne

English

Etymology

From en- +‎ throne; compare earlier enthronize, inthronize.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -əʊn

Verb

enthrone (third-person singular simple present enthrones, present participle enthroning, simple past and past participle enthroned)

  1. (transitive) To put on the throne in a formal installation ceremony called enthronement, equivalent to (and often combined with) coronation and/or other ceremonies of investiture
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To help a candidate to the succession of a monarchy (as a kingmaker does), or by extension in any other major organisation.

Antonyms

  • dethrone

Related terms

  • enskin
  • enstool

Translations

Further reading

  • enthrone on Wikipedia.Wikipedia


English

Etymology

From Middle English trone, from Old French trone, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair, throne).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): [θɹəʊn]
  • (US) IPA(key): [θɹoʊn]
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): [tɹoʊn]
  • Rhymes: -əʊn
  • Homophone: thrown

Noun

throne (plural thrones)

  1. An impressive seat used by a monarch, often on a raised dais in a throne room and reserved for formal occasions.
    Queen Victoria sat upon the throne of England for 63 years.
  2. (figuratively) Leadership, particularly the position of a monarch.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Genesis, 41:40:
      Thou shalt be ouer my house, and according vnto thy word shall all my people be ruled: only in the throne will I be greater then thou.
  3. The seat of a bishop in the cathedral-church of his diocese; also, the seat of a pope.
  4. (humorous) Other seats, particularly:
    1. (euphemistic) A seat used for urination or defecation, such as a chamber pot, toilet, or the seat of an outhouse.
      • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Things
        “If she has intestinal flu, you probably called while she was on the throne and she didn’t want to admit it,” Alan said dryly.
    2. (music) A kind of stool used by drummers.
  5. (Christianity) A member of an order of angels ranked above dominions and below cherubim.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Epistle of Paul to the Colossians, 1:16:
      For by him were all things created that are in heauen, and that are in earth, visible and inuisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him.

Synonyms

  • (seat used for urination and defecation): See Thesaurus:chamber pot, Thesaurus:toilet, and Thesaurus:bathroom

Hypernyms

  • (furniture): seat
  • (order of angels): angel

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

throne (third-person singular simple present thrones, present participle throning, simple past and past participle throned)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To place on a royal seat; to enthrone.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To place in an elevated position; to give sovereignty or dominion to; to exalt.
  3. (intransitive, archaic) To be in, or sit upon, a throne; to be placed as if upon a throne.

Translations

See also

  • ophan

Anagrams

  • ‘nother, Hornet, Rhoten, Theron, Thoren, Thorne, enhort, hornet, nother, other’n

German

Verb

throne

  1. inflection of thronen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Latin

Noun

throne

  1. vocative singular of thronus

Middle English

Noun

throne

  1. Alternative form of trone (throne)

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • trosne

Etymology

From Old French trone, from Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos). The h was added back to reflect the Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair, throne).

Noun

throne m (plural thrones)

  1. throne

Descendants

  • French: trône

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