epic vs epos what difference

what is difference between epic and epos

English

Alternative forms

  • epick (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛp.ɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ɛpɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle French épique, from Latin epicus, from Ancient Greek ἐπικός (epikós), from ἔπος (épos, word, story).

Noun

epic (plural epics)

  1. An extended narrative poem in elevated or dignified language, celebrating the feats of a deity, demigod (heroic epic), other legend or traditional hero.
  2. A series of events considered appropriate to an epic.
  3. (computing) In software development, a large or extended user story.
Synonyms
  • épopée
  • epos
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

epic (comparative more epic, superlative most epic)

  1. Of or relating to an epic.
    Synonym: epical
    • 1983, Jan Knappert, Epic Poetry in Swahili and other African Languages, p. 58:
      The main theme of epic poetry is, of course, the hero, his life, his greatness of character, his deeds and his death.
  2. Momentously heroic; grand in scale or character
    • China’s epic traffic jam “vanished” [title of article]
  3. (colloquial, slang, informal) Extending beyond the usual or ordinary.
    Synonyms: extraordinary, momentous, remarkable
Derived terms
  • epically
  • epicness
  • epic fail
Translations

Etymology 2

From epi-, from Ancient Greek ἐπί (epí, on top of).

Adjective

epic (not comparable)

  1. (category theory, of a morphism) That is an epimorphism.

Anagrams

  • ECPI, pice

Danish

Etymology

From English epic, from Latin epicus, from Ancient Greek ἐπικός (epikós), from ἔπος (épos, word, story).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛpɪk/

Adjective

epic (neuter epic, plural and definite singular attributive epic)

  1. (slang, informal) Extending beyond the usual or ordinary; extraordinary, momentous, great.
    Det var virkeligt epic.

Romanian

Etymology

From French épique, from Latin epicus.

Adjective

epic m or n (feminine singular epică, masculine plural epici, feminine and neuter plural epice)

  1. epic

Declension



English

Etymology

Latin epos, from Ancient Greek ἔπος (épos, word, song, epic).

Noun

epos (plural eposes)

  1. (obsolete) An epic.

Anagrams

  • ESOP, PEOs, opes, peos, peso, poes, pose, posé, sope

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɛpos]

Noun

epos m

  1. epic (extended narrative poem)

Related terms

  • epický
  • epika

Danish

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἔπος (épos, word, song, epic).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈeːpʰʌs]

Noun

epos n (singular definite eposset, plural indefinite eposser)

  1. epic (narrative poem)

Declension

References

  • “epos” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin epos, from Ancient Greek ἔπος (épos).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈeː.pɔs/
  • Hyphenation: epos

Noun

epos n (plural epen or epossen, diminutive eposje n)

  1. epic (extended narrative poem, usually in dactylic hexametre)

Synonyms

  • epopee
  • heldendicht

Derived terms

  • dierenepos
  • epicus
  • epiek
  • episch
  • epyllium

Related terms

  • epopee

Anagrams

  • poes, pose, soep

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin epos, from Ancient Greek ἔπος (épos).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.pos/
  • Hyphenation: è‧pos

Noun

epos m (singular only)

  1. an epic
  2. the epics and legends of a particular population
  3. (rare) an event considered appropriate to an epic
    Synonym: epopea

Related terms

  • epico

Anagrams

  • peso, pesò, pose

Latin

Etymology

Borrowed from Ancient Greek ἔπος (épos).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.pos/, [ˈɛpɔs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈe.pos/, [ˈɛːpɔs]

Noun

epos n sg (indeclinable, no genitive)

  1. an epic, a heroic poem

Usage notes

  • Occurring only in the nominative and accusative forms.

Declension

Not declined; used only in the nominative and accusative singular., singular only.

References

  • epos in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • epos in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • epos in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • epos in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Ed. Sig. Her, Tiro der Anfänger im Latein, eine Formenlehre der lateinischen Sprache mit Expositions- und Compositionsstoff, Stuttgart, 1860, p. 16: “Die Neutra auf os haben im Genit. us, im Dat. i, im Accus. u. Voc. os, Ablat. o, z. B. epos (ein Heldengedicht), epus, epi, epos, epo. So: melos der Gesang.” — That is: ‘The neuters in os have [in singular] genitive us, dative i, accusative and vocative os, ablative o, e.g. epos (a heroic poem), epus, epi, epos, epo. In the same manner: melos (song).’

Polish

Etymology

From Latin epos, from Ancient Greek ἔπος (épos).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛ.pɔs/
  • Hyphenation: e‧pos
  • Rhymes: -ɛpɔs

Noun

epos m inan

  1. epic (extended narrative poem)
    Synonym: epopeja

Declension

Further reading

  • epos in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • epos in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Noun

epos n

  1. an epic, a narrative poem

Declension

Related terms

  • epik
  • epiker
  • episk
  • rymdepos

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