epic vs epical what difference

what is difference between epic and epical

English

Alternative forms

  • epick (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛp.ɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɛpɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle French épique, from Latin epicus, from Ancient Greek ἐπικός (epikós), from ἔπος (épos, word, story).

Noun

epic (plural epics)

  1. An extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a deity, demigod (heroic epic), other legend or traditional hero.
  2. A series of events considered appropriate to an epic.
  3. (computing) In software development, a large or extended user story.
Synonyms
  • épopée
  • epos
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

epic (comparative more epic, superlative most epic)

  1. Of or relating to an epic.
    Synonym: epical
    • 1983, Jan Knappert, Epic Poetry in Swahili and other African Languages, p. 58:
      The main theme of epic poetry is, of course, the hero, his life, his greatness of character, his deeds and his death.
  2. Momentously heroic; grand in scale or character
    • China’s epic traffic jam “vanished” [title of article]
  3. (colloquial, slang, informal) Extending beyond the usual or ordinary.
    Synonyms: extraordinary, momentous, remarkable
Derived terms
  • epically
  • epicness
  • epic fail
Translations

Etymology 2

From epi-, from Ancient Greek ἐπί (epí, on top of).

Adjective

epic (not comparable)

  1. (category theory, of a morphism) That is an epimorphism.

Anagrams

  • ECPI, pice

Danish

Etymology

From English epic, from Latin epicus, from Ancient Greek ἐπικός (epikós), from ἔπος (épos, word, story).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛpɪk/

Adjective

epic (neuter epic, plural and definite singular attributive epic)

  1. (slang, informal) Extending beyond the usual or ordinary; extraordinary, momentous, great.
    Det var virkeligt epic.

Romanian

Etymology

From French épique, from Latin epicus.

Adjective

epic m or n (feminine singular epică, masculine plural epici, feminine and neuter plural epice)

  1. epic

Declension



English

Etymology

From epic +‎ -al.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛpɪkəl/

Adjective

epical (comparative more epical, superlative most epical)

  1. (now rare) Of or pertaining to epic literature; epic, grandiose.
    • 2013, Thomas Pynchon, Bleeding Edge, Vintage 2014, p. 457:
      Camp Tewattsirokwas was the brainchild of a Trotskyite couple, the Gimelmans from Cedarhurst, begun back at the time of the Schachtman unpleasantness amid epical all-night screaming matches […].

Noun

epical (plural epicals)

  1. (literature) Any book containing two or more epics.
  2. (poetry) A lengthy, revered narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation.

Anagrams

  • Plaice, piacle, plaice, plicae

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