entrails vs viscera what difference

what is difference between entrails and viscera

English

Etymology

From Middle English entraille, entrailles, from Old French entrailles, from Vulgar Latin intrālia, from Latin interānea, from interāneus, from inter. Compare Spanish entraña.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈentɹeɪlz/

Noun

entrails

  1. (archaic) plural of entrail

entrails pl (plural only)

  1. The internal organs of an animal, especially the intestines. [from 14th c.]
    Synonyms: bowels, inmeat, innards, intestines, offal, viscera
  2. (obsolete) The seat of the emotions. [14th–18th c.]

Translations

References

  • James A. H. Murray [et al.], editors (1884–1928), “Entrails”, in A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (Oxford English Dictionary), volume III (D–E), London: Clarendon Press, OCLC 15566697, page 221, column 2.

Anagrams

  • Latiners, art lines, larnites, latrines, ratlines, retinals, slantier, trainels, trenails


English

Noun

viscera

  1. plural of viscus

Noun

viscera pl (plural only)

  1. Collectively, the internal organs of the body, especially those contained within the abdominal and thoracic cavities, such as the liver, heart, or stomach.
  2. The intestines.

Synonyms

  • entrails
  • innards
  • intestines
  • offal

Derived terms

  • visceral
  • eviscerate
  • megaviscera

Translations

References

  • viscera in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • varices

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈu̯is.ke.ra/, [ˈu̯ɪs̠kɛɾä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈvi.ʃe.ra/, [ˈviːʃɛrɑ]

Noun

viscera

  1. nominative plural of viscus
  2. accusative plural of viscus
  3. vocative plural of viscus

References

  • viscera in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

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