erode vs fret what difference

what is difference between erode and fret

English

Etymology

From French éroder, from Latin ērōdō

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈɹəʊd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪˈɹoʊd/
  • Rhymes: -əʊd

Verb

erode (third-person singular simple present erodes, present participle eroding, simple past and past participle eroded)

  1. To wear away by abrasion, corrosion or chemical reaction.
  2. (figuratively) To destroy gradually by an ongoing process.
    to erode a person’s trust

Related terms

  • erosion

Translations

Anagrams

  • doree

Italian

Verb

erode

  1. third-person singular present indicative of erodere

Anagrams

  • eredo, eredo-

Latin

Verb

ērōde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of ērōdō

Portuguese

Verb

erode

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of erodir
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of erodir


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /fɹɛt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛt

Etymology 1

From Middle English frēten (to eat; to devour, eat up; to bite, chew; to consume, corrode, destroy; to rub, scrape away; to hurt, sting; to trouble, vex), from Old English fretan (to eat up, devour; to fret; to break, burst), from Proto-Germanic *fraetaną (to consume, devour, eat up), from Proto-Germanic *fra- (for-, prefix meaning ‘completely, fully’) (from Proto-Indo-European *pro- (forward, toward)) + *etaną (to eat) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ed- (to eat)).

The word is cognate with Dutch vreten, fretten (to devour, hog, wolf), Low German freten (to eat up), German fressen (to devour, gobble up, guzzle), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (fraitan, to devour), Swedish fräta (to eat away, corrode, fret); and also related to Danish fråse (to gorge).

The senses meaning “to chafe, rub” could also be due to sound-association with Anglo-Norman *freiter (modern dialectal French fretter), from Vulgar Latin *frictāre, frequentative of Latin fricāre, from fricō (to chafe, rub), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreyH- (to cut); compare Old French froter (modern French frotter). The chief difficulty is the lack of evidence of the Old French word.

Verb

fret (third-person singular simple present frets, present participle fretting, simple past fretted or fret or frate, past participle fretted or (usually in compounds) fretten)

  1. (transitive, obsolete or poetic) Especially when describing animals: to consume, devour, or eat.
  2. (transitive) To chafe or irritate; to worry.
  3. (transitive) To make rough, to agitate or disturb; to cause to ripple.
  4. (transitive) In the form fret out: to squander, to waste.
  5. (transitive, intransitive) To gnaw; to consume, to eat away.
  6. (transitive, intransitive) To be chafed or irritated; to be angry or vexed; to utter peevish expressions through irritation or worry.
  7. (intransitive) To be worn away; to chafe; to fray.
  8. (intransitive) To be anxious, to worry.
  9. (intransitive) To be agitated; to rankle; to be in violent commotion.
  10. (intransitive, brewing, oenology) To have secondary fermentation (fermentation occurring after the conversion of sugar to alcohol in beers and wine) take place.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

fret (plural frets)

  1. Agitation of the surface of a fluid by fermentation or some other cause; a rippling on the surface of water.
  2. Agitation of the mind marked by complaint and impatience; disturbance of temper; irritation.
  3. Herpes; tetter (any of various pustular skin conditions).
  4. (mining, in the plural) The worn sides of riverbanks, where ores or stones containing them accumulate after being washed down from higher ground, which thus indicate to miners the locality of veins of ore.

Etymology 2

From Middle English frēten (to adorn, decorate, ornament), from Old French freté, freter, fretter (to fret (decorate with an interlacing pattern)), from Old French fret (from fraindre (to break), from Latin frangō (to break, shatter), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰreg- (to break)) + Old French -er (suffix forming verbs) (from Latin -āre, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃enh₂- (to burden, charge)).

Noun

fret (plural frets)

  1. An ornamental pattern consisting of repeated vertical and horizontal lines, often in relief.
  2. (heraldry) A saltire interlaced with a mascle.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

fret (third-person singular simple present frets, present participle fretting, simple past and past participle fretted)

  1. (transitive) To decorate or ornament, especially with an interlaced or interwoven pattern, or (architecture) with carving or relief (raised) work.
  2. (transitive) To form a pattern on; to variegate.
  3. (transitive) To cut through with a fretsaw, to create fretwork.
Derived terms
  • unfret
Translations

Etymology 3

From Old French frete (ferrule, ring) (modern French frette). The origin of the music senses are uncertain; they are possibly from frete or from fret (“to chafe, rub”).

Noun

fret (plural frets)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) A ferrule, a ring.
  2. (music) One of the pieces of metal, plastic or wood across the neck of a guitar or other string instrument that marks where a finger should be positioned to depress a string as it is played.
Derived terms
  • fretboard
  • fretless
  • fretman
Translations

Verb

fret (third-person singular simple present frets, present participle fretting, simple past and past participle fretted)

  1. To bind, to tie, originally with a loop or ring.
  2. (transitive, music) Musical senses.
    1. To fit frets on to (a musical instrument).
    2. To press down the string behind a fret.
Related terms
  • refret
Translations

References

  • fret on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • fret at OneLook Dictionary Search

Etymology 4

From Latin fretum (channel, strait).

Noun

fret (plural frets)

  1. A channel, a strait; a fretum.
Related terms
  • fretum
  • transfretation
  • transfrete

Etymology 5

From Old French frete, fraite, fraicte, possibly partly confused with fret (channel, strait).

Noun

fret (plural frets)

  1. (rare) A channel or passage created by the sea.

Etymology 6

Attested since the mid-1800s, of unknown origin. Perhaps related to fret (to form a pattern upon), fret (to consume) (as the fog does the land), or fret (to agitate the surface of water) (as the wind which blows the fog inland does); compare the semantics of haar (cold wind; misty wind; fog, mist). Dialectally, the spelling freet and pronunciation /fɹit/ are also found, as they also are for fret (consume; agitate).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɹɛt/

Noun

fret (plural frets)

  1. (Northumbria) A fog or mist at sea, or coming inland from the sea.
Derived terms
  • sea fret

References

Anagrams

  • TERF, reft, terf, tref

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /frɛt/
  • Hyphenation: fret
  • Rhymes: -ɛt
  • Homophone: Fred

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch furet, fret, from Old French furet, from Vulgar Latin *fūrittus, diminutive of Latin fūr (thief).

Noun

fret m (plural fretten, diminutive fretje n)

  1. ferret, Mustela putorius furo
Hypernyms
  • bunzing

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English fret.

Noun

fret m (plural frets, diminutive fretje n)

  1. (music) fret, on the neck on for example a guitar

Anagrams

  • erft, tref

French

Etymology

From Old French fret, from Middle Dutch vrecht, from Old Dutch *frēht, from Proto-Germanic *fra- + *aihtiz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʁɛ/
  • Homophones: feraient, ferais, ferait, frais, frets

Noun

fret m (plural frets)

  1. (shipping) Freight, cargo fees: the cost of transporting cargo by boat.
  2. (by extension) Rental of a ship, in whole or in part.
  3. Freight, cargo, payload (of a ship).
    • 2008 March 9, Reuters, “L’ATV Jules Verne né sous une bonne étoile”,
      Il n’y aura plus alors que les vaisseaux Progress russes pour emmener du fret à bord de la station spatiale, et les Soyouz pour les vols habités.

      So there will only be the Russian Progress shuttles to take freight aboard the space station, and the Soyuz for manned flights.

Descendants

  • Portuguese: frete
  • Spanish: flete

Further reading

  • “fret” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Gothic

Romanization

frēt

  1. Romanization of ????????????????

Old French

Alternative forms

  • frait

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle Dutch vrecht.

Noun

fret m (oblique plural frez or fretz, nominative singular frez or fretz, nominative plural fret)

  1. charge (demand of payment in exchange for goods or services)
Descendants
  • French: fret
    • Portuguese: frete
    • Spanish: flete
  • Galician: frete

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

fret

  1. past participle of fraindre

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