erratic vs mercurial what difference

what is difference between erratic and mercurial

English

Alternative forms

  • erratick, erraticke, erratique (all obsolete)

Etymology

From Latin erraticus; compare Old French erratique.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈɹætɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ætɪk

Adjective

erratic (comparative more erratic, superlative most erratic)

  1. unsteady, random; prone to unexpected changes; not consistent
    Henry has been getting erratic scores on his tests: 40% last week, but 98% this week.
  2. Deviating from normal opinions or actions; eccentric; odd.
    erratic conduct

Antonyms

  • consistent

Derived terms

  • erratical
  • erratically
  • erraticness

Translations

Noun

erratic (plural erratics)

  1. (geology) A rock moved from one location to another, usually by a glacier.
    • 2003, Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything, BCA 2003, p. 372:
      The term for a displaced boulder is an erratic, but in the nineteenth century the expression seemed to apply more often to the theories than to the rocks.
  2. Anything that has erratic characteristics.

Synonyms

  • (glaciers): dropstone

Translations

Anagrams

  • Cartier, cartier, cirrate, rice rat


English

Etymology

Noun sense 1 (“(obsolete) plant known as mercury”) is from Middle English mercurial, mercuryal (a plant, probably the goosefoot (Chenopodium); (possibly) dog’s mercury (Mercurialis perennis)), from Anglo-Norman mercurial and Old French mercurial, or directly from their etymon Latin mercuriālis (a plant, probably annual mercury (Mercurialis annua)), from mercuriālis (pertaining to the Roman god Mercury, adjective), from Mercurius (the Roman god Mercury) + -ālis (suffix forming adjectives of relationship from nouns).

Later adjective and noun uses may have been directly derived from Latin mercuriālis (adjective), whence Middle English mercurial, Mercurial (under the astrological influence of the planet Mercury).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /məːˈkjʊə.ɹɪ.əl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /mɝˈkjʊ.ɹi.əl/, /-ˈkjɔ-/
  • Hyphenation: mer‧cu‧ri‧al

Noun

mercurial (plural mercurials)

  1. (obsolete) Any of the plants known as mercury, especially the annual mercury or French mercury (Mercurialis annua). [13th–17th c.]
  2. (astrology) A person born under the influence of the planet Mercury; hence, a person having an animated, lively, quick-witted or volatile character. [from 16th c.]
  3. (chemistry) A chemical compound containing mercury.
  4. (pharmacology, historical) A preparation of mercury, especially as a treatment for syphilis. [from 17th c.]

Alternative forms

  • mercuriall (obsolete)

Translations

Adjective

mercurial (comparative more mercurial, superlative most mercurial)

  1. (comparable) Having a lively or volatile character; animated, changeable, quick-witted. [from 17th c.]
    Synonyms: fickle, unpredictable
  2. (not comparable, astrology) Pertaining to the astrological influence of the planet Mercury; having the characteristics of a person under such influence (see adjective sense 1). [from 16th c.]
  3. (not comparable, astronomy) Pertaining to the planet Mercury. [from 14th c.]
  4. (not comparable, chemistry) Of or pertaining to the element mercury or quicksilver; containing mercury. [from 16th c.]
  5. (not comparable, medicine) Caused by the action of mercury or a mercury compound.
  6. (not comparable, Roman mythology) Pertaining to Mercury, the Roman god of, among other things, commerce, financial gain, communication, and thieves and trickery; hence (comparable), money-making; crafty. [from 15th c.]

Alternative forms

  • mercuriall (obsolete)
  • (pertaining to the Roman god Mercury or planet Mercury): Mercurial

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Notes

References

Further reading

  • Mercurialis (plant) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • mercury (element) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Mercury (mythology) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Mercury (planet) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Interlingua

Adjective

mercurial (not comparable)

  1. mercurial, pertaining to mercury (metal)

Middle English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin mercuriālis, Mercuriālis (pertaining to the Roman god Mercury).

Noun

mercurial (uncountable)

  1. (botany) A plant belonging to the genus Chenopodium; a goosefoot.
    Synonym: mercurie

Alternative forms

  • mercuriale

Adjective

mercurial

  1. (astrology, astronomy) Pertaining to or under the influence of the planet Mercury.

Alternative forms

  • Mercurial

Descendants

  • English: mercurial

References

  • “mercuriāl, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 5 May 2019.
  • “Mercuriāl, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 5 May 2019.

Romanian

Etymology

From French mercuriel, from Latin mercurialis.

Adjective

mercurial m or n (feminine singular mercurială, masculine plural mercuriali, feminine and neuter plural mercuriale)

  1. mercurial

Declension


Spanish

Adjective

mercurial (plural mercuriales)

  1. mercurial

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