envisage vs imagine what difference

what is difference between envisage and imagine

English

Etymology

From French envisager, from en (in) + visage (visage); see English visage.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛnˈvɪzɪdʒ/, /ɪnˈvɪzɪdʒ/

Verb

envisage (third-person singular simple present envisages, present participle envisaging, simple past and past participle envisaged)

  1. To conceive or see something within one’s mind; to imagine or envision.
    • 1860, James McCosh, The Intuitions of the Mind Inductively Investigated
      From the very dawn of existence the infant must envisage self, and body acting on self.

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • envisage in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • envisage in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Verb

envisage

  1. first-person singular present indicative of envisager
  2. third-person singular present indicative of envisager
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of envisager
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of envisager
  5. second-person singular imperative of envisager

Anagrams

  • vengeais


English

Etymology

From Middle English ymagynen, from Middle French imaginer, from Latin imāginor, from imāginem, the accusative singular of imāgō (a copy, likeness, image).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈmædʒ.ɪn/
  • Hyphenation: imag‧ine

Verb

imagine (third-person singular simple present imagines, present participle imagining, simple past and past participle imagined)

  1. (transitive) To form a mental image of something; to envision or create something in one’s mind.
  2. (transitive) To believe in something created by one’s own mind.
  3. (transitive) to assume
  4. (transitive) to conjecture or guess
  5. (intransitive) to use one’s imagination
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To contrive in purpose; to scheme; to devise.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs
  • This is generally a stative verb that rarely takes the continuous inflection. See Category:English stative verbs

Synonyms

  • ween

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

imagine (plural imagines)

  1. (fandom slang) A short fanfic or prompt placing a reader insert in a novel scenario with a character or celebrity.
    • 2015, Laura Starling, “FFIC101: An Introduction to the Horrors of Fanfiction”, Critic (University of Otago), 2 March 2015, page 21:
      Some imagines are more sexual and creepy than others: “Imagine Stiles walking in on you giving Scott a blowjob.”
    • 2016, Jocelyn Chambers, “The Exclusion Of People Of Color In Fanfiction”, Majesty, December 2016, page 96:
      i personally like imagines and fanfics so i found a good amount of kylo ren x reader fics and started going through them.
    • 2019, “thranduilsperkybutt”, quoted in “Author Spotlight: thranduilsperkybutt”, Lemon, February 2019, page 37:
      If I get inspired immediately, I can bust out an imagine in 5-10 minutes.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:imagine.

French

Pronunciation

Verb

imagine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of imaginer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of imaginer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of imaginer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of imaginer
  5. second-person singular imperative of imaginer

Latin

Noun

imāgine

  1. ablative singular of imāgō

Portuguese

Verb

imagine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of imaginar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of imaginar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of imaginar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of imaginar

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin imāgō, imāginem, French image.

Noun

imagine f (plural imagini)

  1. image

Declension

Related terms

  • imagina

See also

  • poză

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /imaˈxine/, [i.maˈxi.ne]

Verb

imagine

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of imaginar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of imaginar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of imaginar.

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