episode vs sequence what difference

what is difference between episode and sequence

English

Etymology

From French épisode, from New Latin *epīsodium, from Ancient Greek ἐπεισόδιον (epeisódion, a parenthetic addition, episode), neuter of ἐπεισόδιος (epeisódios, following upon the entrance, coming in besides, adventitious), from ἐπί (epí, on) + εἰς (eis, into) + ὁδός (hodós, way).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛpɪsəʊd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛpɪsoʊd/
  • Hyphenation: epi‧sode

Noun

episode (plural episodes)

  1. An incident, action, or time period standing out by itself, but more or less connected with a complete series of events.
  2. An instalment of a drama told in parts, as in a TV series.

Hyponyms

  • (instalment of a TV series): bottle episode

Derived terms

  • episodic
  • episodical

Translations

Further reading

  • episode in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • episode in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • poesied

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from French épisode, from Ancient Greek ἐπεισόδιον (epeisódion).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌeː.piˈsoː.də/
  • Hyphenation: epi‧so‧de
  • Rhymes: -oːdə

Noun

episode f (plural episoden or episodes, diminutive episodetje n)

  1. An episode (instalment).
  2. An episode (action, time period or sequence of events).

Synonyms

  • (drama): aflevering

Derived terms

  • episodisch

Descendants

  • Indonesian: episode

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch episode, from French épisode, from Ancient Greek ἐπεισόδιον (epeisódion).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛpiˈsodə]
  • Hyphenation: èpi‧so‧dê

Noun

èpisodê (first-person possessive episodeku, second-person possessive episodemu, third-person possessive episodenya)

  1. episode: an incident, action, or time period standing out by itself, but more or less connected with a complete series of events.
    Synonyms: kejadian, peristiwa

Alternative forms

  • episod (nonstandard Indonesian), episod (standard Malay)

Related terms

Further reading

  • “episode” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἐπεισόδιον (epeisódion), via French épisode

Noun

episode m (definite singular episoden, indefinite plural episoder, definite plural episodene)

  1. an episode
  2. an incident

References

  • “episode” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Ancient Greek ἐπεισόδιον (epeisódion), via French épisode

Noun

episode m (definite singular episoden, indefinite plural episodar, definite plural episodane)

  1. an episode
  2. an incident

References

  • “episode” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Etymology

From Middle English sequence, borrowed from French sequence (a sequence of cards, answering verses), from Late Latin sequentia (a following), from Latin sequens (following), from sequi (to follow); see sequent.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsiːkwəns/

Noun

sequence (countable and uncountable, plural sequences)

  1. A set of things next to each other in a set order; a series
  2. (uncountable) The state of being sequent or following; order of succession.
    Complete the listed tasks in sequence.
  3. A series of musical phrases where a theme or melody is repeated, with some change each time, such as in pitch or length (example: opening of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony).
  4. A musical composition used in some Catholic Masses between the readings. The most famous sequence is the Dies Irae (Day of Wrath) formerly used in funeral services.
  5. (mathematics) An ordered list of objects, typically indexed with natural numbers.
  6. (now rare) A subsequent event; a consequence or result.
    • 1891, Mary Noailles Murfree, In the “Stranger People’s” Country, Nebraska 2005, pp. 12-13:
      he found no words to convey the impressions he had received; then he gave way to the anger always the sequence of the antagonism of opinion between them.
  7. A series of shots that depict a single action or style in a film, television show etc.
  8. (card games) A meld consisting of three or more cards of successive ranks in the same suit, such as the four, five and six of hearts.

Usage notes

  • (mathematics): Beginning students often confuse sequence with series.

Synonyms

  • (a set of things next to each other in a set order): See Thesaurus:sequence

Hypernyms

  • (mathematics): function

Hyponyms

  • presequence
  • (computing): escape sequence

Meronyms

  • (mathematics): term

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

sequence (third-person singular simple present sequences, present participle sequencing, simple past and past participle sequenced)

  1. (transitive) to arrange in an order
  2. (transitive, biochemistry) to determine the order of things, especially of amino acids in a protein, or of bases in a nucleic acid
  3. (transitive) to produce (music) with a sequencer

Translations

References

Further reading

  • sequence in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sequence in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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