epicurean vs gourmet what difference

what is difference between epicurean and gourmet

English

Etymology

From Epicurean (follower of Epicureanism).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˌɛp.ɪ.kjʊəˈɹiː.n̩/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˌɛp.ɪ.kjʊˈɹi.n̩/, /ˌɛp.ɪˈkjʊ.ɹi.n̩/
  • Rhymes: -iːən
  • Hyphenation: ep‧i‧cu‧re‧an

Adjective

epicurean (comparative more epicurean, superlative most epicurean)

  1. Pursuing pleasure, especially in reference to food or comfort.
  2. Devoted to luxurious living.

Synonyms

  • gluttonous
  • hedonistic
  • libertine

Noun

epicurean (plural epicureans)

  1. One who is devoted to pleasure.

Usage notes

Modern accepted use of the terms epicurean and Epicureanism refers often to the appreciation of, and indulgence in good food (gourmet), luxury, hedonism, and sensual pleasure. This strays significantly from the original philosophic intent of Epicureanism. The philosophy indeed elevated pleasure and happiness as the most worthy pursuit, but specifically warned against fine food and frequent sex, for it could lead to dissatisfaction later. Instead, the goal was a long-term pleasure, marked by serenity and temperance, achieved through moderation rather than indulging. Modern senses of gourmet, luxury, hedonism, sensual pleasure and lust are mostly in contrast with the original ancient teachings.

Synonyms

  • glutton
  • hedonist
  • See also Thesaurus:sensualist


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French gourmet, from Middle French gourmet, from Old French groumet (wine broker, valet in charge of wines, servant) from groume, grommes (wine-taster, manservant), apparently from Middle English grom, grome (boy, valet, servant), from Old English *grōma (male child, boy, youth), akin to Old English grōwan (to grow). More at groom.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡʊɹˈmeɪ/, /ˈɡʊɹmeɪ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡʊəmeɪ/, /ˈɡɔːmeɪ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪ

Adjective

gourmet (not comparable)

  1. (of food and drink) Fine; of superior quality. [from 1820]

Usage notes

Gourmet has become somewhat debased by marketing usage, and is considered by some a pretentious middlebrow term. Such users tend to prefer terms such as artisanal (emphasizing the craft) for fine food.

Coordinate terms

  • artisanal

Translations

Noun

gourmet (plural gourmets)

  1. A connoisseur in eating and drinking; someone who takes their food seriously.

Usage notes

Gourmet emphasizes interest in quality of food and enjoyment of eating, sometimes to an obsessive degree: someone who “lives to eat rather than eating to live”. By contrast, a gourmand is someone more interested in quantity of food than quality.

Synonyms

  • foodie
  • gourmand

Translations

See also

  • gourmand
  • haute cuisine

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣuːrˈmɛt/, /ɡuːrˈmɛt/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French gourmet.

Noun

gourmet m (plural gourmets, diminutive gourmetje n)

  1. a person of refined palate for food and drink, a gourmet, a foodie
  2. a kind of festive meal, similar to raclette or Chinese hot pot, prepared at the table by the diners in individual pots heated by a raclette grill
Derived terms
  • gourmetten
  • gourmetpan
  • gourmetset

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gourmet

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of gourmetten
  2. imperative of gourmetten

Finnish

Etymology

From French gourmet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡurmeː/, [ˈɡurme̞ː]

Adjective

gourmet

  1. Alternative form of gurmee

Declension

Noun

gourmet

  1. Alternative form of gurmee

Declension


French

Etymology

Middle French gourmet, from Old French groumet (wine broker, valet in charge of wines, servant) from Old French grommes (manservant), from Middle English grom, grome (boy, valet, servant) of unknown origin, perhaps from Old English *grōma (male child, boy, youth) from Old English grōwan (to grow). More at groom.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡuʁ.mɛ/

Noun

gourmet m (plural gourmets)

  1. (of wines) a wine expert, especially one who is adept at determining the label, date, and sundry other qualities solely by smatch
  2. (more commonly) a culinary connoisseur, gourmet

Descendants

Further reading

  • “gourmet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From French gourmet.

Noun

gourmet m or f (invariable)

  1. gourmet

Further reading

  • gourmet in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Portuguese

Alternative forms

  • gurmê (rare)

Etymology

From French gourmet.

Adjective

gourmet (plural gourmet, comparable)

  1. (of food) gourmet; fine

Noun

gourmet m, f (plural gourmets)

  1. gourmet (a person who appreciates good food)

Further reading

  • “gourmet” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

From French gourmet.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡuɾˈmet/, [ɡuɾˈmet̪]
  • IPA(key): /ɡuɾˈme/, [ɡuɾˈme]

Adjective

gourmet (plural gourmets)

  1. gourmet

Further reading

  • “gourmet” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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