envy vs invidia what difference

what is difference between envy and invidia

English

Etymology

From Middle English envie, from Old French envie, from Latin invidia (envy), from invidere (to look at with malice), from in- (on, upon) + videre (to look, see).

Displaced native Old English æfest.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛnvi/

Noun

envy (countable and uncountable, plural envies)

  1. Resentful desire of something possessed by another or others (but not limited to material possessions). [from 13th c.]
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Samuel Simmons, line 263–264:
      No bliss enjoyed by us excites his envy more.
    • 1804, Alexander Pope, The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, page 71:
      Envy, to which the ignoble mind’s a slave,
      Is emulation in the learned or brave.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, page 9:
      distilling therefrom an acid envy that robbed her napoleon of all its savour.
    • 1983, Stanley Rosen, Plato’s Sophist: The Drama of Original and Image, page 66:
      Theodorus assures Socrates that no envy will prevent the Stranger from responding
  2. An object of envious notice or feeling.
    • 1843, Thomas Macaulay, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Carey & Hart, page 277:
      This constitution in former days used to be the envy of the world[.]
    • 2008, Lich King, “Black Metal Sucks”, Toxic Zombie Onslaught.
  3. (obsolete) Hatred, enmity, ill-feeling. [14th–18th c.]
  4. (obsolete) Emulation; rivalry.
    • c. 1631-1636, John Ford, The Fancies Chaste and Noble
      Such as cleanliness and decency
      Prompt to a virtuous envy.
  5. (obsolete) Public odium; ill repute.
    • to lay the envy of the war upon Cicero

Translations

Verb

envy (third-person singular simple present envies, present participle envying, simple past and past participle envied)

  1. (transitive) To feel displeasure or hatred towards (someone) for their good fortune or possessions. [from 14th c.]
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To have envious feelings (at). [15th-18th c.]
    • 1650, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      Who envy at the prosperity of the wicked?
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To give (something) to (someone) grudgingly or reluctantly; to begrudge. [16th–18th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.v:
      But that sweet Cordiall, which can restore
      A loue-sick hart, she did to him enuy [].
  4. (obsolete) To show malice or ill will; to rail.
  5. (obsolete) To do harm to; to injure; to disparage.
    • 1621, John Fletcher The Pilgrim
      If I make a lie
      To gain your love and envy my best mistress,
      Put me against a wall.
  6. (obsolete) To hate.
  7. (obsolete) To emulate.

Related terms

  • envious
  • social envy

Translations

Anagrams

  • veny


Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin invidia (envy). Doublet of the obsolete inveggia, itself probably taken from Old Occitan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /inˈvi.dja/

Noun

invidia f (plural invidie)

  1. envy

Related terms

  • invidiabile
  • invidiare
  • invidioso
  • invido

Verb

invidia

  1. inflection of invidiare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

See also

  • sette peccati capitali

Anagrams

  • divinai, in via di, indivia

Latin

Etymology

From invidus (envious), from invideō (envy, grudge).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /inˈu̯i.di.a/, [ɪnˈu̯ɪd̪iä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /inˈvi.di.a/, [inˈviːd̪iɑ]

Noun

invidia f (genitive invidiae); first declension

  1. envy, grudge, jealousy, prejudice, spite
  2. an object of ill-will
  3. odium, unpopularity, dislike, infamy, resentment, ill-will

Declension

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • invidiōsus

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • invidia in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • invidia in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • invidia in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • invidia in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
  • invidia in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Romanian

Etymology

From invidie +‎ -a or Italian invidiare.

Verb

a invidia (third-person singular present invidiază, past participle invidiat1st conj.

  1. to envy

Conjugation


Spanish

Noun

invidia f (plural invidias)

  1. Obsolete spelling of envidia

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