erect vs vertical what difference

what is difference between erect and vertical

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈɹɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt
  • Hyphenation: erect

Etymology 1

From Middle English erect, a borrowing from Latin ērectus (upright), past participle of ērigō (raise, set up), from ē- (out) + regō (to direct, keep straight, guide).

Adjective

erect (comparative more erect, superlative most erect)

  1. Upright; vertical or reaching broadly upwards.
    • 1789, Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, volume 6, chapter 64.
      Among the Greek colonies and churches of Asia, Philadelphia is still erect — a column in a scene of ruins.
  2. (of body parts) Rigid, firm; standing out perpendicularly, especially as the result of stimulation.
    Synonyms: hard, stiff
  3. (of a man) Having an erect penis
    Synonyms: hard, stiff
  4. (obsolete) Bold; confident; free from depression; undismayed.
    • 1827, John Keble, The Christian Year
      But who is he, by years / Bowed, but erect in heart?
  5. (obsolete) Directed upward; raised; uplifted.
  6. Watchful; alert.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      vigilant and erect attention of mind
  7. (heraldry) Elevated, as the tips of wings, heads of serpents, etc.
Antonyms
  • (rigid; standing out perpendicularly): flaccid
Derived terms
  • erectable
  • semierect
Related terms
  • erectile
  • erection
  • erigible
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English erecten, from the adjective (see above).

Verb

erect (third-person singular simple present erects, present participle erecting, simple past and past participle erected)

  1. (transitive) To put up by the fitting together of materials or parts.
  2. (transitive) To cause to stand up or out.
  3. To raise and place in an upright or perpendicular position; to set upright; to raise.
    1. (aviation, of a gyroscopic attitude indicator) To spin up and align to vertical.
  4. To lift up; to elevate; to exalt; to magnify.
    • that didst his state above his hopes erect
    • , Preface
      I, who am a party, am not to erect myself into a judge.
  5. To animate; to encourage; to cheer.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Contentment (sermon)
      It raiseth the dropping spirit, erecting it to a loving complaisance.
  6. (astrology) To cast or draw up (a figure of the heavens, horoscope etc.).
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p. 332:
      In 1581 Parliament made it a statutory felony to erect figures, cast nativities, or calculate by prophecy how long the Queen would live or who would succeed her.
  7. To set up as an assertion or consequence from premises, etc.
    • from fallacious foundations, and misapprehended mediums, erecting conclusions no way inferrible from their premises
    • Malebranche erects this proposition.
  8. To set up or establish; to found; to form; to institute.
    • 1594, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiastical Politie
      to erect a new commonwealth
    • 1812, Arthur Collins & Sir Egerton Brydges, Peerage of England, F.C. and J. Rivington et al, page 330:
      In 1686, he was appointed one of the Commissioners in the new ecclesiastical commission erected by King James, and was proud of that honour.
Synonyms
  • build
Derived terms
  • erecting shop
  • re-erect, reerect
Translations

Anagrams

  • -crete, Crete, recte, terce


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French vertical, from Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈvɜːtɪkəl/
  • (US) enPR: vûr’tĭkəl, IPA(key): /ˈvɝtɪkəl/

Adjective

vertical (comparative more vertical, superlative most vertical)

  1. Standing, pointing, or moving straight up or down; along the direction of a plumb line; perpendicular to something horizontal.
  2. In a two-dimensional Cartesian co-ordinate system, describing the axis y oriented normal (perpendicular, at right angles) to the horizontal axis x.
  3. In a three-dimensional co-ordinate system, describing the axis z oriented normal (perpendicular, orthogonal) to the basic plane xy.
  4. (marketing) Of or pertaining to vertical markets.
  5. (wine tasting) Involving different vintages of the same wine type from the same winery.
  6. (music) Of an interval: having the two notes sound simultaneously.
    Synonym: harmonic
    Antonym: horizontal

Antonyms

  • horizontal

Derived terms

Related terms

  • vortal

Translations

Noun

vertical (plural verticals)

  1. A vertex or zenith.
  2. A vertical geometrical figure; a perpendicular.
  3. An individual slat in a set of vertical blinds.
  4. A vertical component of a structure.
  5. (marketing) A vertical market.
    We offer specialised accounting software targeting various verticals.

Further reading

  • vertical at OneLook Dictionary Search

Asturian

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

Adjective

vertical (epicene, plural verticales)

  1. vertical

Antonyms

  • horizontal

Catalan

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /vəɾ.tiˈkal/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /bər.tiˈkal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /veɾ.tiˈkal/
  • Rhymes: -al

Adjective

vertical (masculine and feminine plural verticals)

  1. vertical

Antonyms

  • horitzontal

Derived terms

  • verticalment

French

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɛʁ.ti.kal/
  • Homophones: verticale, verticales

Adjective

vertical (feminine singular verticale, masculine plural verticaux, feminine plural verticales)

  1. vertical

Derived terms

  • barre verticale

Further reading

  • “vertical” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

Adjective

vertical m or f (plural verticais)

  1. vertical

Antonyms

  • horizontal

Derived terms

  • verticalmente

Ladin

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Adjective

vertical m (feminine singular verticala, masculine plural verticai, feminine plural verticales)

  1. vertical

Piedmontese

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɛrtiˈkal/

Adjective

vertical

  1. vertical

Portuguese

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /veʁt(ʃ)iˈkaw/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /vɨɾtiˈkaɫ/
  • Hyphenation: ver‧ti‧cal

Adjective

vertical m or f (plural verticais, not comparable)

  1. vertical

Antonyms

  • horizontal

Derived terms

  • verticalmente

Romanian

Etymology

From French vertical.

Adjective

vertical m or n (feminine singular verticală, masculine plural verticali, feminine and neuter plural verticale)

  1. vertical

Declension

Related terms

  • verticalitate

Spanish

Etymology

From Late Latin verticālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beɾtiˈkal/, [beɾ.t̪iˈkal]
  • Hyphenation: ver‧ti‧cal

Adjective

vertical (plural verticales)

  1. vertical
  2. portrait (a print orientation where the vertical sides are longer than the horizontal sides.; in smartphones)

Antonyms

  • horizontal

Derived terms

  • verticalmente

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