equivocation vs tergiversation what difference

what is difference between equivocation and tergiversation

English

Alternative forms

  • æquivocation (archaic)

Etymology

c. 1380, from Old French equivocation, from Medieval Latin aequivocātiōnem, accusative singular of aequivocātiō, from aequivocō, from Late Latin aequivocus (ambiguous, equivocal), from Latin aequus (equal) + vocō (call);
a calque of Ancient Greek ὁμωνυμία (homōnumía).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˌkwɪvəˈkeɪʃən/, /ɪˌkwɪvəˈkeɪʃn̩/, /əˌkwɪvəˈkeɪʃn/
  • Hyphenation: e‧quiv‧o‧ca‧tion
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

equivocation (countable and uncountable, plural equivocations)

  1. (logic) A logical fallacy resulting from the use of multiple meanings of a single expression.
  2. The use of expressions susceptible of a double signification, possibly intentionally and with the aim of misleading.

Related terms

  • amphiboly, evasion, evasiveness, prevarication

Translations

References


Old French

Noun

equivocation f (oblique plural equivocations, nominative singular equivocation, nominative plural equivocations)

  1. equivocation
    Si avoit trovee occasion de li gaber par l’equivocation de son nom


English

Etymology

From Latin tergiversātiō.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /tɝd͡ʒɪvɚˈseɪʃən/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɜːd͡ʒɪvəˈseɪʃən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

tergiversation (countable and uncountable, plural tergiversations)

  1. The act of abandoning something or someone, of changing sides; desertion; betrayal.
  2. The act of evading any clear course of action or speech, of being deliberately ambiguous; equivocation; fickleness.

Related terms

  • tergiversate

Translations

Anagrams

  • interrogatives, reinvestigator

French

Etymology

From Latin tergiversātiō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɛʁ.ʒi.vɛʁ.sa.sjɔ̃/

Noun

tergiversation f (plural tergiversations)

  1. Delays in providing a clear answer caused by hesitations or an outright unwillingness to be forthright.

Usage notes

  • Usage as a pluralia tantum rather than as a mass noun is more common.

Further reading

  • “tergiversation” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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