entire vs total what difference

what is difference between entire and total

English

Alternative forms

  • intire (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English entere, enter, borrowed from Anglo-Norman entier, from Latin integrum, accusative of integer, from in- (not) + tangō (touch). Doublet of integer.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪnˈtaɪə/, /ənˈtaɪə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪnˈtaɪɚ/, /ənˈtaɪɚ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Adjective

entire (not comparable)

  1. (sometimes postpositive) Whole; complete.
  2. (botany) Having a smooth margin without any indentation.
  3. (botany) Consisting of a single piece, as a corolla.
  4. (complex analysis, of a complex function) Complex-differentiable on all of ℂ.
  5. (of a male animal) Not gelded.
  6. morally whole; pure; sheer
  7. Internal; interior.

Derived terms

  • entirety

Related terms

  • integrity
  • integrate

Translations

Noun

entire (countable and uncountable, plural entires)

  1. (now rare) The whole of something; the entirety.
    • 1876, WE Gladstone, Homeric Synchronism:
      In the entire of the Poems we never hear of a merchant ship of the Greeks.
    • 1924, EM Forster, A Passage to India, Penguin 2005, p. 19:
      ‘Then is the City Magistrate the entire of your family now?’
  2. An uncastrated horse; a stallion.
    • 2005, James Meek, The People’s Act of Love (Canongate 2006, p. 124)
      He asked why Hijaz was an entire. You know what an entire is, do you not, Anna? A stallion which has not been castrated.
  3. (philately) A complete envelope with stamps and all official markings: (prior to the use of envelopes) a page folded and posted.
  4. Porter or stout as delivered from the brewery.

Translations

Anagrams

  • entier, in-tree, nerite, triene


English

Alternative forms

  • totall (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English total, from Old French total, from Medieval Latin tōtālis, from tōtus (all, whole, entire), of unknown origin. Perhaps related to Oscan ???????????????????? (touto, community, city-state), Umbrian ???????????????????? (totam, tribe, acc.), Old English þēod (a nation, people, tribe), from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂ (people). More at English Dutch, English thede.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈtəʊ.təl/
  • (General American) enPR: tōʹtl, IPA(key): /ˈtoʊ.təl/, [tʰoʊ̯ɾɫ], [tʰɔɾɫ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊtəl

Noun

total (plural totals)

  1. An amount obtained by the addition of smaller amounts.
    A total of £145 was raised by the bring-and-buy stall.
  2. (informal, mathematics) Sum.
    The total of 4, 5 and 6 is 15.

Synonyms

  • (sum): sum

Derived terms

  • subtotal

Translations

See also

Other terms used in arithmetic operations:

Advanced hyperoperations: tetration, pentation, hexation

Adjective

total (comparative more total, superlative most total)

  1. Entire; relating to the whole of something.
  2. (used as an intensifier) Complete; absolute.
  3. (mathematics) (of a function) Defined on all possible inputs.

Synonyms

  • (entire): entire, full, whole; see also Thesaurus:entire
  • (complete): absolute, complete, utter; see also Thesaurus:total

Derived terms

  • total allergy syndrome
  • total eclipse
  • totalism
  • totalitarian
  • totality
  • totally
  • total order
  • total war

Translations

Verb

total (third-person singular simple present totals, present participle (UK) totalling or (US) totaling, simple past and past participle (UK) totalled or (US) totaled)

  1. (transitive) To add up; to calculate the sum of.
    Synonym: sum
  2. To equal a total of; to amount to.
  3. (transitive, US, slang) To demolish; to wreck completely. (from total loss)
    Synonyms: demolish, trash, wreck
  4. (intransitive) To amount to; to add up to.

Translations

Anagrams

  • lotta

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin tōtālis.

Adjective

total (epicene, plural totales)

  1. total

Noun

total m (plural totales)

  1. total

Derived terms

  • en total

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin tōtālis, attested from the 16th century.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /toˈtal/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /tuˈtal/

Adjective

total (masculine and feminine plural totals)

  1. total

Derived terms

  • totalment

Related terms

  • totalitat

Noun

total m (plural totals)

  1. total

Derived terms

  • en total

References

Further reading

  • “total” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “total” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “total” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Etymology 1

From French total.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /totaːl/, [tˢoˈtˢæːˀl]

Adjective

total

  1. total
Inflection

Noun

total c (singular definite totalen, plural indefinite totaler)

  1. total
Inflection

Etymology 2

Compound of to (two) and tal (number).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /total/, [ˈtˢotˢal]

Noun

total n (singular definite totallet, plural indefinite totaller)

  1. two
Inflection
Synonyms
  • 2-tal

French

Etymology

From Latin tōtālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɔ.tal/
  • Homophones: totale, totales

Adjective

total (feminine singular totale, masculine plural totaux, feminine plural totales)

  1. total
  2. perfect

Antonyms

  • (total): partiel

Noun

total m (plural totaux)

  1. total

Related terms

  • au total
  • question totale
  • sous-total
  • totalement
  • totaliser
  • totalitaire
  • totalité
  • tout

Further reading

  • “total” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Etymology

From Latin tōtālis.

Adjective

total m or f (plural totais)

  1. complete, entire

Noun

total m (plural totais)

  1. total

Further reading

  • “total” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

German

Etymology

From Latin tōtālis.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -aːl

Adjective

total (not comparable)

  1. total

Declension


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin tōtālis, from totus.

Adjective

total (neuter singular totalt, definite singular and plural totale)

  1. total

Derived terms

  • totalskade
  • totaltap

References

  • “total” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin tōtālis, from totus.

Adjective

total (neuter singular totalt, definite singular and plural totale)

  1. total

Derived terms

  • totalskadd
  • totaltap

References

  • “total” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Etymology

From Medieval Latin tōtālis (total), from Latin tōtus (whole) + -ālis (-al).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: to‧tal
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Adjective

total m or f (plural totais, comparable)

  1. complete; entire (to the greatest extent)
    Synonyms: completo, inteiro
  2. total (relating to the whole of something)

Antonyms

  • (complete): incompleto, parcial

Noun

total m (plural totais)

  1. total (amount obtained by the addition of smaller amounts)
    Synonym: totalidade

Related terms


Romanian

Etymology

From French total

Adjective

total m or n (feminine singular totală, masculine plural totali, feminine and neuter plural totale)

  1. total

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Medieval Latin tōtālis, from tōtus (all, whole, entire).

Adjective

total (plural totales)

  1. total, complete, outright

Adverb

total

  1. (colloquial) basically, so, in short (used to summarise)

Noun

total m (plural totales)

  1. total

Derived terms

  • en total

See also

  • todo

References

  • “total” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

From German total, from French total, from Latin totalis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʊˈtɑːl/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːl

Adjective

total (not comparable)

  1. total

Declension

References

  • total in Svensk ordbok (SO)

Anagrams

  • Lotta, lotta

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