entourage vs suite what difference

what is difference between entourage and suite

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French entourage, from entourer (to surround).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɒn.tʊ.ɹɑːʒ/, /ˈɑ̃ː.tʊ.ɹɑːʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɑn.tə.ɹɑʒ/

Noun

entourage (plural entourages)

  1. A retinue of attendants, associates or followers.
  2. (topology) A binary relation in a uniform space which generalises the notion of two points being no farther apart than a given fixed distance; a uniform neighbourhood.

Translations


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French entourage, from entourer (to surround).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑn.tuˈraː.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: en‧tou‧ra‧ge
  • Rhymes: -aːʒə

Noun

entourage f (plural entourages)

  1. entourage (retinue of associates or attendants)
  2. decoration surrounding something

French

Etymology

From entourer +‎ -age.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃.tu.ʁaʒ/

Noun

entourage m (plural entourages)

  1. ornament, decoration surrounding something
    Entourage de fleurs, de perles.
  2. group of acquaintances
    Cet homme a un mauvais entourage.

Descendants

  • Dutch: entourage
  • English: entourage
  • Italian: entourage
  • Polish: entourage
  • Portuguese: entourage

References

“entourage” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


Italian

Etymology

From French entourage.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /an.tuˈraʒ/

Noun

entourage m (invariable)

  1. entourage, retinue

References

Further reading

  • entourage in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Polish

Etymology

From French entourage.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //ãtuˈraʂ//
  • Hyphenation: en‧tou‧rage
  • Rhymes: -uraʂ

Noun

entourage m inan

  1. (literary) ambiance, environment, surroundings
    Synonyms: otoczenie, środowisko

Declension

Further reading

  • entourage in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • entourage in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From French entourage.

Noun

entourage m (plural entourages)

  1. entourage (retinue of attendants, associates or followers)
  2. clique (one’s social group of friends)

Further reading

  • “entourage” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French suite. See also the doublet suit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /swiːt/
  • Rhymes: -iːt
  • Homophone: sweet
  • Hyphenation: suite

Noun

suite (plural suites)

  1. A retinue or company of attendants, as of a distinguished personage
    the ambassador’s suite
  2. A connected series or succession of objects; a number of things used or classed together
    a suite of rooms
    a suite of minerals
  3. A group of connected rooms, usually separable from other rooms by means of access.
  4. (music) A musical form, popular before the time of the sonata, consisting of a string or series of pieces all in the same key, mostly in various dance rhythms, with sometimes an elaborate prelude.
  5. (music) An excerpt of instrumental music from a larger work that contains other elements besides the music; for example, the Nutcracker Suite is the music (but not the dancing) from the ballet The Nutcracker, and the Carmen Suite is the instrumental music (but not the singing and dancing) from the opera Carmen.
  6. (computing) A group of related computer programs distributed together.

Hyponyms

  • (computing): office suite, test suite
  • (music): dance suite

Related terms

  • ensuite

Translations

References

  • suite on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Stuie, Tieus, etuis, use it, étuis

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French suite.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsʋi.tə/
  • Hyphenation: sui‧te
  • Rhymes: -itə

Noun

suite f (plural suites)

  1. suite (group of interconnected rooms)
  2. (music) suite (music piece)

French

Etymology

From Old French suite, from earlier siute, from Vulgar Latin *sequita, (instead of classical secūta), as the feminine past participle of *sequere, from Latin sequor, sequi.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sɥit/

Noun

suite f (plural suites)

  1. result
  2. sequel
  3. next step, next steps, that which follows, remainder, rest
  4. (poker) straight
  5. (mathematics) sequence
  6. suite (group of connected rooms)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • suivre

Descendants

Further reading

  • “suite” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • étuis, situe, situé, usité

Irish

Alternative forms

  • suidhte (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsˠɪtʲə/

Adjective

suite

  1. fixed, secured
  2. mounted
  3. fast
  4. located

Synonyms

  • (fixed, secured): fosaitheach, feistithe, daingnithe
  • (mounted): gléasta
  • (fast): ceangailte

Noun

suite

  1. genitive singular of suí

Participle

suite

  1. past participle of suigh

Mutation


Japanese

Romanization

suite

  1. Rōmaji transcription of すいて

Latin

Verb

suite

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of suō

Middle English

Noun

suite

  1. Alternative form of sute

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

Borrowed from French suite.

Noun

suite m (definite singular suiten, indefinite plural suiter, definite plural suitene)

  1. a suite (set of rooms)
  2. a suite (music)
  3. a suite (group of people in attendance)

References

  • “suite” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from French suite.

Noun

suite m (definite singular suiten, indefinite plural suitar, definite plural suitane)

  1. a suite (set of rooms)
  2. a suite (music)
  3. a suite (group of people in attendance)

References

  • “suite” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Alternative forms

Etymology

From metathesis of earlier siute, sieute from Vulgar Latin *sequita, (instead of classical secūta), as the feminine past participle of *sequere, from Latin sequor, sequi.

Noun

suite f (oblique plural suites, nominative singular suite, nominative plural suites)

  1. pursuit (act of pursuing)

Related terms

  • sivre

Descendants

  • English: suit
  • French: suite
    • English: suite
      • Spanish: suite

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (sieute)
  • siute on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from French suite.

Noun

suite f (plural suites)

  1. suite (rooms, hotel)

Further reading

  • “suite” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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