enviousness vs envy what difference

what is difference between enviousness and envy

English

Etymology

envious +‎ -ness

Noun

enviousness (usually uncountable, plural enviousnesses)

  1. The state of being envious.

Anagrams

  • venosinuses


English

Etymology

From Middle English envie, from Old French envie, from Latin invidia (envy), from invidere (to look at with malice), from in- (on, upon) + videre (to look, see).

Displaced native Old English æfest.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnvi/

Noun

envy (countable and uncountable, plural envies)

  1. Resentful desire of something possessed by another or others (but not limited to material possessions). [from 13th c.]
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Samuel Simmons, line 263–264:
      No bliss enjoyed by us excites his envy more.
    • 1804, Alexander Pope, The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, page 71:
      Envy, to which the ignoble mind’s a slave,
      Is emulation in the learned or brave.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, page 9:
      distilling therefrom an acid envy that robbed her napoleon of all its savour.
    • 1983, Stanley Rosen, Plato’s Sophist: The Drama of Original and Image, page 66:
      Theodorus assures Socrates that no envy will prevent the Stranger from responding
  2. An object of envious notice or feeling.
    • 1843, Thomas Macaulay, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Carey & Hart, page 277:
      This constitution in former days used to be the envy of the world[.]
    • 2008, Lich King, “Black Metal Sucks”, Toxic Zombie Onslaught.
  3. (obsolete) Hatred, enmity, ill-feeling. [14th–18th c.]
  4. (obsolete) Emulation; rivalry.
    • c. 1631-1636, John Ford, The Fancies Chaste and Noble
      Such as cleanliness and decency
      Prompt to a virtuous envy.
  5. (obsolete) Public odium; ill repute.
    • to lay the envy of the war upon Cicero

Translations

Verb

envy (third-person singular simple present envies, present participle envying, simple past and past participle envied)

  1. (transitive) To feel displeasure or hatred towards (someone) for their good fortune or possessions. [from 14th c.]
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To have envious feelings (at). [15th-18th c.]
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      Who envy at the prosperity of the wicked?
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To give (something) to (someone) grudgingly or reluctantly; to begrudge. [16th–18th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.v:
      But that sweet Cordiall, which can restore
      A loue-sick hart, she did to him enuy [].
  4. (obsolete) To show malice or ill will; to rail.
  5. (obsolete) To do harm to; to injure; to disparage.
    • 1621, John Fletcher The Pilgrim
      If I make a lie
      To gain your love and envy my best mistress,
      Put me against a wall.
  6. (obsolete) To hate.
  7. (obsolete) To emulate.

Related terms

  • envious
  • social envy

Translations

Anagrams

  • veny

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